Course Information

 

for A. Art and Religion Department


SPOKEN WORD POETRY AS MINSTRY (RA-0010)

Credits:0

UNLEASHING THE WITHIN: SPOKEN WORD POETRY AS CREATIVE ARTS MINISTRY Spoken word is a form of rhythmic poetry based in hip-hop culture that is one of the most dynamic and important literary expressions of the new century. Often practiced in "poetry slams" at coffee shops, bookstores, and bars across the country, the community of spoken word transcends boundaries of race, class, ethnicity, age, gender identity, and sexual orientation. This workshop will examine the tradition, history, and practice of spoken word poetry as a means of creative ministry. The workshop is particularly recommended for anyone who works with youth and young adults as a way of understanding the rhythm of the younger generation. Workshop participants will develop their own rhyming style and perform for each other in a safe, nonjudgmental environment. No previous writing, speaking, or performing experience is necessary. Jump in, grab the mic, and surprise yourself with the power of your own voice! Class meets 7/13/13, from 10:00am-4:00pm, at PSR.

COMMUNITY DANCERS (RA-1000)

Credits:0

Community Dancers is an ongoing Community serving the GTU and the Local Church. This weekly two-hour commitment seeks to provide the opportunity to discover our dance, uncover our theology, and recover our celebration as a faith-filled community. The approach will be unabashedly incarnational. Awareness of dance enjoyment, employment, and education in the church can become the strong foundation on which to build moving worships, presiding styles, and lives. No previous dance experience necessary.

THE MANY FACES OF DANCE (RA-1002)

Credits:3

This course prepares students through careful study of the performing arts, particularly dance, toward an in-depth understanding of how art and religion interact, have a transforming effect on our lives, and give evidence of our desire to connect to the divine. Students will view video taped performances and attend a series of live performances and/or symposia chosen for themes that directly or indirectly address the sacred. The course is divided into field trips, lecture, reflection and experiential sessions (including movement warm-up and elements of composition) to better understand the process of creation. Students may choose to submit a paper or create and present an original five-minute performance piece as their final project.

PERCEIVING SACRED IN PERF ARTS (RA-1010)

Credits:3

The performing arts are used as frame, canvas and medium to search for evidence of our desire to connect to the divine. Students view videotaped performances and attend a series of selected live performances and/or symposia chosen for themes that directly or indirectly address the sacred. During classroom discussion, students share their perception of what the artist expressed, the way(s) in which it was expressed, as well as thoughts on why the artist may have created that particular work. Attention will be given to the exploration of elements of composition to better understand the process of creation. Students may choose to submit a paper or create and present an original five minute performance piece as their final project. Evaluation based on project, classwork, and final project/paper.

COMMUNITY DANCERS: (RA-1011)

Credits:0

An opportunity for advanced beginners, intermediate, and advanced level students of dance to share in prayer and technique, forming a dance community at the GTU. The class will be taught by Sylvia Miller-Mutia under the direction of Carla De Sola. There will be opportunity for creating special dances to serve both the GTU and wider community as occasion arises. Occasional sessions will focus on projects being done by students in the Specialty Certificate in Dance program.

DANCE MEDITATION (RA-1014)

Credits:1.5

DANCE MEDITATION FOR PRAYER AND LITURGY Through movement mediation the sacred dancer demonstrates through her/his body a balance of action, awareness, and contemplation. The practice involves stillness and focused prayer, combined with exercises opening to flowing movement and ecstatic response to scripture, nature, and the urgings of our life. Prayer dance forms based on Taize chants are included, along with improvisatory movement skills. Evaluation is based on participation in class work, projects, and reflection papers. This course is intended for all programs of study. This course begins halfway through the semester. The first class meeting will be Tuesday, 3/31/15 in Mudd 100.

RELIGION & ART MEET THE WORLD (RA-1015)

Credits:3

This course will explore religious art from five major religions in the world today, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism, and the way each religion engages the suffering and injustices of the modern world through their art. Readings will explore the connection between art history, social engagement, and spirituality. Students will take part in artistic practices and self-directed field trips to local artistic events as part of the course, in order to create opportunities for discernment and spiritual reflection. Students will be evaluated by three small reflection papers and a final paper or creative project focused on the use of art in the studentTs own tradition.

DANCE OF THE WOMAN'S SPIRIT (RA-1016)

Credits:1.5

Delving deeply into the wisdom of body/spirit by way of dance, we touch our feminine core, finding renewed faith, strength and beauty. Each session includes movement meditations and warm-ups as well as guided improvisations developed around potent images from scripture, literature, art and life. We focus on selected women of scripture and history and bond with them through weaving our stories with theirs in a final dance/ritual. No previous experience is necessary. Class may be taken for 1.5 or 3 units depending on the scope of the student's project.

SACRED DANCE FOR HEALING (RA-1020)

Credits:1.5

Offering a path for both inner work and outer expression, sacred dance becomes a potent and rich resource for healing, for rejoicing in body, mind, and spirit. We turn to the healing properties of dance by way of movement and meditation, including dancing healing texts from scripture and other spiritual sources. Embodying and lifting into consciousness our fears and hopes, healing rituals are created and shared. All are welcome.

LITURGICAL DANCE (RA-1022)

Credits:1.5

An introduction to dance as an integral part of a religious service, the course include both theory and practice through the use of gesture, movement, dance, and readings. Liturgical dance study is shaped according to its function in the service, including processions, prayer, meditations, proclamations and celebratory dances. Major feasts and seasons are touched upon, with a special focus on Lent and Easter in the spring semester. Evaluation based on liturgical dance assignments and projects and 6-8 page crafted reflection paper for those electing 3 units.

CREATING SACRED DANCES (RA-1030)

Credits:1.5

Toward building a dance ministry grounded in bodily and spiritual awareness, students will be engaged in the living process of sacred dance. Included will be both the learning of repertory and the creation of a group choral dance of an experimental nature. Class includes meditation, warm-up and improvisation for spiritual, technical and bodily awareness. All levels invited.

DANCING PASSAGES AND SEASONS (RA-1032)

Credits:1.5

Dancing gives new dimensions to the turning points in our own lives and in the church year. The class focuses on learning to create for such occasions, beginning with simple dance prayers and moving to more complex structures. Students work alone and in groups. Included are warm-ups and study of elements of dance technique, craft, and improvisation which strengthen the student's ability to express clearly and effectively. A major dance ritual will be required of those who elect to take the course for 3 units. No prior dance experience required.

DIMENSIONS OF SACRED DANCE (RA-1034)

Credits:1.5

THE SPIRIT MOVES: DIMENSIONS OF SACRED DANCE draws upon aspects of dance that stir us toward developing an embodied spirituality for our times. Inspired by scripture and writings primarily from the Judeo/Christian tradition, classes will be shaped around the themes of dance and healing, dancing the gospel of peace, and dancing texts of wisdom and the feminine spirit. Sessions include dance meditation, moving into a gentle warm-up. Evaluation based on assignments, attendance, and participation in a sacred dance project. For those electing 3 units, the project is accompanied by an eight page crafted reflection paper. No previous dance experience necessary.

OUTSIDE ART/VISIONS OF SPIRIT (RA-1071)

Credits:1.5

My work has a spirit in it. God brought these visions upon me and I have these visions and have to tell 'em to somebody and this world is all I got to tell 'em to. --Howard Finster. This studio course will survey self-taught and visionary individuals who engage in creative activity as an expression of spirituality. Their art work offers unique perspectives in contemporary spiritual expression. Many of these artists make use of discarded materials to create their imaginative realms thus making the ordinary shimmer with extraordinary spirit. Through their hands, creativity becomes a pathway to an embodied relationship with the Divine and ultimately with our world. An on-going creative practice in a variety of mixed media will be engaged with in each class. A modest materials fee will be assessed for this course. Class meets daily, 1/8/18-1/10/18, from 2:10pm-5:00pm, and F 1/12/18 from 9:40am-4:40pm, at Doug Adams Gallery.

WRITING YOUR JOURNEY (RA-1083)

Credits:3

READING AND WRITING SPIRITUAL MEMOIRS This is a class for those who enjoy reading spiritual memoirs and would like to begin writing their own ^soul^ stories. The class will feature readings from significant spiritual writers with invitations to write personal responses to the themes. Each week students will write life stories from their lives and listen to the responses of others in the class. At the end of the class, students will be asked to review their stories and write a longer ^memoir^ integrating themes from their lives. This will be a semester long class in small group format. This class is intended for seminarians and others interested in writing about their lives from a faith perspective. [10 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

ARTS' MINISTRIES IN NEW YORK (RA-1195)

Credits:1.5

Learn how arts help transform dying churches into thriving churches which involve persons from all ages, races, sexual orientations, and classes. The course will be held at Middle Collegiate Church in the East Village of New York City and will explore how that church under Gordon Dragt's leadership made such a transformation from a church of less than twenty persons to a fast growing church involving thousands of persons through a gospel choir, jazz ensemble, steel drum band, photo gallery and dark room, pottery studio, labyrinth, dance and drama companies in residence, improvisational arts ensembles, puppet theatre, AIDS Ministry Banquets with arts, street festivals, after school arts' center, children's summer arts program, and worship with all the arts. The class meets mornings from Sunday through Thursday at Middle Collegiate Church at 50 East 7th Street, New York City with afternoons and evenings available to explore other churches' art ministries and other arts in New York City. For further information contact David Steward by email at . Class meets Sunday-Sunday, 1/04/09-1/11/09, in New York City. This course is offered by CARE.

WRITING RELIGIOUS DRAMA (RA-1408)

Credits:1.5

Workshop in writing religious drama. Focus will be on elements of plot, characterization and dialogue. Students will be expected to develop a full-length piece or two short pieces with special emphasis on ministerial settings. [PIN code required]

POETRY AND PRAYER (RA-1426)

Credits:1.5

This course is a two-day intensive intended to invite reflection on the relationship between poetry and prayer and help cultivate reading and writing practices that may deepen appreciation of biblical poetry and fruitfully integrate poetry with worship and liturgy. Coursework will involve both critical and creative writing. Class meets Saturday 2/3 and 2/10/2017, from 10:00am to 6:00pm.

DIVINE IMAGE IN FILM AND DRAMA (RA-1450)

Credits:1.5

A creative exploration of selected theological themes, including: Redemption as Dilemma; Chaos, Darkness and Creation; The Transforming Experience and Images of the Holy. These and other themes will be explored in modern theater and cinema, focusing on how the dramatic and filmic expression of these themes give them a further creative power. Drama selections will include Miller's ALL MY SONS; George Bernard Shaw's SAINT JOAN; and Graham Green's THE POTTING SHED. Film selections will include Martin Martin Scorceses's MEAN STREETS; Fellini's SATYRICON, and Scorceses's MEAN STREETS; Fellini's SATYRICON, and Norman Jewison's AGNES OF GOD.

CHURCH MUSIC & LITRGCL SINGING (RA-1710)

Credits:3

Introduction to the music of the Episcopal Church, to prepare students both to exercise musical leadership in Episcopal liturgy and to develop guiding philosophies for the implementation of music in parish life. Lecture/discussion. Reflection papers, chanting and a final/paper defining a personal philosophy of liturgical music. [Auditors with faculty permission]

WORSHIP AND THE ARTS (RA-1800)

Credits:3

An historical, theological, and practical approach to understanding the early forms of worship and the arts in each denomination; how such forms evolved into the modern period; how these and other forms may serve as resources in reforming modern worship and the arts in shaping community; and how different forms have different consequences. Special attention is given to planning, leading, and involving laity in worship and the arts. Arts included are architecture, dance, drama, film, mime, music, poetry, puppetry, storytelling, and visual arts.

SACRED ARTS: MANDALA (RA-1814)

Credits:1.5

The mandala is an ancient sacred symbol that interweaves spiritual, psychological, and physical aspects of personal and cultural beliefs. In many traditions, the mandala diagrams the origins of creation and is an organizing force through which spiritual energy is accessed. In contemporary times, the psychologist Carl Jung explored this potent form as the central energy from which an individual's grown and movement toward wholeness originate. This course focuses on a personal exploration of the mandala through a variety of experiential exercises. Coursework includes meditative practices such as mindfulness and centering prayer, and a variety of creative practices including collage, mixed media, the use of two- and three-dimensional materials, and poetry. A modest materials fee will be assessed for this course. Course meets in CARE's Doug Adams Gallery, 2465 Le Conte Avenue, Berkeley. Seven class meetings between 9/11/17 and 10/30/17 (no class during GTU Reading Week).

HOW ART COMMUNICATES TRUTH (RA-1817)

Credits:3

This course will explore how different styles of art - i.e. how the artist paints - have developed in order to communicate different aspects of the human person. This exploration will lead to an understanding of why there is such a diversity of liturgical styles, both figurative and non-figurative. It will be taught through a combination of lecture and classroom discussion, supported by a practical component involving painting and praying with sacred art. Students will learn how line and tone are use in different ways in different styles of visual art and how the artist uses them to enable the work of art to fulfill its purpose (in particular Gothic and baroque figurative art, and Romanesque and Islamic geometric patterned art), and the basic principles for the creation of paint. They also will understand how to choose between different mediums (e.g. oil, egg tempera, and mosaic) in relation to the ultimate purpose of the work of art. No prior experience or special painting ability is necessary. However, as painting instruction is individual (even in a classroom setting), those who are experienced painters will find this stimulating and interesting. A $75 materials fee is required, payable at the first class. Intended audience: This course is offered to fulfill the DSPT Studio Art Course requirement for those enrolled in Religion and Arts and Sacred Arts concentrations. All others welcome. PLEASE NOTE: In order to fulfill Federal regulations on classroom time hours, this studio art course runs longer than normal- from 8:10am-12:30pm.

ART & RELIGION: MODERN AMERICA (RA-1827)

Credits:1.5

The course begins with an exploration of art and religion and how they inform each other in cultural expressions. This theoretical exploration provides the background for learning to look and to examine this semester a wide variety of spiritual experiences perceived through the works of 20th and 21st century American artists. With many class sessions in Bay Area museums, we learn to sense finitude and infinity, control and chance in creation with Pollock, Rothko, Newman, Gottlieb, Frankenthaler, De Feo, and Reinhardt (Thomas Merton's close friend); return to earth and pilgrimage from Noguchi and Smithson to de Maria, Lin, and Christo; sacramental perceptions from O'Keeffe to Zackheim, Nevelson, Saunders, and Chodos; post-critical ironic reaffirmation of world from Duchamp to Jasper Johns, Rauschenberg, and Warhol; reaffirmation of the human body from De Kooning to Segal, De Staebler, Neri, Arneson, Brown, Dickinson, Rosen, and Morphesis; transforming light from Irwin, Turrell, Bell, and Lippold. For 1.5 units, the student every other week writes a brief paper based on viewing a different art work; for 3 units the student does the bi-weekly papers and a final paper or project. [40 max enrollment]

SO. ASIAN RELGNS & POP CULTURE (RA-1960)

Credits:3

This class offers a historical survey of American pop-cultural portrayals of Hinduism and Buddhism through a theoretical lens that explores notions of representation and authenticity. While placing special emphasis on early pulp magazines and comic books, it traces the rise of the American mystic superhero back to French and English fiction of the Victorian era as it maps the legacy of colonial stereotypes and the Theosophical preoccupations of the 19th century that carried over into the new American popular media of the 1920s & 30s (serialized film, radio dramas, pulps and comics). As the survey proceeds towards the 21st century, students will explore an ever expanding variety of media forms that depict these religious traditions not only within a South Asian religious context but also transplanted into a purely American narrative landscape. While some of these tales range from the sensationalistic towards the fantastic, others strive to embody a unique authenticity or profundity. This class will demonstrate the important place South Asian religious traditions have occupied in the American popular imagination.[Auditors with Faculty permission]

DANCE AND LIBERATION (RA-2019)

Credits:3

Dance addresses five physical phenomenon: power, sexuality, relationship, mortality, and identity. Of these, power is dance's foremost communication. That is why it has served from biblical history to the present as a prophetic, joyous, and troubling art form. It is particularity equipped to stir images of oppression and liberation. As an art it can be a potent form of social action, religious witness, and liturgical proclamation. This course will provide opportunity to experience and witness dance in the context of liberation. [Max enrollment 15]

A CRY FOR JUSTICE IN HYMNODY (RA-2055)

Credits:1.5

Course is co-taught by Dr. Nancy E. Hall & Rev. Dan Damon. Students will develop their knowledge of hymnody and deepen their awareness of the social issues of our time and how to motivate change through the song of the church. We will look for the best and most singable congregational songs in all musical styles as we develop a sense of how to choose songs and hymns for authentic worship while making use of the resources of recent denominational hymnals. Included in this course will be the many justice hymns of Daniel Charles Damon. This course is appropriate for masters level students.

PREACHING AS THEATER (RA-2056)

Credits:3

A preaching practicum in which the student will prepare and deliver two sermons based on the premise of preaching as an alternative form of theater. The background and basis of this premise will be the ^Theodrama^ writings of theologian Hans Urs Von Balthasar

RELIGION & SCIENCE IN CINEMA (RA-2301)

Credits:3

This course, intended for MA and MDiv Students of the GTU/PSR consortium. The first half of class will be dedicated to screening that week's viewing. The second half will consist of a brief lecture by the professors identifying key themes in the movie, and then a general class discussion. By the end of this course, students will be able to: (1) Relate the history of modern cinema to key twentieth-century scientific and religious developments and argue for the relevance of cinema to these developments; (2) Explain the ways in which apparently ^objective^ scientific research can both express and influence ^subjective^ religious commitments; (3) Identify different film genres. Grading will be based upon: 20% Regular Attendance and Participation; 80% Written work- Two 600-700 word essays reflecting upon issues and theoretical questions raised by the films and course readings. One Midterm of No More Than 3000 words. A 12-15 page final paper on a pre-approved research topic. [20 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

THE ART OF HOLY PLACES (RA-2357)

Credits:3

This course will look at sacred sites of the world's major religions from an artistic perspective, exploring the ways that people have marked, decorated, and changed these spaces, and how that artistic representation reflects the tenets of that faith. We will also consider how the physical development of the space impacts the ways in which it is perceived and used as a destination for worship, pilgrimage, and spiritual revitalization. Students will make in-class presentations and will submit a final paper on a related topic; course intended for Master's level students. This course is offered by CARE.

CREATIVITY AND TRANSFORMATION (RA-2400)

Credits:3

ART FLOURISHES WHERE THERE IS A SENSE OF ADVENTURE -Alfred North Whitehead The creative process has an intrinsic power to promote personal growth, deepen spirituality, and effect positive transformation in the world. This course will introduce a number of studio art practices through which the vital and dynamic energy of an individual's creativity can be accessed. Perception and spirit unfold. Potential and dream begin to take form. Answering the call of creativity opens the door to an evolving transformative energy that sustains and nourishes your life and your work in the world.

SPIRIT OF ARTS & CRAFTS MVT (RA-2731)

Credits:3

In this course, we'll examine the works produced by the Arts & Crafts movement, while exploring their spiritual underpinnings and implications. The class will include trips to local buildings and exhibitions to view these works in person. We will conclude by considering if there are parallels in our own time as people - individuals, artists, and communities of faith -grapple with an increasingly complex digital age. Each student will submit a final project that will include both a written paper and a design project.

PRAY THROUGH CONTEMPORARY ART (RA-2733)

Credits:3

This is primarily an art practicum, concentrating on creating combinations of both visual and written personal prayers. The historical context will derive from the Arts and Crafts revival of 1890 to the present. Art techniques include lettering, mixed media, stenciling, and contemporary encaustic painting. There will be a reader for this class containing reflections from several Faith traditions, art techniques and visual prompts. The evaluation method will be graded on attendance, class involvement, completions of assignments, reflection papers, quizzes and completion of the final project. The final project will be the completion of a prayer book that utilizes several of the modern art techniques practiced during the course of the semester. The intended audience is for any gradu7ate level student who has the desire to journey deeper into their personal prayer life, utilizing the tools of art and written reflection.

MASTERPIECES OF RELIGIOUS ART (RA-3490)

Credits:3

This seminar offers an introduction to fundamental art historical concepts through some of the masterpieces of western religious art from the Parthenon to Andy Warhol. Emphasis will be on developing critical looking skills for priestly/ministerial application. Visits to local museums. Active class participation, presentations, brief looking assignments and a research paper. No previous knowledge of art required.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP (RA-3700)

Credits:1.5

The purpose of this workshop is twofold: (1) to enable the artist in each person to become more free and more able to write, (2) to model a methodology for using writing to create a healing community. There are no required readings or papers for this workshop. There will also be a showing of the internationally award-winning film, Tell Me Something I Can't Forget, followed by a discussion of using writing to empower the silenced. Open to the public; details TBA. Class meets daily, 8/5/13-8/9/13, from 9:00am-1:00pm, at PSR. [Max enrollment 6]

ARTS' MINISTRY & PRACTICALITY (RA-4325)

Credits:1.5

An exploration of practical ways for students to support their own artistic development and the arts of others for future settings of pastoring or teaching. This course is for both those who intend a full-time ministry with dance, drama, clowning, music, poetry or visual arts and those who plan to keep alive a part-time, free lance artistic side of themselves or others in church or school. Drawing on insights from guests already making a living in the field of ^ministry and the arts^ and in various areas of arts' managment, we will attend to ways of promoting ourselves and our craft: using artist-in-residence programs, publishing articles and books, CDs, and DVDs; teaching through workshop circuits; joining arts' guilds; saving on taxes; gaining foundation grants; and developing centers for the arts. May be taken for 1.5 or 3 credits depending on whether the student develops a five-year plan or a ten-year plan to achieve his or her goals.

HOW TO MAKE FILMS FOR RELIGION (RA-4496)

Credits:3

Sharing from first hand experience, having made documentaries since the late 60's and motion pictures in the 70's, 80's, and 90's, the instructor will bridge the gap between Hollywood and theology. In this class, students will learn that the church is a perfect place to make a movie. The class will explore techniques which can be used to produce low budget films using church membership and facilities as their resource. [10 max enrollment/ Sig. on Reg. Card]

TOLKIEN & THE VISUAL ARTS (RA-4945)

Credits:3

This course will map the relationships between religion, literature, and the visual arts through the lens of J.R.R. Tolkien's epic novel, The Lord of the Rings (1954). We will begin with a critical reading of Tolkien's texts, considering questions of intertextuality and influence, religion, mythography, cultural context, and belief. In conjunction with the readings, we will examine his little-known illustrations in the collection of the Bodleian Library, Oxford, and assess the compelling relationship between text and image. Using reception aesthetics as a critical approach, the second half of the course will investigate a wide variety of visual art that has evolved out of Tolkien's works, including Peter Jackson's blockbuster films. Major themes will include the legacy of 20th-century literature, the relationship between text and image, and the notion of the Catholic Imagination as conceived by Andrew Greeley, Wendy Wright, and others. Seminar format with film screenings and weekly reading assignments. Students will be evaluated through final research papers on an original topic of their choice (70% of final grade), class participation (10% of final grade), and an oral presentation (20% of final grade).

MUSEUMS & RELIGION (RA-4980)

Credits:3

Most museums in the United States, whether explicitly or implicitly, deal with religion and spirituality. Some museums center on the beliefs of specific religious groups, others present exhibitions featuring religious objects, and still others deal with historical and cultural aspects of religion. In this course, students will explore how religion and spirituality is embedded in museum exhibitions. Students will consider how they might incorporate visiting museum exhibitions or learning about museum collections into their own theological study. This course will involve both seminar-style discussion and visits to Bay Area museums. Discussion will center on the course readings, which consider both theory and practice in the area of museums, religion, and spirituality. Site visits will focus on evaluating exhibitions with respect to religious and spiritual content. Assignments will include museum-based presentations, short written reviews, and a final paper. This course is open to students at the MA or PhD level.

MATTER AND SPIRIT (RA-5810)

Credits:3

MATTER AND SPIRIT: UNDERSTANDING MATERIAL CULTURE Material culture theory offers fertile ground for interpreting the complex role of ^things^ in historical contexts and in the present day, in daily life and in spiritual practice. This course will consider the subject from several angles, based on classics in material culture theory derived from anthropology, archaeology, sociology, and other fields. Students will apply those theories to sacred objects in a variety of contexts - how can we think about sacred objects in the museum? houses of worship? literature? visual arts? This seminar, designed for PhD and advanced MA students, is based on reading and discussion; assignments will include presentations and papers. The course will include several visits to local museums.

BRINGING BIBLCL HUMOR TO LIFE (RABS-1900)

Credits:1.5

Attention is on understanding biblical humor and learning to bring this humor to life in worship, preaching, teaching, and social action as well as counseling. Special attention will be given to the variety of prophetic humor in the Old Testament, to the humor revealed by narrative criticism in Jesus' parables, to humor revealed by rhetorical criticism in Paul's epistles, to the humor revealed by contrasting stories of Jesus' miracles and the Greco-Roman miracle stories, and how the arts of drama, mime, dance, storytelling, clowning, music and painting reveal different aspects of biblical humor. No previous work in the arts is necessary. Students may take the course for 1.5 or 3.0 units depending on the scope and length of their final paper or project.

HOW HYMNS SHAPE WRSHP & FAITH (RAED-2753)

Credits:3

In this seminar-style course we will study the history of hymnody in Christian worship, various forms and styles of hymns, current directions in new hymns, and how the texts of our hymns serve as a foundation for Christian education, as well as for personal and corporate theology. Assignments include brief weekly reflection papers, journal article reviews, and a 7-10 page worship/teaching event built on hymns, with class presentation. All are welcome, as we ^free our hearts to sing God's praises, while God's music shapes our souls.^

PRAISE BAND (RAFT-1724)

Credits:1

Practicum in leading worship and performing service music. This course is designed for people with some musical experience to further develop skills in playing in a band, service playing on piano and/or organ, song-leading, simple conducting, music arranging and other various skills based upon the participants' abilities. Pass/Fail only.

AGING AND THE HUMAN SPIRIT (RAFT-1770)

Credits:3

AGING AND THE HUMAN SPIRIT is an interdisciplinary, multi-faith, and cross- cultural exploration of the spiritual/cultural needs of older persons. The course will offer theoretical and practical instruction on the art of aging and the art of caring for and ministering to older persons, including 1) the role of spirituality in aging, health, death and dying, and caregiving 2) an overview to the methodologies in religion, spirituality, and aging 3) culturally appropriate assessment and healthcare interventions 4) practical strategies for implementing elder ministry programs 5) and other concerns.

BASIC PREACHING PRACTICUM II (RAFT-2007)

Credits:3

A basic course designed to bring each student's personal approach to preaching into a responsible encounter with the Biblical text. Both exegetical method and sermon delivery will be emphasized. Sermons will be video-taped and evaluated by students and professor. This class is designed primarily for PSR students in Field Ed. placements which afford preaching opportunities. [Intro to Hebrew Scripture or New Testament; 12 max enrollment/ Sig. on Reg. Card; Faculty written permission required/ Sig. on Reg. Card]

PREACHING AS THEATER (RAFT-2033)

Credits:3

A full participation workshop class in which all students will prepare and present two sermon projects which will utilize preaching as a process of ^making present^ rather than a process of describing or explaining.; The two exterior models they will use will be (1) theater in the sense of a living process which ^makes present^ through Mimesis, language and plot and (2) the religious notion of sacrament which moves toward making the divine present in material form.

THEATER & CHURCH MINISTRY (RAFT-2034)

Credits:3

The course will consist of instruction and workshop experience to introduce the student to the use of theater and theatrical events in three areas of church ministry: preaching the word, religious instruction for both adults and young persons and the use of theater for community building, especially in the areas of discrimination and prejudice. If the student wishes to choose another area for the use of theater in church ministry outside the range of these three, they will be encouraged to do so.

PREACHING:THEOLOGY AND PRAXIS (RAFT-2244)

Credits:1.5

This course will expose students to a variety of theologies and understandings of preaching so that they might come to understand preaching within their own contexts. Exegetical methodologies will be reviewed. Students will explore ways of coming to know the community to which they preach. This lecture/discussion class must be taken in conjunction with a 1.5 hour preaching practicum. [Introduction to Old or New Testament; 60 max enrollment/ Sig. on Reg. Card]

PREACHING PRACTICUM (RAFT-2247)

Credits:1.5

Students will work in small groups to explore through various exercises and through preaching, the many issues related to sermon development and delivery. Sermons will be video-taped and evaluated by students and staff. This practicum must be taken in conjunction with Preaching: Theology and Praxis. [Introduction to Old or New Testament; 20 max enrollment/ Sig. on Reg. Card]

LEADING MUSIC FOR WORSHIP (RAFT-2717)

Credits:1.5

Students in this course will gain hands-on experience in the ministry of music: choosing hymns and songs, leading singing, introducing new music, and planning congregational music within the context of worship. Our ^lab^ for this course will be ABSW weekly community chapel service, at 6:00pm on Mondays. For some chapel occasions, members of the class may also form a singing ensemble (no prior singing experience is necessary). In addition to regular class meeting time, students will be required to participate in several of the Monday ABSW chapels during the semester (meet from 5:30pm-6:45pm). Students may take a maximum of two semesters of this course during their degree work. Beginners in music ministry are welcome, as are all GTU students! Pass/Fail only.

SERMON FORM:DIFFRNT ALTRNTIVES (RAFT-4114)

Credits:3

This practicum will explore the new and varied theories related to sermon formation. Students will experiment with inductive, deductive, expository and narrative sermonic forms to find new ways of getting the sermon ^heard^ by the community of faith. Sermon will be videotaped & evaluated by students and instructor. [Basic Preaching; 10 max enrollment/ Sig. on Reg. Card]

ADVANCED PREACHING PRACTICUM (RAFT-4140)

Credits:3

Students in this practicum will participate in various activities that will enhance exegetical and delivery skills. Student sermons will be video taped and evaluated by students and instructor. [Basic Preaching Practicum; 10 max enrollment/ Sig. on Reg. Card]

AMER POETRY & RLGS IMAGINATN (RAHR-2020)

Credits:3

AMERICAN POETRY AND RELIGIOUS IMAGINATION This course will consider questions surrounding the relationship between the poetic imagination and the religious imagination in six American poets, of various religious perspectives--Marianne Moore, Wallace Stevens, Adrienne Rich, George Oppen, Fanney Howe, and Dana Gioia--writing during the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries. While the class will consider the biographical information surrounding the poets' relationships with Protestantism, Judaism, and Catholicism, the primary focus of the class will be on how these religious imaginations, whether actively practiced or culturally absorbed, influence, imbue, and interact with the poets' poetic imaginations. Grades will be determined by class participation (10% of final grade), a presentation essay with questions (15% of final grade), a short essay (15% of final grade), and a research paper (60% of final grade). Inteneded audience: MA/MTS, MDiv students. This course is taught by PhD student Nicole De Leon with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Naomi Seidman.

DANCE IN COMPARATIVE RELGNS: (RAHR-2027)

Credits:3

LIVING TRADITIONS OF THE BAY AREA This course will explore the role of dance in various faith/spiritual traditions through readings, observation, participation, and research. Field trips to performances and dance rituals are planned. Lecture, discussion, participatory format. Short reflections and a major research paper or project. Both students interested in physically dancing and those interested in researching dance are welcome. This course is taught by PhD student Angela Yarber with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Dr. Ron Nakasone.

DANCE: THEORY & CULTURE (RAHR-4600)

Credits:3

This course theorizes dance and religion as they intersect in various cultural contexts. Through close analytical readings of texts and movement, we will explore the political and historical events that shaped a given religious/spiritual dance form and discuss the contemporary issues that surround its continued practice. Formations such as gender, sexuality, lived religion, nationalism, race, class, post-colonialism, globalization, commercialization, and ritual will inform our understanding of the multiple lenses through which these dances and dancers can be viewed. Fundamental questions will include: What is considered dance, and what is considered religion? How does the practice of dancing (or not) affect people's understanding of their spirituality? How does the political construction of the body within a given culture affect who can dance and how they dance in their religious practice?

COMICS, SCIFI, FANTASY (RAHR-4601)

Credits:3

Recent years have seen an explosion of comic book films and television (X-Men, The Avengers, Iron Man, Captain America, Batman, Superman), reboots of classic science fiction franchises (Star Trek, Star Wars, Battlestar Galactica), and definitive adaptations of beloved fantasy titles (Harry Potter, The Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit, The Hunger Games). With elements of mythos, canon, ritual community, grand narratives with cosmic-level consequences, and explorations of ethics, power, and the nature of good and evil, these genres seem to tap into the source code of religious subject matter. This course continues in the tradition of the introductory ^Pop Goes Religion^ course, to focus the interdisciplinary study of religion and popular culture in this fertile trinity of fantasy genres.

CHRISTIANITY IN 50 OBJECTS (RAHS-1061)

Credits:3

This survey course will examine the history of the Christian Church from the Apostolic Age to today through a close reading of 50 objects, inspired by the BBC and British Museum's recent collaboration A History of the World in 100 Objects. Prompted by the increasing scholarly interest in the art and material culture(s) of religion across a number of academic disciplines (including religious studies, history, literature, and anthropology) a select corpus of monuments, spaces, sculptures, pictures, liturgical art, and other objects will serve as a framework for discussion. Students will be evaluated through final research papers on an original topic of their choice (70% of final grade), class participation (10% of final grade), and an oral presentation (20% of final grade). Intended audience: any interested graduate student.

IMAGING THE DIVINE (RAHS-1200)

Credits:3

In this lecture course we will study how people of various faith traditions represented the divine. The students will write short papers and will take in class exams. {Auditors with faculty permission]

THE BOOK AS SPIRITUAL VESSEL (RAHS-1300)

Credits:3

This course explores the book as a receptacle for personal and cultural sacred knowledge. A global perspective is emphasized and serves to introduce a wide variety of devotional book forms and materials that have conveyed spiritual expression throughout history. Through a variety of transformative exercises, meditation, and writing prompts, students will translate their spiritual energy into the forms, materials, and content of devotional books. Coursework includes the contemplative practice of sumianagashi (Japanese marbling) and techniques such as accordion structures, books inspired by Ethiopian healing scrolls, and the codex. Basic book structure will be presented with an emphasis on mixed media and contemporary aspects of bookmaking. Weekly readings and projects will address issues of the metaphoric use of materials and text, interactive qualities of the book form, and bookmaking as a process of spiritual development. [5 max enrollment]

POETRY: WRITING OUR FAITHS (RAHS-1301)

Credits:1.5

Led by an ordained minister and practicing poet, this is a writing-intensive course for those who want to use poetry as a means to explore, challenge, and renew their faiths. We will divide our time between a workshop and a seminar-style study of the work of George Herbert, Emily Dickinson, and a selection of contemporary poets invested in questions of spirit. Student poems will be the focus of the workshop, which will also include writing exercises focused on specific elements of craft. The course is open to all levels of poetry writing experience, and to writers of any religious background.

CHRISTIAN ICONOGRAPHY (RAHS-1604)

Credits:3

An historical survey of the signs, symbols, modes, manners, myths, legends, and art forms of Christian culture, primarily from Biblical figures to time-honored saints. Emphasis on visuals with complementary readings. Lecture format; periodic quizzes, final paper or art project. Intended audience: MDiv, MA/MTS, DMin; PhD and ThD can enroll at higher level with special research paper added to requirements.

ART AND RELIGION IN AMERICA (RAHS-1799)

Credits:1.5

This course treats themes from the Colonial period through the 1980s: Landscapes of the Spirit, Images of Humanity, Images of Christ and other biblical subject matter, civil religion icons, and special visions. This course is structured topically so that art historical and theological developments may be more readily perceived. Half of the class sessions will be held in museums of San Francisco, Berkeley, and Oakland to learn how to look and be informed by visual art. Jane Dillenberger and John Dillenberger will be among those helping us develop eyes to see. May be taken for 1.5 or 3 units.

WOMEN IN RELIGION (RAHS-2000)

Credits:3

This lecture and discussion based course will consider how women both represent and are represented in religious context. We will take an interfaith approach and will study the visual images and production of women in ancient Paganism, Christianity, Islam, Judaism, and Hinduism. The students will give an oral presentation and write a 10 to 15 page final paper.

CHRISTIANITY IN 50 OBJECTS (RAHS-2061)

Credits:3

This survey course will examine the history of the Christian Church from the Apostolic Age to today through a close reading of 50 objects, inspired by the BBC and British Museum's recent collaboration, 'A History of the World in 100 Objects'. Prompted by the increasing scholarly interest in the art and material culture(s) of religion across a number of academic disciplines (including religious studies, history, literature, and anthropology) a select corpus of monuments, spaces, sculptures, pictures, liturgical art, and other objects will serve as a framework for discussion. Students will be evaluated through final research papers on an original topic of their choice (70% of final grade), class participation (10% of final grade), and an oral presentation (20% of final grade). Intended audience: any interested graduate student. This course is co-offered by GTU and JST.

WOMEN, POETRY & THE SACRED (RAHS-2500)

Credits:3

Poetry is a challenging but apt medium for the communication of spiritual life. In this course, we will use poems to get a glimpse of what constituted women's lives for different contemporary American women, all of whom prioritized religious experience. We will examine how the poems portray women's lives. Do they do so convincingly? How have they done so? Have these poets overlooked vital areas of women's lives? We will examine how these women constructed positive views of female life: in friendship, family, places of worship, the workplace, and nature. We will also distill these poems' potential to show us how to observe the world around us, how to relate to the divine, and how to grow more confident in our lives as spiritual and gendered individuals.

CHRISTIAN ART & ICONOGRAPHY (RAHS-3520)

Credits:3

The course offers a survey of the images, architecture, and iconography of Christian art. Moving from the basic framework of Christian art history, students are invited and challenged to explore in depth, central Christian subjects which include figures such as Jesus, the Madonna, the Apostles and the Angels. Emerging themes of Art History and/or Archaeology will be the focus of the predominantly lecture format of the class. Participant evaluations will include short quizzes, and an account of a visit to a local, subject related museum. The final assessment will enable the participant to choose between the submission of a research paper or the creation of an original work of art. Attendance at all classes is mandatory (with one absence only permitted).

ART AND PILGRIMAGE (RAHS-3821)

Credits:3

Geoffrey Chaucer famously wrote that 'folks long to go on pilgrimage.' Indeed, traveling over long distances to a sacred destination is an important ritual practice that has crossed cultures and time. Such journeys have inspired legends, folk-stories, and artistic representations from the early Christian centuries to today. Using a cross-disciplinary approach, this course surveys the relationship of art, material culture, and Christian pilgrimage practice through a close examination of major shrines and their dedications and decorations, paintings, pilgrimage badges and other souvenirs, films, and surrogate sites of pilgrimage such as maps, labyrinths, and manuscripts. We will address the theological underpinning of pilgrimage, as well as the conjunction of artistic practice and contemplative prayer as pilgrimage. Slide lecture format with in-class discussion and weekly reading assignments. Students will be evaluated through final research papers on an original topic of their choice (70% of final grade), class participation (10% of final grade), and an oral presentation (20% of final grade).

ARTS FOR CHANGE (RAHS-3823)

Credits:3

ARTS FOR CHANGE: Modern and Contemporary Art in Service of Transformation will investigate the belief-shared by many artists-that art making and art viewing can be powerful means for initiating change both individually and societally. Although many cultures throughout history have attributed transformative power to images and objects made with human hands-whether these were intended for ritual or aesthetic purposes, or both-post-Enlightenment Western cultures have had a fluctuating and often conflicted relationship with this idea. Western artists of the modern period have at times rejected it, but more often have espoused it in orientations ranging from the mystical and contemplative to socially and politically engaged activism. They have drawn upon many sources in formulating their varied conceptions of art's transformative efficacy, among them tenets of Christian faith, political philosophies, Romantic aesthetics, esoteric teachings, psychology, and Asian religions. Certain artists, especially since the 1960s, have found ways to merge inward and outward orientations in their work, creating art that speaks directly to such issues as societal inequities or ecological crises from a place of deep spiritual commitment. We will examine the various ways artists (and others) have held such aspirations for art, from the Romantic era until today, uncovering the intellectual history of such visions as well as their application in the work of specific artists and art movements, both as a matter of historical inquiry and as a means to explore what value transformative approaches to art-making may have in our own lives and within our communities. Seminar format; assignments will include oral presentation and research paper. Intended for MDiv and MA/MTS students. This course is taught by PhD student Colette Walker with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Devin Zuber.

LITERATURE & HUMAN RIGHTS (RAHS-4032)

Credits:3

TRAUMA AND TESTIMONY: LITERATURE & HUMAN RIGHTS This course surveys the relationship between literature, theology, and the legal spaces of human rights. We will chart the complex ways that concepts like ^compassion, ^ ^witnessing, ^ and ^dignity^ became transposed out of various religious discourses into different aesthetic forms (such as the novel), and how such forms came to engage with emergent legal rights frameworks. Though the seminar proceeds somewhat chronologically, covering several landmark 18th and 19th century literary texts and their political instantiations, the primary focus will be more on recent literary relationships to different ^rights^ spheres, including disability, indigeneity, and the environment. Oral Presentation, Final Research Paper (20-25 pages). Intended audience: advanced MA/MTS, DMin, PhD/ThD.

HERMENEUTICS POETRY & PAINTING (RAHS-4034)

Credits:1.5

LOOKING WITH WORDS AND IMAGES: HERMENEUTICS OF POETRY AND PAINTING. Description TBA

ART, RITUAL, AND CULTURE (RAHS-4179)

Credits:3

This course will examine the ways in which visual arts, music, architecture, and ritual have affected Western understanding of culture and society. The course will be interdisciplinary and will combine lecture and seminar style discussion. Topics will include, among others, soundings from Second Temple Judaism, Paleo-Christian cult, medieval royal architecture and ritual, Renaissance Italian city ceremonies, shrines and pilgrimage in the Spanish Empire, French Revolutionary Cult of Reason, Nazi and Fascist Propaganda, and the post-Christian afterlife of this inheritance in American popular culture. Requirements will include active participation in discussions and a research paper. [25 max enrollment; Auditors with Faculty permission]

MARIAN ART (RAHS-4311)

Credits:3

QUEEN OF HEAVEN, MOTHER, ADVOCATE, OUR LADY OF VICTORY, STAR OF THE SEA From the early Christian centuries to today, representations of the Virgin Mary have evolved and changed, and are as diverse as her many titles. Using a cross-disciplinary approach, this course will closely examine the making, meaning, and reception of Marian images within the various social, religious, and cultural milieus from which they emerged. For example, we will consider Greek icons depicting Mary as Theotokos, or God-bearer, Italian Renaissance imagery of the Virgin and Child, nineteenth-century portrayals of Mary as the Immaculate Conception, the miraculous Madonnas at Guadalupe and Czestochowa, and vernacular Marian shrines. The course will include a pilgrimage to a local Marian site and museum/church visits. Students will be evaluated through final research papers on an original topic of their choice, class participation, and an oral presentation. Intended audience: any advanced graduate student interested in the art and material culture of religion.

CHRISTIAN ISLAMIC INTRCTIONS (RAHS-4610)

Credits:3

CHRISTIAN-ISLAMIC INTERACTIONS IN THE VISUAL ARTS In this class we will study the artistic interactions between Muslims and Christians. The chronological and geographic span of the class will be wide--from the 7th to the 16th century and from the Near East via Constantinople and Venice to Spain. We will explore how trade, pilgrimage, politics, crusades and religious differences and/or similarities contributed to the creation of a specific visual language that could appeal both to Christian and Muslim audiences.

ICONOCLASMS (RAHS-4642)

Credits:3

The main subject of this course will be the destruction of images and the theological justifications for it. We will begin in antiquity, will consider the theological underpinning of the Byzantine and Protestant iconoclasms, and will end with contemporary examples of purposeful obliteration of visual representations. The students will be expected to actively participate in class, and to present and write a paper on a topic of their choosing. [Auditors with faculty permission]

AMER LIT & RELIGS IMAGINARY (RAHS-4880)

Credits:3

This seminar explores a complex dynamic between literature and religious thinking that has characterized American culture since its inception. We will trace a certain genealogy of ideas that runs from Puritanism (Jonathan Edwards, Edward Taylor) to the Transcendentalists (Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman), to Pragmatism (William James, John Dewey) and beyond (the poetry of John Ashbery and Ann Lauterbach, fiction by Marylinne Robinson, among others). A central concern will be how the otherness of the ^new^ world forced the European mind into different patterns of thinking and writing, and the ways that literary aesthetics increasingly came to negotiate scientific claims on belief and new understandings of nature and the self. Class Presentation and Final Paper (15-20 pages). Intended Audience: PhD/ThD, MA/MJT, MDiv.

WILLIAM BLAKE & COUNTERCLTRE (RAHS-5430)

Credits:3

WILLIAM BLAKE & COUNTERCULTURE As one of the most iconic figures associated with Anglo-Romanticism, William Blake offers a rich opportunity for theorizing the relationship between religion, art and literature. This seminar proposes reading Blake ^theologically,^ looking at how his major poems and images were catalyzed by his encounters with heterodox Protestant traditions (such as Swedenborgianism) and various religious cultures outside the pale of Romantic Britain (Hinduism and forms of African spirituality). Blake's religious syncretism will let us explore how he transformed theological tropes-such as prophecy and apocalypse-into radical experimentations with word and image. The course is designed to be an exercise in ^slow reading^-long, sustained attention to the pleasures and complexities of Blake's poetry, art and prose, with occasional forays into relevant theory and criticism. We will cover the majority of Blake's illuminated books in a roughly chronological fashion, beginning with the Songs and concluding with the singular epic Jerusalem. Significant time will also be spent exploring Blake's sustained (and potentially theological) engagements with Milton (Paradise Lost) and Dante (the Inferno). Along the way, we will glance at more modern and contemporary contexts to consider the ways that Blake has significantly impacted a number of artists and writers associated with 20th century ^counter-cultures,^ from Allen Ginsberg, R. Crumb, to Patti Smith. Presentation, Final Research Paper. Intended Audience: PhD/ThD, advanced MA. [PIN code required]

COMPOSING SACRED SPACES (RALS-1220)

Credits:3

^Art soothes pain! Art wakes up sleepers! Art fights against war & stupidity! ART SINGS HALLELUJA!^ - Peter Schumann, Glover, VT 1984 Art within the context of a Christian worship space has the potential to be transformative and healing, inspirational and meditative, educational and democratizing. It can be a powerful way to bring us closer to God. The goal of this part-workshop, part-art history course is to prepare and empower students to make aesthetic decisions for their churches and worship spaces by providing historical background and practical tools for locating and commissioning ecclesiastical artists. We will consider the iconographic content, use, and reception of chapel and shrine decorations, religious statues, icons, Stations of the Cross, textiles such as altar cloths and banners, and windows. Seminar format with in-class discussion and weekly reading assignments. Students will be evaluated through a project detailing their own ^mock-up^ design of a worship space (70% of final grade), class participation (10% of final grade), and an oral presentation on a historical issue relating to liturgical art and/or the spiritual role of matter (20% of final grade). Intended audience: MDiv, ThD, MTS, STD.

SINGING THRU THE CHURCH YEAR (RALS-1727)

Credits:1.5

Students will sing and read through the Christian year from Advent to Pentecost making use of the resources in a variety of recent hymnals and hymn collections. During each class session we'll sing and discuss several dozen hymns (and study more hymns between classes) thus getting an overview of the hymnody of several Christian faith traditions. Looking for the best and most singable congregational songs in all musical styles, we'll develop a sense of how to choose songs and hymns for authentic worship during the various seasons of the liturgical year.

COMPOSING SACRED SPACES (RALS-2220)

Credits:3

^Art soothes pain! Art wakes up sleepers! Art fights against war & stupidity! ART SINGS HALLELUJA!^ - Peter Schumann, Glover, VT 1984 Art within the context of a Christian worship space has the potential to be transformative and healing, inspirational and meditative, educational and democratizing. It can be a powerful way to bring us closer to God. The goal of this part-workshop, part-art history course is to prepare and empower students to make aesthetic decisions for their churches and worship spaces by providing historical background and practical tools for locating and commissioning ecclesiastical artists. We will consider the iconographic content, use, and reception of chapel and shrine decorations, religious statues, icons, Stations of the Cross, textiles such as altar cloths and banners, and windows. Seminar format with in-class discussion and weekly reading assignments. Students will be evaluated through a project detailing their own ^mock-up^ design of a worship space (70% of final grade), class participation (10% of final grade), and an oral presentation on a historical issue relating to liturgical art and/or the spiritual role of matter (20% of final grade). Intended audience: MDiv, ThD, MTS, STD.

NEW WORSHIP,PREACHING & MEDIA (RALS-2366)

Credits:1.5

A worship transformation is sweeping through the churches bringing new life to some and leaving others behind. Media, art, and technology offer ways for everyone (clergy and laity) to participate creatively in this transformation. In this course, we will use video, the world wide web and other media to create and communicate worship and preaching in the local church and global setting. This is a user friendly hands on course involving both group and individual projects of value in one's life and working situation. No previous training in technology is required. The course may be taken for 1.5 or 3 units depending upon the scope of the student's project.

RITUAL CRAFT AS TRANSFORMTIVE (RALS-4301)

Credits:3

Ritual Craft as Transformative Practice supports students to develop a nuanced understanding of successful ritual structures and empowers them to cultivate and strengthen skills to create and guide ritual. The course is a ritual immersion, with sessions guided as ritual experience. Students are encouraged to deepen their own resonant ritual practices, to experience rituals in contexts new to them and to craft and guide prayer and ceremony for community. Students identify their strengths and edges in ritual crafting and leadership enhance their existing ritual strengths and nurture and build skills in arenas in which they seek additional growth and experience. Course topics include Ritual Form, Flow and Intention; Ritual and the Body; Ritual and the Earth; Ritual, Revolution and Counter-Oppression; Ritual, Prayer and the Divine; Personal & Communal Ritual; Altar-Practice and Tending Sacred Space; and Initiation and Life-Cycle Ceremony. [20 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

JESUS AND THE MOVIES (RANT-1153)

Credits:3

How do we picture Jesus? What makes a representation ^believable^? Can a movie fulfill the expectations we bring to a Jesus story? What happens when a sacred text is translated into popular image? Does cinema bring something new to our understanding of Jesus? Combining biblical criticism, Christology, art history, and cinema studies, this course examines numerous clips from 19 Jesus movies made between 1912 and 2014, showing how perennial issues of interpretation and representation are both repeated and transformed by the medium of film. Class meets weekdays, 1/8/18-1/19/18, from 9am-1pm, at JST 217. No meeting on M 1/15/18.

THEATER AND SOCIAL CHANGE (RARS-1500)

Credits:3

The class will be taught in a workshop format. Following study and discussion of selected dramatic pieces focusing on plot, characterization, and dialogue, students will formulate and submit their own theater projects (either individual or group efforts) directed toward specific goals of social transformation. Projects will focus on theater's ability to vividly portray negative circumstances in society involving violations of commonly accepted conditions of justice. Examples include prejudice or intolerance based on social standing, race, gender preference, or religion. Students will demonstrate how their projects embody human goals and needs. Students will present their projects in various venues, approved by the instructor.

Queering Christ in Text and Image (RARS-2001)

Credits:1.5

Who do you say that I am?” Matthew’s Jesus asked that question of his disciples (Mt 16:15). Many different answers and approaches to that question have appeared over the centuries since then. The question itself both expands and deepens when accompanied by visual engagements and responses. This course combines a variety of images and texts in an exploration of how “queer” Christ appears outside the “standard” or dominant representations of Jesus, and then further, how this queerness can inspire and inform movements of liberating social change. The co-teachers of this course will offer their expertise in Christology, queer theory, and the visual arts to invite an approach to social transformation rooted in historical traditions and contemporary insights. Beyond white, heterosexual maleness, who do you say Jesus is? MDIV Elective, CSR, MTS

SEXUALITY IN SACRED ART (RARS-2321)

Credits:3

Many of the earliest known works of art created by humans were both sacred and sexual and this connection between the two themes has continued through the ages. Some cultures have used art to show how sex and the sacred are inseparable while others have used it to distinguish between the body and spirit. We'll use visual communications and art as lenses to consider how different cultures, religions and time periods have understood, regulated, and celebrated human sexuality and our bodies. Art has also had an enormous influence on theological understandings of the body; for example, images of Eve and Mary Magdalene have formed popular ideas of who they were and how sexuality is related to sinfulness and redemption. This class will examine a number of themes related to sexuality in sacred art, in both historical and contemporary works, and explore our understandings of sexuality through creative expression. This course will be taught in hybrid format with the majority of course meetings face-to-face on campus and some sessions if online scheduled as synchronous meetings as needed.

DANCE AND RELIGION (RARS-4006)

Credits:3

This course theorizes dance and religion as they intersect in various cultural contexts. Through close analytical readings of texts and movement, we will explore the political and historical events that shaped a given religious/spiritual dance form and discuss the contemporary issues that surround its continued practice. Formations such as gender, sexuality, lived religion, nationalism, race, class, post-colonialism, globalization, commercialization, and ritual will inform our understanding of the multiple lenses through which these dances and dancers can be viewed. Fundamental questions will include: What is considered dance, and what is considered religion? How does the practice of dancing (or not) affect people's understanding of their spirituality? How does the political construction of the body within a given culture affect who can dance and how they dance in their religious practice?

SEXUALITY IN SACRED ART (RARS-8321)

Credits:3

Many of the earliest works of art were both sacred and sexual and this connection between the two themes has continued through the ages. Some cultures have used art work to show how sex and the sacred are indistinguishable while others have used it to separate the body and spirit. The ways in which sexuality has been depicted has had an enormous influence on religious understandings of the body; for example, images of Eve and Mary Magdalene have formed popular ideas of who they were and how sexuality is related to sinfulness and redemption. This class will examine a number of themes related to sexuality in sacred art and explore our understandings of sexuality through creative expression. (Themes: Connections between Sex, Spirit and Art; Creation and Fertility; Sin and Redemption; Mysticism and Transcendence; The Sexual Body). NOTE: This course is the ONLINE version of RARS 2321 Sexuality in Sacred Art. Only students taking the course as an online course should register using this course number; all others should register for RARS 2321. This course meets at posted course meeting times using Adobe Connect, and you must be available in your corresponding time zone to participate in class. A webcam, high speed internet connection, and the latest version of Flash is required.

PHOTOGRAPHY AS ECOLGCL MEDTATN (RASP-1109)

Credits:1.5

This course will take a closer look at the person's inner and outer ecological landscapes-- issues pertaining to deep, spiritual movement, and how our spirituality and our lifestyles relate to ecological health. Focus will be on personal transformation as a means to ecological transformation. There will be specific meditations given that will urge the students towards a deeper understanding of their selves and their connection to the ecological landscape. Students will be expected to participate fully in all course activities and to show on-going work in class discussions, to produce a concise photographic project, which may be chosen for a collective exhibition in the Bade, an 8-page research paper, and a 3-page reflection paper on personal processes in terms of course topics.

ART & NATURE (RASP-1170)

Credits:3

...the earth has a soul... These words from the psychiatrist Carl Jung, who was deeply concerned over the loss of our emotional and mythic relationship with nature, lay the foundation for an inquiry into the numinous life of the world we live in. Practices in silence, listening, sensing, movement, and art making will be the tools used to map our awareness of internal and external landscapes. Reading, ranging from native voices to the environmental art field, will provide a variety of perspectives on how contemporary artists turn to nature as inspiration for the creation of art. A modest materials fee will be assessed for this course.

SPIRITUALITY IN 20TH C AM ART (RASP-1806)

Credits:1.5

Twentieth century and twenty-first century artists in America offer a wide variety of spiritual experiences for those who learn to look. With many class sessions in Bay Area Museums, we learn to sense finitude and infinity, control and chance in creation from Pollock, Rothko, Newman, Gottlieb, and Reinhardt (Thomas Merton's close friend); return to earth and pilgrimage from Smithson, de Maria, Christo, Noguchi; sacramental perceptions from Georgia O'Keeffe to Zackheim and Nevelson; post-critical ironic reaffirmation of world from Duchamp to Jasper Johns and reaffirmation of the human body from DeKooning to Segal, De Staebler, Neri and Arneson; and transforming light from Irwin, Turrell, Bell, and Lippold. For 1.5 units, the student writes a brief paper every other week based on viewing a different art work; for 3 units, the students does the bi-weekly papers and a final paper or project.

VISUAL ARTS, SPIRIT, & PLACE (RASP-2358)

Credits:3

American artist Nancy Holt remarked in 1977 that the landscapes she chose for "Light Tunnels," 1977, recalibrated her understanding of the human experience as it related to space and time. Much of the contemporary art in the Americas shares in Holt's broader aesthetic investigation. In this seminar, we will survey how several prominent contemporary artists (from Brazil, Cuba, Mexico, Uruguay, the US, and Venezuela), have creates artworks that-while undoubtedly steeped in a Western secular milieu-have also functioned as a locus for theological inquiry. By analyzing these artist's work, writings, photo documentation, interviews, and ephemera, students will reflect on how such works may be seen as engaging contemporary religious imagination while also contesting the assumption that contemporary society has undergone a definite decline in religiosity and modes of spirituality. In-class presentation and written reflection, final research paper; Intended audience: M.A., M.Div.

CHRISTIAN ART OF ASIA (RASP-3633)

Credits:3

A stereotyped understanding of Asian Christian art, for instance, one featuring an Asian-faced Jesus in tropical surroundings, betrays a notable bias. It illustrates an Asia imagined as an oriental, distant land, rather than an invitation to a renewed creativity or reimaging of Jesus from the contemporary perspective in which Asian Christian art is actually emerging. This course would take the present social-historical context as a starting point to analyze the many ways Christian art of Asia has intertwined inculturation and social-political commitment within a non-Christian world. By using cultural symbols and narratives, this form of art has followed the trends of ethnic concerns, including theories of hybridity, cultural criticism and exchange. Our investigation will privilege Asian aesthetic traditions and movements that are being reinvigorated in contemporary artistic production. For example, we will examine He Qi's Ecce Homo in China, which draws from Chinese literature, while at the same time reconstructing the Christian teaching of crucifixion. Japanese artist Sadao Watanabe's biblical figures appear garbed in kimonos, hinting at a more complex political vision of a nation steeped in Buddhist aesthetics. This course explores manifestations of artistic acculturation in non-Western art history and invites students to examine the Christian message in light of Eastern wisdom and religions. Course requirements include a mid-term presentation, a group facilitation, and a final research paper. This course, taught by a doctoral student in Art and Religion under the supervision of a JST professor in mission studies, is open to MA/MTS, STL, MDiv, and DMin students. Auditors are welcome with permission of the instructors. This course is taught by PhD student Su-Chi Lin with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Eduardo Fernandez.[Auditors with faculty permission]

POETRY & THLGCL IMAGINATION (RAST-2076)

Credits:3

Why do people turn to poems in times of deep grief and human celebration? What makes poetry uniquely fitted to intense experiences of mortality, human love, and sacred experience? How does a poem enact experience while also reflecting on it, i.e. how is a poem's meaning made? In this course we will explore how poetry from diverse sources can be drawn upon for/as personal and public theological reflection. Each week, we'll focus on a different spiritual or theological theme, engaging 3 approaches: 1.) focus on poetic craft, i.e. how language is shaped as the medium of an artistic discipline, studying poems from several traditions, with particular attention to poets in conversation with Christianity; 2.) read and discuss critical essays on craft and theological themes; 3.) participate in an in-class writing workshop, discussing student poems, written to thematic prompts, with attention to image, musicality, form, etc. Students will become alert to theological relations often excluded from systematic theologies and be able to relate craft/technique to ways that poetry not only opens us into widened sacred experience but also articulate complex and otherwise unspoken philosophical/theological insights. Format: seminar. Grading: class participation, 10 assigned poems, 10 page review essay. [12 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

RELIGION AND THE CINEMA (RAST-2300)

Credits:3

Introduction to a “canonical sample” of religious films from the silent era to the modern day. Building on previous film courses taught at GTU, the course will provide a broad spectrum of films from the United States and Europe representing different traditions of Christianity, including Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy, mainline and evangelical Protestantism, and expanding further into the Abrahamic religions of Judaism and Islam.

THEOLOGICAL AESTHETICS (RAST-4300)

Credits:3

THEOLOGICAL AESTHETICS: ART, BEAUTY, AND BEYOND. In this course, students will explore the main issues, ideas, and themes in theological aesthetics. The course pays special attention to the arts and creative expression, yet also to beauty and sublimity in nature, and to problems posed by ugliness and suffering.