Course Information

 

for A. Biblical Studies Department


ELEMENTS OF NT GREEK (BS-1010)

Credits:3

A brief introduction to the Hellenistic Greek language as found in the New Testament. Method: Grammar and syntax; introduction to use of Greek; exegesis. Evaluation: Class participation, exams, short exegesis papers. Intended audience: MDiv. [35 max enrollment; PIN code required]

NT GREEK I: AN INTRODUCTION (BS-1020)

Credits:3

The first part of a two-semester course introducing the skills required to read and interpret New Testament texts in the original Greek. Basic and intermediate grammar and vocabulary on the focus, with an emphasis on acquiring the tools to sight-read texts. Grades will be based on class participation, quizzes, and midterm and final exams. This course is taught by PhD student Laura Jean Torgerson with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Uriah Kim.

NT GREEK II: AN INTRODUCTION (BS-1021)

Credits:3

The second part of a two-semester course introducing the skills required to read and interpret NT texts in Greek. Basic and intermediate grammar and vocabulary are the focus. Grades will be based on weekly assignments, quizes, and two exams. Course taught by PhD student Laura Jean Torgerson with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Uriah Kim.

ECCLESIASTICAL LATIN I (BS-1036)

Credits:3

This first half of a year's course aimed at preparing students to read (with a dictionary) Latin from Vulgate to recent Vatican documents. No prerequisites except rediness to come to class and study two/three hors in preparation. Daily recitation,occasional quizzes, midterm and final. Text: J.F. Collins, ^A Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin^ (CUA Press).

ECCLESIASTICAL LATIN II (BS-1037)

Credits:3

A continuation of Ecclesiastical Latin I. Same text, same requirements. My hope is to finish the Collins Text before the end of the term and have time for reading of real texts from Bible and Christian Latin authors such as Augustine and Aquinas.

BASIC HEBREW I (BS-1120)

Credits:3

An introduction to the basic phonology and morphology of biblical Hebrew. This course or the equivalent is a prerequisite for Basic Hebrew II, the intensive course given in January Intersession.

THE BASICS OF BIBILICAL HEBREW (BS-1124)

Credits:3

This class will cover entire year of grammar, morphology, and syntax of biblical Hebrew in one semester. It will provide at a very fast pace. The desired student is one who is self-motivated, hardworking and ^brave.^ [20 max enrollment/ Sig. on Reg. Card]

ELEMENTARY BIBLICAL HEBREW I (BS-1127)

Credits:3

This is the first half of a year-long course introducing the basic grammar of biblical Hebrew. The course focuses on the basics of phonology (sounds), morphology (forms), and syntax (word order and function) for biblical Hebrew. The primary purpose of this course is to establish a foundational understanding of biblical Hebrew for students pursuing further study of the language. Issues of exegesis and interpretation will be discussed where appropriate, but the main focus of this course will be learning the grammar of biblical Hebrew. [20 max enrollment] NOTE: This course is taught by GTU PhD student Eric Sias with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Uriah Kim.

ELEMENTARY BIBLICAL HEBREW II (BS-1128)

Credits:3

This is the second half of a year long course introducing the basic grammar of biblical Hebrew. The course focuses on the basics of phonology (sounds), morphology (forms), and syntax (word order and function) for biblical Hebrew. The primary purpose of this course is to establish a foundational understanding of biblical Hebrew for students pursuing further study of the language. Issues of exegesis and interpretation will be discussed where appropriate, but the main focus of this course will be learning the grammar of biblical Hebrew. [BS 1127 or equivalent; 20 max enrollment] NOTE: This course is taught by GTU PhD student Eric Sias with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Uriah Kim.

BIBLICAL HEBREW I (BS-1135)

Credits:3

This is the first half of a six-week intensive course in which students will work through an entire first-year Hebrew grammar book, preparing them to enter an Intermediate Hebrew class upon completion of the course. Students who plan to take the entire course should sign up for both Hebrew I and Hebrew II. By the end of the two-part course, students will have acquired a command of the basic principles of Hebrew phonology, morphology and syntax. Students will be able to translate the text of the Hebrew Bible with the aid of lexicons and other grammatical resources. Class meets weekdays, 6/30/14-7/18/14, from 9:00am-1:00pm, at MUDD 204. [Auditors excluded]

BIBLICAL HEBREW II (BS-1136)

Credits:3

This is the second half of a six-week intensive course in which students will work through an entire first-year Hebrew grammar book, preparing them to enter an Intermediate Hebrew class upon completion of the course. Students who plan to take the entire course should sign up for both Hebrew I and Hebrew II. By the end of the two-part course, students will have acquired a command of the basic principles of Hebrew phonology, morphology and syntax. Students will be able to translate the text of the Hebrew Bible with the aid of lexicons and other grammatical resources. Class meets daily, 7/21/2014-8/8/2014, from 9:00am-1:00pm at MUDD 204. [Auditors excluded]

USING BIBLICAL LANGUAGES (BS-1250)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to the fundamental skills of biblical interpretation including basic Greek and Hebrew analysis of biblical texts, the use of key Hebrew and Greek grammatical and lexical aids in both print and electronic resources. Students will also be introduced to basic linguistic theory and a wide range of methods of biblical criticism. Required course for MDiv students. This course will be taught in Spring 2019 by PhD student Eric Sias with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of LeAnn Flesher.

ART AND TECHNIQUE OF EXEGESIS (BS-1500)

Credits:1.5

THE ART AND TECHNIQUE OF EFFECTIVE EXEGESIS AND CRITICAL WRITING This course is a hands-on, practical introduction to the process of crafting effective exegesis and other critical academic writing. Students will learn or review all aspects of the critical- writing process, from topic to final draft, and will incrementally produce a scholarly paper to be submitted at semester's end. Format: Lecture, discussion, in-class exercise. Evaluation: Active class participation, completion of weekly reading and writing assignments, submission of minimally B-level final paper. This course is designed in conjunction with PSR's OTNT 1700/NTOT 1701 sequence to teach students how to write exegetical papers; however, the course is open to any PSR student wishing to improve the skills essential to successful academic writing. PSR students only. Pass/Fail only. [25 max enrollment]

INTERMEDIATE HEBREW I (BS-2002)

Credits:3

The goals of this course are: to continue the study of Hebrew in 2 semesters of Elementary Hebrew (building vocabulary, morphology, syntax) and to read significant prose sections of the Hebrew Bible. At conclusion of semester course students will have developed greater proficiency in Biblical Hebrew narrative (oral reading and translation). Regular reading (oral) and translation, weekly quiz on vocabulary & morphology. [2 semesters Elementary Hebrew; Auditors with faculty permission]

INTERMEDIATE HEBREW READING II (BS-2004)

Credits:3

The course will focus on 1 Samuel, expecting students to translate and comment on that book at an appropriate level. Each class will manage about twenty verses. Grammar and syntax will be discussed, with emphasis on clauses. There will be daily verbal participation, quizzes, a midterm and a final. The course is intended for those planning to use Hebrew in doctoral studies, or to complete a MABL requirement. [One semester of intermediate Hebrew; Auditors excluded]

BIBLCL INTERP:TEXT TO SERMON (BS-2119)

Credits:3

The proper interpretation of the Bible is essential for all preachers because the Bible is the most important resource for Christian preaching and teaching. In this regard, the course is designed to provide students with the theory and application of biblical interpretation and prepare biblical sermons through assignments and workshops. NOTE: This course will be taught in Korean.

INTRO TO SWEDNBRGIAN EXEGESIS (BS-2450)

Credits:3

THIS IS AN ONLINE COURSE. After an introductory effort to locate Swedenborgian exegesis in the contexts of biblical scholarship, Swedenborgian theology, personal spirituality, and pastoral ministry, the course will deal with basic issues of methodology. It will proceed from the interpretation of passages treated "seriatim" by Swedenborg to passages the receive little or no comment in the published theological works. [8 max enrollment]

THE BIBLE AND MYTHOLOGY (BS-2608)

Credits:3

This class focuses on the overt biblical material which is mythological in nature, as well as the use of the genre of mythology generally as a methodology to explore the biblical text. The class will be more focused on the Hebrew Bible, but it will also cover aspects of the New Testament. The first half of the semester this class will concentrate on the connection of the biblical material with mythological texts from ancient Near Eastern literature; the second half of the semester the approach will be topical (The heroic, magic etc.), incorporating mythological material from a wider milieu. While the primary approach of the class is literary, the idea of history (historicity, historiography) will also be considered, as well as theories regarding the practice and development of religion. The course is a seminar that will meet once a week for three hours; evaluation is based on a short paper, a long paper, an oral presentation, and active involvement in discussion. The course is intended for either MA or MDiv students who wish to pursue critical engagement with the biblical text from literary, historical, and religious perspectives. There are no prerequisites for enrolling in the course. This course fulfills the second OT requirement for SFTS students. [15 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

EMERGING ISSUES (BS-5501)

Credits:3

This course will explore the representation of race/ethnicity in the Bible and the ancient Near Eastern and Greco-Roman cultures that produced it. Since this is a relatively new field of study in antiquity, students will be doing original research and working together to develop paradigms for understanding the concepts in the Bible. Grades based on active class participation in this seminar course, oral presentation(s), and a research paper. Intended audience: MA, PhD. [PIN code required]

TEXTS AND METHODS (BS-6005)

Credits:3

Older and newer methods of analyzing and interpreting the Hebrew Bible will be examined. The book of Judges, the text and academic analyses and research on the book, will serve as basis for understanding and discussion of these approaches. Course meets in GTU Dean's Office in Flora Lamson Hewlett Library. [Faculty Consent required; 10 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

INTRODUCTORY BBLCL LANGUAGES (BS-8100)

Credits:3

This course introduces participants to the learning and use of Biblical languages through Bible Software. Participants will learn the basic morphology, syntax, and grammar of Biblical Hebrew and Biblical Greek in order to deploy this learning in the use of software. The course aims to equip participants with the initial skills needed to perform exegesis. Participants will be assessed by short quizzes, written assignments, and practice sessions. Course meets online, 1/2/18 to 1/19/18.

SWDNBRGIAN BIBLCL EXEGESIS I (BS-8250)

Credits:3

This seminar is offered via video conference, time and day TBD. After an introductory effort to locate Swedenborgian exegesis in the contexts of biblical scholarship, Swedenborgian theology, personal spirituality, and pastoral ministry, the course will focus on fundamental principles that may give coherent meaning to the biblical narrative with a view to finding coherent meaning in the narratives of our own lives. By the close of the course, students should have the beginnings of an exegetical methodology that appropriately blends discipline and intuition in the interpretation of the Bible for personal spiritual growth and constructive community involvement and for related pastoral and homiletical purposes. Active participation, mid-term and final papers. MDiv, MTS. Can be upgraded for DMin. [6 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

SWDNBRGIAN BIBLCL EXEGESIS II (BS-8251)

Credits:3

This is the second semester of a two semester course. This course meets via Videconference. Please see prerequisite below. After an introductory effort to locate Swedenborgian exegesis in the contexts of biblical scholarship, Swedenborgian theology, personal spirituality, and pastoral ministry, the course will focus on fundamental principles that may give coherent meaning to the biblical narrative with a view to finding coherent meaning in the narratives of our own lives. The central issue common to both narratives is taken to be the changing nature of a covenantal relationship between Deity and humanity as it affects the formation of human community, leading to the assumption that particular episodes have meanings that can be seen only when they are viewed in that narrative context. By the close of the course, students should have the beginnings of an exegetical methodology that appropriately blends discipline and intuition in the interpretation of the Bible for personal spiritual growth and for pastoral and homiletical purposes. Students should be aware of the extensive Swedenborgian collateral literature and of the skills necessary for its responsible use. Students will be responsible for regular attendance at video conference sessions, for the timely completion of weekly reading assignments, and for active and thoughtful participation in class discussion. There will be midterm and final papers.

BALDWIN, BIBLE & SOCIAL JUSTC (BS-8626)

Credits:3

James Baldwin's biblical canon in ^Go Tell It on the Mountain^ and ^The Fire Next Time^ will be explored to identify his use of OT/NT texts to carve out a unique expression of social justice. Baldwin's texts, including texts to be selected by students, will help each participant to develop their own Baldwinian applied justice portfolio. For DMin level students.

BIBLCL FNDTNS OF SOC JUSTICE (BSCE-2260)

Credits:3

Study of those major biblical texts and themes which are important for the formation of religious attitudes and conscience on issues of social and economic justice. Requirements: Frequent short papers on texts and secondary readings and final paper.[31 max enrollment]

TEACHING BIBLE & SEXUALITY (BSED-3120)

Credits:3

This workshop style course will help students develop plans and expertise for teaching Bible studies or workshops within their own faith communities on issues related to the Bible and sexual orientation/gender identity/sexual ethics. The course will not only outline the particular issues and questions that need to be addressed in such contexts but also discuss the elements of good teaching and the process of course planning and layout. Students will be given the opportunity to practice some of their learning in front of the class for evaluation and feedback. Requirements include oral presentations, critical review papers, and a completed course plan for presenting the material in a particular setting. [20 max enrollment; OT 1115 or its equivalent or NT 1016 or its equivalent]

HISTORY OF BIBLE TRANSLATION (BSHR-4530)

Credits:3

This course will explore the history of Bible translation from antiquity to our own day, focusing on translation as political and cultural as well as linguistic negotiation. Our goals will be to understand the historical emergence of major Bible translations and to acquire methodological tools drawn from translation studies to enable us to analyze these translations. [Auditors with Faculty permission]

LOST GODDESS (BSHS-2005)

Credits:1.5

LOST GODDESS: THE LIFE AND DEATH OF THE DIVINE FEMININE IN THE BIBLICAL WORLD One of the most vexing problems of the monotheisms of the Western world is their emphasis on an aggressively masculine characterization of the Deity. While most of us nominally accept the Deity as genderless, we are still subject to the millennia-old stereotype: whether God the Judge, God the Warrior, or God in most any other guise, so many of us still consciously or subliminally call the Deity "He". In the early Biblical world, the situation was both more vague and more nuanced. Scanning through the religious lives of Egyptians, Mesopotamians, Hittites, Canaanites and even Israelites, there were a generous number of goddesses. Who were they and what can we learn about them? What were their shared and distinct traits? How did the divine feminine manifest itself in Biblical Israel from its origins to the destruction of Solomon's Temple? And finally: what was the fate of the divine feminine and what were the consequences for Western monotheism? Our course will explore all these questions, integrating both Near Eastern texts and archaeology to search for answers. In a collaborative environment, students will analyze the data to create their own understanding of the character of the divine feminine in Near Eastern/Biblical cultures and the process that led to its disappearance. Course meets daily, 7/27/15- 7/31/15, from 1:30pm-5:30pm, at MUDD 103. NOTE: For registration & summer session policies, see www.psr.edu/summer.

PROFILES IN BIBLICAL LEADRSHP (BSHS-2551)

Credits:1.5

The Hebrew Bible is a treasure trove of didactic stories about Biblical leaders, from kings and warriors to prophets and priests. It presents inspiring accounts of faith and courage in the face of impossible odds, as well as resourcefulness in making the most of available opportunities. But it also often offers blunt assessments of leaders' misguided motivations and failures. Our goal in this course is nothing less than time travel: to discover the source stories of Biblical leaders and how they were interpreted over the centuries to inspire and guide later generations in the Biblical era. NOTE: This course is the face-to-face version of Profiles in Biblical Leadership. Only students taking the course in Berkeley should register using this course number; distance students should register for the online version. For registration & summer session policies, see www.psr.edu/summer. Class meets daily, 7/28/14-8/1/14, from 1:30pm-5:30pm at Bade Museum. [Auditors excluded]

HISTORY OF ISRAEL (BSHS-2620)

Credits:3

THIS CLASS IS BEING OFFERED IN KOREAN The previous generation of scholarship on the history of Israel focused on the historical- critical approach. Contemporary scholarship is focused on the ^interpretation of the history^ in the Bible given to the ancient Israelites based on the interpretational dynamics of the Creation and the Exodus, the two major theological points that the writers of the Old Testament and the New Testament significantly applied in their contextual settings. This course, to be taught in Korean, will briefly review the history of the historical studies of ancient Israel and discuss the need for a new method in the study of the history of ancient Israel. The Old Testament is ^a^ history of Israel based on faith in their God, Yahweh. The Old Testament does not merely contain ^history,^ (some examples include: the Deuteronomistic History and the Chronicler's History) but is itself ^a^ history. The history depicted in the Old Testament is ^biblical history.^ In this class, we will seek to define biblical history, and how it differs from ^secular^ history. NOTE: Class begins 9/16/10.

INTRO TO RABBINIC LITERATURE (BSHS-3320)

Credits:3

This class will serve as an introduction to rabbinic literature and history. We will consider the development of rabbinic Judaism in its late-antique context and gain familiarity with the primary collections of rabbinic literature: the Talmud and Midrash. Some themes that we will explore include rabbinic Biblical hermeneutics, the origins of rabbinic law, the rise of rabbinic authority and rabbinic constructions of gender.

JEWS CHRISTIANS AND THE BIBLE (BSHS-5100)

Credits:3

The last quarter of a century has seen a proliferation of research on the history of the intersection between Jewish and Christian biblical interpretation. New perspectives on identity formation, anti-Judaism, philosemitism, and Christian Hebraism, for instance, have advanced our understanding of the history of the discourses between and within Judaism and Christianity. This class will survey the scholarly literature in this field, and critically engage various methodologies at work in this literature. Therefore, in addition to a study of Christian and Jewish interpretation of the Bible and of each other throughout history, this class will investigate the scholarly discourse of our own day.

LOST GODDESS (BSHS-8205)

Credits:1.5

LOST GODDESS: THE LIFE AND DEATH OF THE DIVINE FEMININE IN THE BIBLICAL WORLD One of the most vexing problems of the monotheisms of the Western world is their emphasis on an aggressively masculine characterization of the Deity. While most of us nominally accept the Deity as genderless, we are still subject to the millennia-old stereotype: whether God the Judge, God the Warrior, or God in most any other guise, so many of us still consciously or subliminally call the Deity "He". In the early Biblical world, the situation was both more vague and more nuanced. Scanning through the religious lives of Egyptians, Mesopotamians, Hittites, Canaanites and even Israelites, there were a generous number of goddesses. Who were they and what can we learn about them? What were their shared and distinct traits? How did the divine feminine manifest itself in Biblical Israel from its origins to the destruction of Solomon's Temple? And finally: what was the fate of the divine feminine and what were the consequences for Western monotheism? Our course will explore all these questions, integrating both Near Eastern texts and archaeology to search for answers. In a collaborative environment, students will analyze the data to create their own understanding of the character of the divine feminine in Near Eastern/Biblical cultures and the process that led to its disappearance. Course meets daily, 7/27/15-7/31/15, from 1:30pm-5:30pm, at MUDD 103. NOTE: This course is the ONLINE version of BSHS-2005, Lost Goddess. Only students taking the course as an online course should register using this course number; all others should register for BSHS-2005. This course meets at posted course meeting times using Adobe Connect, and you must be available in your corresponding time zone to participate in class. A telephone, webcam, high speed internet connection, and the latest version of Flash are required. NOTE: For registration & summer session policies, see www.psr.edu/summer.

EARLY CHRISTIANITIES (BSNT-2400)

Credits:3

This intermediate seminar explores early Christian writings - canonical and non-canonical - to investigate the varieties of beliefs and communities during the beginnings of many Christian movements. We'll read early Church Fathers, heresiologists, and the writings of/about supposed ^heretics.^ Students will present on different Christian groups, and we'll consider the formation of beliefs, community, and faith identities in order to better understand these elements at work today. For MDiv and MA students, PhD students have the option to enroll with increased reading and research. [15 max enrollment]

BIBLCL CHRTRS & SOCIAL JUSTICE (BSOT-3500)

Credits:3

This course is a two-week evening summer intensive designed to introduce MDiv students to: 1)the narrative dimensions of biblical literature with special attention paid to biblical characters; as well as 2)exegetical and interpretive investigations of social justice. Two texts serve as the primary reading for the course, the biblical book of Ruth and Jennifer Koosed's Gleaning Ruth: A Biblical Heroine and Her Afterlives. These texts will guide a trajectory of the course in terms of characters under investigation (e.g. Ruth, Orpah, Boaz, Obed, etc.) and order of social justice topics addressed (e.g. famine and poverties, workers and borderlands, family and dignity, etc.). The course is a combination of lecture and seminar, so students taking the course for credit are expected to do the daily assigned reading, written reflections, and one group presentation. Class meets weekdays, 6/10/13-6/21/13, from 6:10pm-9:40pm at ABSW. [Auditors with faculty permission]

ISRAELITE/JUDEAN RELIGION (BSRA-4130)

Credits:3

This seminar course aims at a fuller understanding of Israelite and Judean religious ideas and practices through critical use of texts from the Hebrew Bible, contemporary epigraphic texts, iconography, and archaeology. The temporal focus will be on the Monarchic, or Iron II, period: 1000-586 BCE. Geographic focus will be on the southern Levant, with comparative look at the religions of the neighboring cultures of Phoenicia, Edom, Moab, and Ammon as a mode for contextualizing contemporary Israelite and Judean religious beliefs and practices. Course requirements include presentations on selected secondary readings, class discussions, and a final research paper on a thematically related topic.

HOUSEHOLD RLGNS ANC ISRAEL (BSRA-5420)

Credits:3

HOUSEHOLD RELIGIONS IN ANCIENT ISRAEL Household religions in ancient Israel and the Near East will investigate religious ideas and practices at the family level. Past scholarship has privileged state run religion or official religion and either downgraded or ignored the family or households. This is due in part to the elite nature of the texts we have preserved in the Hebrew Bible, or the editorial preferences and theologies of ancient editors/authors. Families and households were the basic level of ancient societies, thus their religion gives new insights into diversity in Israelite and Near Eastern religions.

QUEERING THE USE OF THE BIBLE (BSRS-2333)

Credits:3

Session I: Erotic Knowing and Scripture (Section 1) This course will build upon Audre Lorde's concept of "erotic knowledge" as a queer base from which to focus on connecting our own erotic sensibilities directly to biblical texts, constructing matrices of meaning that speak to our individual and shared concerns. A broadly interdisciplinary approach will be employed and warmly welcomed, in working toward paradigms for the use of scriptural texts that are authentically liberative for queers of all sexualities, whether in or out of the academy, in or out of organized religion. Course meets daily, 6/19/17-6/23/17, from 1pm-5pm at MUDD 102. [40 max enrollment] Session I: Erotic Knowing and Scripture & Session II: Suiting Up for Justice-Making (Section 2) This course will build on Audre Lorde's concept of "erotic knowledge" as a queer base from which to utilize biblical texts (which is central to QUB, part I), and go beyond baseline methodological questions to the creative and authentic appropriation and application of biblical texts in the queer pursuit of justice-making. A broadly interdisciplinary approach will be employed and warmly welcomed, in deriving, developing, and adapting tools and capabilities, suggested or even modeled in scriptural texts, for liberation. Course meets daily, 6/19/17-6/30/17, from 1pm-5pm at MUDD 102.[Queering the Use of the Bible Part I or by approval of the instructor]

EZRANEH: SOCRELTRANSFORMATION (BSRS-4050)

Credits:3

This seminar course aims at a fuller understanding of Judean/Jewish social and religious transformations in the Book(s) of Ezra-Nehemiah. We will be approaching this topic through the critical lenses of Postcolonial, Queer, and Minoritized Biblical criticism. The temporal focus will be on the Exilic period-early post Exilic periods, or the Babylonian-Persian periods: 586-333 BCE. Geographic focus will be on the southern Levant, with comparative look at the province of Judah/Yehud in its complicated relationships with the Persian empire. Identities and ethnicities under Empire will be explored in relationship to questions of diaspora, exile, in-group/out-group, and proximate/distant others. Course requirements include presentations on selected secondary readings, class discussions, and a final research paper, sermon, or motivational speech on a thematically related topic. Prerequisite: any introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament .

GENDER, SEXUALITY, BIBLE (BSRS-8220)

Credits:3

This course will explore the intersections between biblical interpretation and issues of gender and sexuality. Students will engage texts from both the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament. They will examine a variety of methods in biblical studies, with a focus on postmodern methods of interpretation. They will also engage in interdisciplinary study of contemporary theories and strategies in the fields of gender and sexuality studies, with a focus on Queer Theory. Finally, they will explore how their studies of biblical texts may contribute to the sometimes-divisive conversations regarding issues of gender and sexuality in contemporary communities. Offered as both a live and online course. NOTE: This course is the ONLINE version of BSRS 2200 Gender, Sexuality, and the Bible. Only students taking the course as an online course should register using this course number; all others should register for BSRS 2200. This course meets asynchronously using Moodle (http://gtu.edu/library/students/moodle-help). High-speed internet connection required. (Occasional synchronous class meetings maybe scheduled; see syllabus for details.)

EXEGETING THE APOCALYPSE (BSSP-2050)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to constructive strategies for interpreting and exegeting the New Testament book of Revelation. While it is intended for students with some exposure to critical methodologies, all students and auditors are welcome. Subjects of discussion include (1) the content and structure of Revelation, (2) its historical origins and contexts, and (3) major modes of interpretation including ancient, medieval, modern, and contemporary perspectives on Revelation. Students will be evaluated through a combination of quizzes, reading responses, a class presentation, and a final paper or project. This course is taught by PhD student Justin Staller with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of James Lawrence.

SWEDENBORGIAN BIBLICAL EXEGES (BSST-2741)

Credits:3

This course will locate Swedenborgian exegesis in the history of biblical interpretation, and consider how it relates to other spiritual sense traditions from biblical religions. Swedenborg’s famous doctrine of correspondences will be explored first in the context of dream interpretation and the interpretation of the natural world, two realms that occupied Swedenborg himself before he turned his methods to the interpretation of the Bible. This “universal rhyming scheme,” as one scholar put it, will then be applied to biblical themes and images, from Genesis to Revelation. Aside from close readings of biblical texts, course material will include Swedenborgian scholarship and homiletical material and non-Swedenborgian interpretation theory. Fundamental interpretive principles will be identified, which give meaning to biblical texts and to human spiritual flourishing. Students will develop an exegetical methodology that blends Swedenborgian tradition and personal intuition, for scholarly, pastoral and homiletical purposes. Assignments will include presentations and a final paper.