Course Information

 

for Education Department


TEACHING MINISTRY OF CHURCH (ED-1030)

Credits:3

This introductory course will explore the theory and practice of the teaching and learning process as it occurs in formal and informal settings within the congregation. Attention will be given to the roles of pastors and other leaders in the life of the church. [Auditors with written permission of the instructor]

CRITICAL RLGS PEDAGOGY:CHRSTN (ED-1135)

Credits:3

This course explores five themes: the who, what, why, where, and how of Christian religious education. Philosophy of education and ministry will be framed through readings, praxis and discussion. The goal is to review and renew each participant's approach to educational ministries in diverse context by critically reflecting on the sometimes uncomfortable relationship between the having of novel/great ideas and pragmatism. Specifically, participants are hoped to be able to: 1. differentiate different approaches to religious education, and understand the fundamentals of critical pedagogy as a framework for religious education; 2. understand the nature of Christian Religious Education and its theological, historical, and educational contexts from critical pedagogical perspective; 3. identify their own assumptions about and approaches to Faith Education, and how these are derived from and influence their own personal, social, political, cultural, racial, and religious contexts; 4. critically evaluate these approaches through readings, lectures, small group work, and other class activities; 5. articulate and develop in a written form their own theology of education; and 6. develop skills to create and facilitate communities of learning and teaching, and, through small group work, learn the basics of curriculum development. A participatory and empowering approach to Critical Christian Religious Pedagogy will be utilized throughout the course. Each participant is strongly encouraged to have a specific educational setting for praxis. [Auditors with faculty permission]

INTRO TO CHRISTIAN EDUCATION (ED-1530)

Credits:3

This course explores five themes: who, what, why, where, and how of Christian religious education. Philosophy of education and parish ministry will be framed through readings, praxis and discussion. The goal is to review and renew each participant's approach to educational ministries by critically reflecting on the sometimes uncomfortable relationship between the having of novel/great ideas and pragmatism.

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION (ED-2000)

Credits:3

Christian Education is a necessary entity in the life of the Church. The Word of God has given Christian guidelines for everyday living and eternal life; a commitment to understand for ourselves and to support others helps to define the roles of Christian educators. The class introduces an integrative and organizational approach to Christian education. Students will be required to seek an understanding of theology as an academic discipline and how it related to their church environment. The goal of the course is to equip students with information and knowledge that will help them to develop an effective Christian Education Program. Class sessions will present lectures, presentaitons, and group discussion.

CHRISTIAN ED IN THE PARISH (ED-2020)

Credits:3

This course provides a basic orientation to Christian educational ministries in a parish setting. Our focus will be toward expanding and enhancing our understanding of the nature and practice of Christian education; exploring in both theory and practice the vocation of teaching; considering what is currently known about how learning occurs; and practicing an ongoing conversation about the meanings of the gospel message. Required of PLTS MDiv students prior to internship. Lecture/discussion, with weekly reflections and final project.

ENGAGING YOUTH/FAMILY MINISTRY (ED-2088)

Credits:1.5

A consideration of the contents, contexts, and practices of effective youth and family ministries in a congegational setting. Emphasis will be given to the study and practice of faith formation and effective teaching and learning practices for children and youth. Students will develop a service learning curriculum to further the faith formation of children and youth.

YOUTH & FAMILY MIN PRACTICUM (ED-2089)

Credits:1.5

For those students working the annual PLTS Spring Youth Retreat. [Faculty permission required]

STORIES WE LIVE BY (ED-2325)

Credits:3

Theology, history and culture shape foundational ^stories^ in which the educational ministry of the church is sustained. Such ^stories^ provide perspectives for the meaning of faith and how faith is to be transmitted from one generation to another. This course will critically survey the use of theological, historical, and cultural interpretation in the construction of those ^stories^ and the transformation of Religious Education. NOT a course in story telling but in ^story^ shaping within historical narratives. [Previous introductory course in theology and history of the Church]

INTRO TO CHRISTIAN EDUCATION (ED-8130)

Credits:3

INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIAN EDUCATION This course explores five themes: who, what, why, where, and how of Christian religious education. Theories and contexts of religious education will be framed through readings, praxis and discussion. The goal is to review and renew each participant's approach to educational ministries by critically reflecting on the sometimes uncomfortable relationship between the having of novel/great ideas and pragmatism. A participatory and empowering approach to religious education will be utilized throughout the course. Each participant is strongly encouraged to have a specific educational setting for praxis. This ONLINE course meets asynchronously using Moodle. It has no required meeting times. High-speed internet connection required. See http://moodle.gtu.edu/mod/resource/view.php?id=227 17 for full technology requirements. Intended audience: MDiv. Class runs 6/9/14-8/15/14. [PIN code required; 20 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

CRITICAL RLGS PEDAGOGY:CHRSTN (ED-8135)

Credits:3

CRITICAL RELIGIOUS PEDAGOGY: A CHRISTIAN APPROACH This course explores five themes: the who, what, why, where, and how of Christian religious education. Philosophy of education and ministry will be framed through readings, praxis and discussion. The goal is to review and renew each participant's approach to educational ministries in diverse context by critically reflecting on the sometimes uncomfortable relationship between the having of novel/great ideas and pragmatism. Specifically, participants are hoped to be able to: 1. differentiate different approaches to religious education, and understand the fundamentals of critical pedagogy as a framework for religious education; 2. understand the nature of Christian Religious Education and its theological, historical, and educational contexts from critical pedagogical perspective; 3. identify their own assumptions about and approaches to Faith Education, and how these are derived from and influence their own personal, social, political, cultural, racial, and religious contexts; 4. critically evaluate these approaches through readings, lectures, small group work, and other class activities; 5. articulate and develop in a written form their own theology of education; and 6. develop skills to create and facilitate communities of learning and teaching, and, through small group work, learn the basics of curriculum development. A participatory and empowering approach to Critical Christian Religious Pedagogy will be utilized throughout the course. Each participant is strongly encouraged to have a specific educational setting for praxis. This ONLINE course meets asynchronously using Moodle (http://gtu.edu/library/students/moodle-help). High-speed internet connection required. (Occasional synchronous class meetings maybe scheduled; see syllabus for details.) NOTE: This course is the ONLINE version of ED 1135, CRITICAL RELIGIOUS PEDAGOGY: A CHRISTIAN APPROACH. Only students taking the course as an online course should register using this course number; all others should register for ED 1135.

RELIGIOUS ED&CRITICALPEDAGOGY (ED-8230)

Credits:3

What is religious education? How have we done and how might we want to do in the future? The course introduces religious education from a perspective of critical pedagogy. Students will explore the six paradigms of religious education (tradition-centered, person-centered, justice-centered, family-centered, faith community-centered, and earth-centered educations) and examine them with critical theories. The class will use the forms of lecture, student presentation, and online discussion. Reading materials include, but are not limited to, the writings of Jack Seymour, Richard Osmer, Thomas Groome, and Mary Elizabeth Moore for RE, and Paulo Freire and bell hooks for critical pedagogy. This is an online course with four plenary sessions via Zoom (every first Tuesday of the month, 5:10pm-6:00pm, Pacific Time). The first plenary session takes place on February 6 at 5:10pm (Pacific Time) and is required for all those who take this class. The meeting access information is in Moodle.

INTRO LIBERAL RELIGIOUS ED (ED-8465)

Credits:3

This online seminar course provides a broad introduction to the theory and practice of liberal religious education, with an emphasis on Unitarian Universalist congregations. Topics include history and philosophy of Unitarian Universalist religious education, teaching and learning, developmental theories, the congregation as an educating community, social justice visions for religious education, current approaches and innovations in religious education for all ages, collegial relationships and professional standards for religious educators, and curriculum resources. The course draws from another by the same name, developed by Betty Jo Middleton, Roberta M. Nelson, Eugene B. Navias, and Judith Mannheim, with support from a St. Lawrence Foundation grant. Open to seminarians, ministers, religious educators, and other lay leaders. [Faculty Consent required; 15 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

TEACHING DIFFICULT TEXTS: (EDBS-4560)

Credits:3

HERMENEUTICAL AND PEDAGOGICAL STRATEGIES This interdisciplinary course is designed for upper level students. It will address hermeneutical and pedagogical as well as theological and ethical issues that faith communities and teachers confront in teaching difficult biblical texts. Examples of difficult texts to be dealt with include those related to sexuality, violence, exclusion, and oppression. Students will be required to plan and teach a 1 1/2 hour class in their faith communities, over the long break from Friday of the second week to Tuesday of the third week. The last two sessions can be spent on processing with the students their teaching experience. Format: Seminar. Evaluation: Class participation, teaching project, and one final synthesis paper. [Intro to Bible; Intro to Religious Education; 20 max enrollment] Class meets M-TH, 7/26/10- 8/5/10, from 1:00pm-5:00pm; and W-TH, 8/11/10- 8/12/10, from 1:00pm-5:00pm. NOTE: For registration, see www.psr.edu/summer.

DECOLONIZING BIBLE STUDY: (EDBS-4563)

Credits:3

This seminar course critically reflects on the contributions and challenges of postcolonial biblical theology. Special attention is given to postcolonial biblical theology's pedagogical implications. Postcolonial biblical scholars emphasize the importance of ^decolonizing^ text, context and methodology - of considering alternative non-Western frameworks for theology and faith formation. In this seminar, participants will apply postcolonial biblical theology to marginalized and mainstream Western faith communities, with attention to curriculum development and the praxis of teaching. Format: Lecture/discussion/small groups; 4 options for papers according to learning style.

DYNAMIC YOUTH MINISTRY (EDFT-8462)

Credits:3

This lively and interactive course grounds participants in philosophical, psychological, programmatic, ethical and theological aspects of youth ministry. Geared toward Unitarian Universalists, but open to all religious or secular affiliations, this course seeks to embody a vision of youth ministry that is a vibrant, robust, and flexible part of every congregation and community. Topics of instruction include leadership and spiritual development, professional support for youth advisors, denominational polity, adolescent life issues, building intergenerational community, and a critical analysis of different models of youth ministry and programming. A foundational course recommended for all religious leaders, both new and old to youth ministry. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

LOVE AND TEACHING THEOLOGY (EDHR-4620)

Credits:3

This course seeks to focus on themes of love and teaching, and in particular teaching theology in order to create a space for questions and discussion of approaches, theory and method for teaching theology, and the ways that love might be manifested through our work as ministers and/or educators. We will include poetry, fiction, artwork, music and scholarly resources in our exploration of love as agape, love as eros, love as knowledge. The materials selected for the course presuppose that unjust social systems prevent us from knowing ourselves and knowing others, and therefore prevent us from being in loving relationship with one another. Inside and outside of the classroom we are interwoven and participating within these social systems and have to take into consideration our position within them at interpersonal, local and international levels, what our praxis of educating in love means within them, and how we might get through and beyond them. So that we learn not only from the texts but also from one another, the classroom time is designed to be discussion-based, in addition to periods of lecture and group work. [15 max enrollment] This course is co-taught by PhD student Elizabeth Ingenthron, with a Newhall Award.