Course Information

 

for A. Ethics and Social Theory Department


INTRO TO CHRISTIAN ETHICS (CE-1051)

Credits:3

INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIAN ETHICS Leading churches, social advocacy groups, and nonprofit organizations through processes of moral discernment and decision-making has never been quite so challenging. Over the past half-century churches have been pushed from their once privileged place at the very center of social and public life to the very margins. In addition, ongoing church scandals and what some view as unwarranted intrusions into the political arena have further eroded the moral authority traditionally accorded to churches, clergy, and other religiously identified leaders and fostered a profound skepticism and even hostility towards organized religion. This entry level course takes seriously the challenges and opportunities for doing Christian Ethics in a Postmodern context. Rather than an ^issues^ or ^rules^ -based approach, the class will focus on the key concepts, tools, and skills that students will need to clarify their own beliefs and perspectives, understand the ^art^ of moral reflection and discernment, and provide ethical leadership and guidance to others. This is a required course for MDiv students. This ONLINE course meets asynchronously using Moodle from 6/4/18 - 6/15/18. It has no required meeting times. High-speed internet connection required.

SEXUAL ETHICS (CE-2008)

Credits:3

This course is a theologically and scientifically informed reflection on major issues in Christian sexual ethics, with an emphasis on the Catholic tradition. Topics include: sex and sexuality, Biblical norms for sex, marriage and divorce, celibacy, homosexuality, pre-marital sex, pornography, contraception, et al. Format is reading/discussion and lecture. Student evaluation will be based on reflection papers on the reading and a final paper on a related topic of the student's choice. [Previous study of fundamental moral theology or a graduate introductory course in ethics; Faculty Consent required]

HEALTH ETHICS (CE-2012)

Credits:3

Health and medicine lie at the intersection of thea/ologies, morals, and our bodies. This course provides a foundation in bioethics and the complexities of health, illness and health care. Students develop the ability to apply ethical theory and biopolitical knowledge to key health issues, such as end-of-life decision-making, patient-provider relationships, responsible research, genetic/reproductive technologies, and the care of vulnerable populations, organ donation, and crisis medicine. The course includes a significant ^laboratory^ component, in which students develop and lead hands-on analysis of key concepts and ethical problems in order to produce valuable arguments for bioethical debate as well as pastoral leadership. Course meets daily, 1/16/2018-1/20/2018, from 9:00am to 5:00pm in the SKSM Reading Room. [Auditors excluded]

FUNDAMENTAL MORAL THEOLOGY (CE-2056)

Credits:3

This course explores fundamental concepts of Roman Catholic moral theology, including: moral anthropology; the use of Scripture in morals; the nature and function of moral norms; conscience and its formation; natural law; fundamental option and sin; virtue and the telos of human life, and modes of moral reasoning. Moral theology is fundamentally a discipline of practical reasoning: these concepts will be addressed in the context of concrete cases and issues as well as at the abstract and theoretical level. Format is lecture/discussion, and student evaluation will be based on 3 essay examinations, with the option of writing a research paper in place of second two exams. This course meets the requirements of an Introductory course in the JST MDiv curriculum.

INTRO TO CHRISTIAN ETHICS (CE-2065)

Credits:3

This course introduces the field of Christian ethics by (1) studying major theoretical approaches, in particular focusing upon Anglican and Lutheran conceptions, and (2) exploring how Christians might address contemporary ethical issues. The course thus aims to advance students' historical and theoretical knowledge but to do so in a way that provides resources for contemporary moral decision-making and pastoral leadership. The structure of the course will combine lectures with class discussions throughout. Evaluation will be based upon a vocabulary quiz, a mid-term paper, a final paper, and class participation. [Faculty Consent Required; 30 max enrollment] NOTE: this course is jointly offered by CDSP & PLTS.

SOIL TO THE SOUL (CE-2490)

Credits:3

What role does theology and the faith community play in shaping a more just and sustainable future? While environmental stewardship and urban gardening have become fashionable, in the faith community the issues of justice and equity have often gone overlooked. This course will examine - what are the Biblical and theological connections to environmental justice and food security? Understanding the intersection of environmental justice and faith challenges us to not only examine the effects of global warming, food toxins, habitat loss, and pollution on the Earth, but it should invoke a social, ethical and theological critique about the impact of environmental devestation on poor and disenfranchised communities throughout the world. How do the justice demands of the Gospel, the doctrines of the Church, and humanity's relationship to the natural world frame our understanding of environmental justice? This course will challenge students to examine environmental justice as an ethical and theological issue with regard to poverty, racism, gender-bias, and food security in this age of globalization, as we pursue a more equitable world. Course meets weekdays 7/7/14-7/18/14, from 6:10-9:40pm, at ABSW.

ETHICS & ECONOMICS (CE-2500)

Credits:3

This course brings the insights of religious social ethics and Christian theology to bear on current economic realities. How may we relate the tradition of Christian reflection on economic justice (such as the documents of modern Catholic social teaching) to the task of advancing justice for individuals, social groups and entire societies? Students will develop their skills in social analysis and the application of theological principles. They will contribute to group presentations that help their classmates explore the justice dimensions of such realities as the globalization of markets, environmental degradation, international financial institutions, social inequality and migration. We will consider threats to authentic human development such as poverty, terrorism, and consumerism as well as public policies that address these concerns in a prudential way. Expect a combination of lecture, seminar format and student presentations. Requirements will be tailored for students in any masters or doctoral program.

ETHICS & SPIRITLTY OF MNSTRY (CE-2523)

Credits:3

What makes a good minister? What makes a bad minister? Who do you hope to become in the course of your ministry? What sustains and enlivens pastoral ministry? What particular issues and concerns are of significance in the practice of ministry? In this course, we will bring into dialogue aspects of the ethics and spirituality of ministry in the context of pastoral practice. The aim is to develop an account of some of the virtues relevant to pastoral ministry. This account should both reflect the best aspects of the ministers who have been formative for us, and serve as a guide in our own future practice of ministry. Class is taught in seminar format; grades will be based on reflection papers and a final paper on a topic of the student's choice. [Graduate introductory course in ethics or moral theology; 15 max enrollment; PIN code required]

ROMAN CATHOLIC SEXUAL ETHICS (CE-3011)

Credits:3

This course will treat the major issues in Roman Catholic sexual ethics since the Second Vatican Council. The principal themes discussed will include an historical overview of pre-conciliar sexual ethics, development of major shifts in traditional sexual ethics, teachings of the Magisterium, dissent and conflicts with some magisterial positions. Special attention will be given to moral methodology and pastoral application (using cases) in the areas of marital ethics, regulation of births, sexual abuse, abortion, reproductive technologies, homosexual ethics and sexual celibacy. Class format will be lecture, questions, and small-group discussion. Oral mid-term, one short reflection paper, two written case-studies, and a final paper or project.

EARTH ETHICS AS JUSTICE ETHCS (CE-3080)

Credits:3

This course addresses the unprecedented moral challenge facing humankind in the early 21st century. The challenge is to forge ways of living that Earth can sustain while also building social justice between and among societies. The course engages that challenge through the lens of Christian ethics. The complex intertwining of ecological destruction with racism and economic injustice on local and global scales will be a central focus. Methodological resources include liberation ethics, Earth ethics, inter-faith perspectives, eco-feminist perspectives, and eco-hermeneutics. The informing undercurrent of the course is the quest for hope and moral-spiritual agency in the face of seemingly insurmountable obstacles. The course functions as a seminar in which all participants are responsible for leading class discussion of readings. [30 max enrollment]

CHRISTIAN SOCIAL ETHICS (CE-3230)

Credits:3

This course will consider the tradition of Roman Catholic Social Teaching and modern social ethics. Issues to be treated will include Christian interpretations of violence and non-violence, war and peace, social reconciliation, global and domestic justice, human rights, bioethics, and ecological ethics. In assessing these issues, we will consider the interpretative perspectives of a consistent life ethic, liberation theology and Christian feminism. Lecture/discussion. Evaluation: Regular attendance and participation; midterm oral examination; final open-book examination (10-15 page research paper in lieu of examinations possible for MA students). Intended audience: MDiv, MA/MTS, STL. [Faculty Consent required]

HEALTH ETHICS (CE-4703)

Credits:3

Health and medicine lie at the intersection of thea/ologies, morals, and our bodies. This course provides a foundation in bioethics and the complexities of health, illness and health care. Students develop the ability to apply ethical theory and biopolitical knowledge to public health and clinical issues. Topics include: end-of-life decision-making, the care of vulnerable populations, genetic/reproductive technologies, and organ donation. The course includes a laboratory component; in which students lead analysis of key concepts and ethical problems in order to produce valuable arguments for bioethical debate as well as pastoral leadership. This course has four components: (1) pre-reading and assessment; (2) a collaborative story-catching project; (3) week-long January intensive; and (4) a final research paper, or case analysis on three bioethics topics due early February. [Faculty Consent required; 25 max enrollment; Auditors excluded] Class meets daily, 1/25/2016-1/29/2016, from 9:00am-5:00pm at SKSM.

THEORIES OF JUSTICE (CE-5005)

Credits:3

This course is a Doctoral and advanced Masters level seminar offering a comparative assessment of distributive justice. Liberal, libertarian, communitarian, feminist, and liberationalist theories will be explored. The seminar is intended primarily, but not exclusively for PhD., Thd. STD, STL and advanced Masters students. Regular attendance and participation in seminar; final research paper of 20 pages. [Faculty consent required; 15 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

INTRO TO CHRISTIAN ETHICS (CE-8147)

Credits:3

INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIAN ETHICS Leading churches, social advocacy groups, and nonprofit organizations through processes of moral discernment and decision-making has never been quite so challenging. Over the past half-century churches have been pushed from their once privileged place at the very center of social and public life to the very margins. In addition, ongoing church scandals and what some view as unwarranted intrusions into the political arena have further eroded the moral authority traditionally accorded to churches, clergy, and other religiously identified leaders and fostered a profound skepticism and even hostility towards organized religion. This entry level course takes seriously the challenges and opportunities for doing Christian Ethics in a Postmodern context. Rather than an ^issues^ or ^rules^ -based approach, the class will focus on the key concepts, tools, and skills that students will need to clarify their own beliefs and perspectives, understand the ^art^ of moral reflection and discernment, and provide ethical leadership and guidance to others. This is a required course for MDiv students. This ONLINE course meets asynchronously using Moodle from 6/4/18 - 6/15/18. It has no required meeting times. High-speed internet connection required.

INTRO TO CHRISTIAN ETHICS (CE-8210)

Credits:3

This online course introduces the field of Christian ethics by (1) studying major theoretical approaches, in particular focusing upon Anglican and Lutheran conceptions, and (2) exploring how Christians might address contemporary ethical issues. The course thus aims to advance students' historical and theoretical knowledge but to do so in a way that provides resources for contemporary moral decision-making and pastoral leadership. The course will be conducted online and asynchronously. Students will be required to read assigned texts, submit reflection papers on a regular basis, participate in online discussions, and write a final paper. NOTE: This course is jointly offered by CDSP & PLTS. [30 max enrollment]

ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS (CE-8250)

Credits:3

An introduction to Christian ethics and to the literature of environmental ethics. Fulfills SFTS requirement for ethics elective, plus some other schools' requirements. We will use public policy, philosophical, and theological perspectives to approach ecological questions. Focus issue this semester is climate change. Assignments include mid-term exam plus final paper.

BIBLICAL ETHICS ANALYSIS/ADVOC (CEBS-4303)

Credits:3

BIBLICAL ETHICS: ANALYSIS & ADVOCACY Anyone who reads the Bible does so from a particular social location. We are all born into an on-going society that shapes us. When we turn our attention to the biblical text as the source of our ethical perspectives, we participate in a dialogue between the written word and the meanings our community taught us to give to these words. Many of us have been taught to read the Bible through the eyes of white, middle-class heterosexual males. Yet, can the text liberate those who are oppressed? To do so, it must be read with the eyes of the disenfranchised. This course will explore how the Bible can be used to bring about justice for those who suffer due to their disenfranchisement and dispossession. The aim of this survey course is to enable students to accomplish the following goals: First, to read the Bible from the perspectives of those suffering from race, class and gender oppression. Second, to investigate Biblical protest narratives as ethical praxis this can lead toward resistance and struggle against domination and oppression. Third, introduce ethical reflections about contemporary moral issues in a global context drawing on ethical and social theory and analysis, and on theological and biblical perspectives. Finally, to examine various liberationist Biblical interpretations as a source for overcoming dominant religious power structures. Class meets daily, 7/22/13-8/2/13, from 9:00am-1:00pm, at PSR. (This course may be taken in full, or you may take only week 1, Analysis, beginning July 22, or only week 2, Advocacy, beginning July 29)

THEO/MINISTRY OF MIGRATION (CEFT-2105)

Credits:3

Not since the Second World War has the planet experienced such massive migrations or displacement of persons. Fueled by violence, war, economic hardship, and quest for human freedoms, these persons created in the image of God often fleeing deplorable conditions, call for a response from world communities. This course focuses on the biblical, theological, ethical, and pastoral issues surfacing from these situations. Beginning with a review of the theological literature which has surfaced in recent decades about this phenomenon, it aims to explore possible pastoral responses through the see-judge- act praxis model. Engaging a lecture-seminar format, it will include films, guest speakers, and a final research paper/project, along with a few minor assignments. Students may upgrade for certain programs and auditors are welcome with the permission of the instructors.

FAITH,FOOD & ENVIRON JUSTICE (CEFT-2701)

Credits:3

This course will challenge students to examine environmental justice as an ethical and a theological issue with regard to poverty, racism, gender-bias, and food security in the age of globalization as we pursue a more equitable world. Class session will be held Friday evenings: February 24, March 10 & 24, April 7 & 21. Finally, students will have the opportunity to participate in the Center for Food, Faith & Justice Environmental Justice Symposium (April 22) on Earth Day as well as two Saturday sessions (April 29 & May 6 ) to create an on-site urban garden at ABSW as a living model of creation care, food security and environmental justice.

RELIGIONLESS CHRISTIANITY (CEHS-3317)

Credits:3

Since the mid-19th century, liberal theologians have contrasted authentic faith and institutional religion. This course will study this trend in modern theology. We will trace the development of non-dogmatic approaches to theology, its relationship to modern science, and its relationship to nationalism, imperialism, globalization, secularization, and cultural pluralism in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will consider neo-Orthodox and ^death of God^ expressions of ^religionless Christianity^ in mid-twentieth century Europe and America. We will study its contribution to the Ecumenical movement and its relationship to ^emergent^ Spirituality today. Figures studied will include the 19th-century Lutheran theologians Richard Rothe and Albrecht Ritschl; the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche; the historian of religion Ernst Troeltsch; the Indian Anglican mendicant Sadhu Sundar Singh; the Catholic adapter of Hindu monasticism Bede Griffith; the dialectical theologians Karl Barth, Paul Tillich, and Dietrich Bonhoeffer; the Anglican theologian J.A.T. Robinson; and the philosophical theologians Mary-Jane Rubinstein. Tutorial format: reading, writing, discussion, final research paper on an original topic related to the course. [Faculty Consent required; 8 max ernrollment]

INTRO TO PASTORAL COUNSELING (CEPS-1500)

Credits:3

1. This course offers an opportunity to learn and practice introductory pastoral counseling skills. The course will include lectures and class discussions about professional ethics, healthy boundary-setting, and counseling theories and practices, balanced with experiential learning activities including enactments and role-plays of situations often encountered in pastoral settings. Students will learn and practice skills in a safe, confidential, and supportive environment. The course will foster multicultural awareness, and introduce students to culturally responsive counseling practices. We will examine intentional and unintentional oppressions and privilege, and become more aware of biases, prejudices, microaggressions, processes of intentional and unintentional oppression and discrimination, and other culturally supported behaviors that are detrimental to the growth of the human spirit. [Faculty Consent required; 16 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

AGING ISSUES & MINISTRY (CEPS-4000)

Credits:1.5

This course is offered in two halves, each of which can be taken on its own. This half of the course will use popular cultural media - primarily film but also popular printed materials to draw attention to important current aging-related issues. ^Getting old^ is associated with many ^loss^ stereotypes: diminished power, physical attractiveness, independence, productivity - we will use popular cultural media to examine these stereotypes in the context of our cultural paradigms that encourage us to understand aging-related issues only as a person's individual problems and ignore systems of privilege and difference. The culturally imposed messages that we absorb implicitly and explicitly from popular media lessen our ability to be effective in our ministries. Bringing them into our awareness helps us counter age-related oppressive belief systems. There will be some reading required beforehand. We will spend our time together reflecting on rhetoric in popular magazines, newspapers, films. [Faculty Consent required; 8 max enrollment; Auditors excluded] Class meets daily, 1/19/2016-1/22/2016, from 9:00am-1:00pm at SKSM Reading Room.

INTRO TO PASTORAL COUNSELING (CEPS-8150)

Credits:3

This online pastoral counseling course will introduce students to culturally responsive counseling practices and foster multicultural awareness. Students will examine societal and institutional structures of power and privilege, and will become more aware of the biases, prejudices, and microaggressions that are detrimental to the growth of the human spirit. Students will study major counseling theories and will practice basic helping skills centered on Person-Centered (Rogerian) counseling and Bowen Family Systems Theory. Contextual pastoral elements will be included, especially in the use of Bowen Family Systems as applied to congregational contexts. This is an asynchronous course, with written lectures with links to videos and online resources. Weekly personal reflections and weekly skill practice exercises will be required, as well as some academic writing. It is an intermediate/advanced course intended for MDiv students and with doctoral upgrade possible. [Faculty Consent required; 24 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

AGING ISSUES & MINISTRY (CEPS-8400)

Credits:1.5

This course can be taken alone, but it is also the second half of a winter semester intensive course. It is suitable for students interested in chaplaincy, pastoral and congregational ministry, as well as for students interested in broader sociological perspectives. We will share our attention between focused pastoral and broader societal aspects of aging. Our culture encourages us to understand aging-related issues only as a person's individual problems and ignore systems of privilege and difference. These misapprehensions lessen our ability to be effective in our ministries. We will touch on ageism/stereotypes; changing roles; spiritual development; loss of independence; paid/unpaid caregivers; dementias; congregational programs; death/dying, both individually and in the broader societal context in which these individual situations and problems are situated. You will be offered a wide variety of readings and resources to use in your own work. This course can be taken as a follow-up to Aging Issues and Ministry, Jan. 2016. {Faculty Consent required; 32 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

INTRO TO COUNSELING THEORY (CEPS-8410)

Credits:1.5

This online theory of counseling course is the first half of a two part theory-and-practicum curriculum. Students taking the online theory component must commit to the 1.5 credit practicum course that will be taught as a residential intensive during 2017 intersession. Students will study major counseling theories, basic helping skills, and professional issues related to the counseling process. The course will foster multicultural awareness, and introduce students to culturally responsive counseling practices. We will examine intentional and unintentional oppressions and privilege, and become more aware of the biases, prejudices, microaggressions, processes of intentional and unintentional oppression and discrimination, and other culturally supported behaviors that can be detrimental to the growth of the human spirit The course will provide the theoretical bases for students to then develop skills in the experiential intensive intersession practicum course. [Faculty Consent required; 24 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

MENTAL DISORDERS & OPPRESSION (CEPS-8499)

Credits:3

This anti-oppression course is designed for those of us who are called to be with people who live with mental disorders. We will spend the semester together exploring the complex world of mental "illness" and its associated problems, pains, and sometimes successes. We will companion each other through the weeks as we scrutinize the ways in which our culture treats people who have been given the label "mentally ill." We will gain an understanding of the new DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) - and the implications of definitions of what behavior is, and now isn't, considered pathological. We will use race/ethnicity; class; age; gender; institutional power as the anti-oppression framework to examine cultural definitions and treatments of people who live with "mental disorders." We will take specific issues (e.g. therapies; treatments; pharmaceuticals; criminal justice; mental health policies; children; youth; veterans) to examine the frameworks' intersections. [PIN code required; 32 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

MENTAL ILLNESS/OPPRESSN IN US (CEPS-8500)

Credits:3

This is an anti-oppression course. We will use the DSM-IV (^Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders^ 4th edition) as a framework to examine diagnoses and characterizations of contemporary ^mental disorders.^ We will use anti-oppression (e.g. race/ethnicity; class; age; gender; war; institutional power) as a framework to examine cultural definitions and treatments of people who live with these ^mental disorders.^ We will take specific issues (e.g. therapies; treatments; pharmaceuticals; medicalization; criminal justice; mental health policies; children; soldiers) to examine the frameworks' intersections. Students will complete the course with a useful, integrated understanding of contemporary systemic and individual realities of mental illness and our institutional systems. [18 max enrollment; PIN code required; Auditors excluded]

ETHICS AT THE MOVIES (CERA-4022)

Credits:3

ETHICS AT THE MOVIES, ETHICS IN MOVIES: WORLD- VIEWS, VALUES AND DECISION-MAKING ON AND OFF SCREEN Through narratives, images and sound movies embody the complex, implicit and explicit values and decision-making processes that are part of the lives of individuals and communities. They are also the expressions of particular worldviews and the fruit of complex artistic, technical and economic decisions with deep ethical implications. This course will discuss movies as an important source for the academic study of ethics and offer tools for critical readings of the ethics of films. The movies chosen will focus on the interconnection of issues such as race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexualities, colonialism, class, economics, abilities, and religious and cultural diversity. Movies from underrepresented minorities and international movies will be preferred. The use of movies in community settings for theological and ethical reflection and grassroots activism will also be explored. Readings from the fields of ethics, theology and film studies. Assigned movies will be on reserve at the library and optional communal screenings will take place weekly on campus. Introductory classes in ethics preferred. [15 max enrollment; PIN code required; Auditors excluded]

THE ^ALLERGY TO THE OTHER^ (CERA-4138)

Credits:3

This advanced seminar will explore the claim that Western culture is characterized by an inability to think of the other as other, a tendency to erase otherness either by assimilation or by annihilation, which Jewish philosopher Emmanuel Levinas--referring to the Western philosophical tradition--aptly defined as ^allergy to the other.^ This course will discuss how Western modern theo/alogies and ethical approaches have reinforced or challenged the ^allergy to the other.^ The authors analyzed are chosen for the prominence that issues surrounding otherness have in their work and represent a variety of perspectives, addressing issues such as race, class, gender, sexuality, abilities, species-ism and non-hegemonic attitudes to otherness are explored. Cinematic representations of the ^other^ and discussions on current events will also enrich our work. Please write to instructor to describe your interest in the class and ask for the PIN. [15 max enrollment; PIN code required; Faculty permission required; Auditors excluded]

THE ETHICS OF THEOSIS (CERS-2020)

Credits:3

This course will explore the Orthodox Christian approach to ethics, based on the doctrine of theosis. The focus will be on understanding the basic vocabulary, tools, and sources of Orthodox ethics, with opportunities for students to investigate specific issues in their written work. Readings will draw primarily on contemporary authors with some readings from historical sources. Previous knowledge of Orthodox theology will be helpful, but not required.

INTRO TO BIOMEDICAL ETHICS (CERS-2507)

Credits:3

An introduction to major methodological and practical questions in biomedical ethics. In this course, we'll consider topics including methodologies, beginning of life issues, (e.g., reproductive technologies, stem cell research,) conscience conflicts in medical issues, end of life issues, (e.g., assisted suicide and euthanasia,) justice in public policies concerning medicine and research, research ethics, and issues of pastoral care in the hospital setting. Topics may change if students wish to pursue a particular interest. Grades will be based on class participation, weekly reflection papers, and a final project. [Previous course in moral theology/Christian ethics at graduate level; Faculty Consent required]

ETHICS IN FILM (CERS-2540)

Credits:3

The relationship between theology and film is an interfaith dialogue. Accordingly, film is able to help us think more imaginatively about the meaning, value and attitude of Christian life. This is a seminar style course which focuses on theological and socio-ethical reflection on films. It is not about film theories or filmography. The participants in the class are expected to view some films for learning, inquiring, writing, and sharing themes and issues. And after viewing a film, each student is asked to write a review/reflection paper.

DISMANTLING GENDER (CERS-4021)

Credits:3

This course will examine gender as we move our understanding from a binary to a broader and more fluid spectrum. This topic becomes more complex when we talk about transgender and genderqueer people. Through various readings and videos, group discussions, active listening, and writing we will look at the gender binary as it informs gender roles especially in regards to power and privilege in sex, marriage, the workplace, family, race, religion, etc. Through the work we will take personal inventory of what we know and what we do not know about gender and how it is changing. We will discover how those changes affect us, how we see the world and how we feel about them. Students will work with a study partner (chevruta) throughout the course. There will be weekly postings on the readings and weekly blogging. Each chevruta group will be required to work on a class presentation. There will also be a final reflection paper due to discuss what each student has learned through the semester. [PIN code required; 24 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

BEYONCE & AFRICAN SPIRIT JUST (CERS-4022)

Credits:3

The official title of this class is ^Unravelling the Black Girl Magic in Lemonade: An Introduction to African Spirit Religions, Black Spirit Themes and the Spiritual Social Justice Messages in Beyonce's Visual Album.^ In the context of this course, ^Black Girl Magic^ will represent many of the metaphoric ways that black women are ^magical.^ However, the emphasis on ^magic^ here is related to the African Spirit Religions and Black Spirit themes represented throughout Beyonce's visual album ^Lemonade.^ Students will be asked to engage various sources of learning that will provide an intro level knowledge of African Spirit religions, African Spirit Deities and Black Spirit themes and to consider the ways that these religions have been or could be strategic and intentional conduits for the black woman's reality of self-healing, self-actualizing, radical self-love in an Anti-Black oppressive system, and for manifesting veritable social justice realities within her community, historically and in the future. This is a 3 unit Hybrid/Residential class. [Faculty consent required; 25 max enrollment]

DEATH & JUSTICE: A CASE STUDY (CERS-4468)

Credits:3

This August intensive is an advanced counter oppression course focusing on the book Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital by Sheri Fink. The premise of the course is that you are a religious leader - perhaps a CPE student working in Memorial Hospital or a parish minister in the hospital for another reason. You are trapped in the hospital in New Orleans by rising water. How do you understand race, class and ageism as they play out in this setting? What tools would you have to address the situation intersectionally and perhaps even prevent the euthanasia that happened? We will address this case study through readings on racial justice; prayer and meditation are some of your tools. Students must read the book and submit summaries 7 days prior to the class. Required reading includes Ta-Nehisi Coats Between the World and Me, a book on prayer chosen by the student and other articles to be assigned. The class will involve analysis of the hospital system, case study role playing, presentations by experts and much extemporaneous prayer. This will be an intense and experiential learning experience. Pre-requisites: ECO or instructor permission are pre-requisites. It is particularly important that students come to class prepared. [Faculty Consent required; 12 max enrollment; Auditors excluded] Class meets daily, 8/14/17-8/18/17, from 9:00am-5:00pm at SKSM.

PRISONS AND PUNISHMENT (CERS-4472)

Credits:1.5

A comprehensive look at the criminal justice system, its history, trends, and current practices. How do we, as people of faith, minister to victims, offenders, and family members of those caught up in the system? There is a tendency, in public discourse to address criminal justice in a vacuum, whereas in this class the context for our work will be social, racial, and economic justice. Issues about prison chaplaincy, including the ethical questions embedded in that ministry, will be discussed. We will explore new paradigms of justice, including restorative/transformative models and examine what prophetic witness calls us to. [20 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

RACE ETHICS & INTERSCT LBRTNS (CERS-4800)

Credits:3

RACE-Y ETHICS AND INTERSECTING LIBERATIONS This course examines the role of race in the struggle for collective liberation. In a world that enfleshes the logic of dominance in living out social practices (ethics), we must find ways to dismantle the logic of white supremacy, acknowledge the matrices of oppressions, and lose our chains. This course will build the case to decenter the logic of whiteness in favor of an intersectional ethics whose telos is collective liberation. By addressing the various contours of dis/ability, race, sex, sexuality, Trans*, queerness, contemporary social movements, and the production of a logic of dominance through the representationalism of American politics, this course constructs the demand for an intersectional ethics. By acknowledging the matrices of oppression AND the need for an intersectional ethics, this course strategically dismantles the logic of dominance that is privileged in the proliferation of white supremacy and re-imagines our moral imagination as one that is constructed from the place of radical interconnectedness and the web of becoming different in the world. By acknowledging that our liberation is bound up with one another, we will come to recognize that the matrices of oppression must be met with an intersectional approach of not only dismantling the dominance that frames our lives but the constructive move of re-imagining theology and ethics for collective liberation. We will explore these various themes through political philosophy, poetry, queer theory, disability studies, and our own personal narratives. This course is also a course that will explicitly address liberationist themes for both theology and ethics. We will all seek to develop a shared language that helps reframe dominant theological themes and ethics.

ETHICS IN FILM (CERS-5040)

Credits:3

The relationship between theology and film is an interfaith dialogue. Accordingly, film is able to help us think more imaginatively about the meaning, value and attitude of Christian life. This is a seminar style course which focuses on theological and socio-ethical reflection on films. It is not about film theories or filmography. The participants in the class are expected to view some films for learning, inquiring, writing, and sharing themes and issues. And after viewing a film, each student is asked to write a review/reflection papers.

FUNDAMENTAL MORAL THEOLOGY (CEST-1314)

Credits:3

An introduction to the key concepts and questions regarding how one lives in response to the gospel of Jesus Christ. The course draws on Scripture and Catholic Tradition, emphasizes the integration of dogmatic, moral, and spiritual theology, and follows Aquinas' emphasis on the virtues. The subject is approached systematically, attending to salient notions such as beatitude, conversion, absolute moral norms, passions, the natural law, and conscience. Evaluation will be by means of in-class participation, short papers, and by a midterm and/or final examination. [Auditors with Faculty permission]

WOMANISM AND EARTH JUSTICE (CEST-4554)

Credits:3

The ground of ecowomanist ethics is watered by multigenerational responses to racial and gender stereotypes in relation to communal knowledge of the land. This wisdom survived through centuries of violence and the daily lived experience of bigotry and abuse in a white supremacist world, and rests on pluralistic understandings of the sacred relationship between human and non-human nature. It remains today as part of the womanist call to accountability and spirit defined in Alice Walker's writings. This course will explore the emergent field of ecowomanist ethics in a global context through a wide variety of voices including those of activists, scholars, and grassroots organizers. What do the lived experiences of women in the African Diaspora have to teach us about earth justice and environmental degradation? What moral guidance can we learn from those perspectives? And how might we integrate such wisdom into the wider environmental canon? This is a HYBRID course. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

LIBERATING ETHICAL IMAGINATION (CEST-4559)

Credits:3

Our ethical imagination can help us to challenge oppressive systems, to bear witness to the voices of the forgotten, and to imagine, create and sustain alternative, liberating ways of being. This foundational course will start with an introduction to ethics and then explore the role of traditionally underrepresented voices in the academy in shaping our ethical imagination and in promoting individual and collective practices of justice. It will also encourage interdisciplinary work among theo/alogies, ethics, the arts and popular culture, as works of art will also be considered as sources for the ethical imagination. Readings will include works by selected liberation, feminist, womanist, mujerista and queer theo/alogians, as well as by ethicists and philosophers. Movies and visits by guest theologians, artists and activists will also enrich our perspective. [25 max enrollment; PIN code required; Auditors excluded]