Course Information

 

for Formative Theology Department


READING THEOLOGICAL GERMAN (FT-0006)

Credits:0

^Im Anfang war das Wort . . .^ (Johannes 1:1) This course teaches German to facilitate reading and research at a graduate level. The instructor focuses on grammar and vocabulary, with particular attention to specialized theological/exegetical language. A good deal of time will be spent on translation and comprehension of previous GTU German exams, and on developing effective strategies for covering a good deal of material in a minimum of time. The course is excellent preparation for the GTU Modern Foreign Language Exam administered by the GTU each year in September, February, and May. Successful completion of the German language proficiency exam administered at the end of the course will certify proficiency in German in the GTU Common MA and Doctoral degree programs. Cost for course is $650. Class meets weekdays, 7/10/17-8/4/17, from 11:30am-2:30pm (M & W) and 9am-12noon (T, Th, F) at GTU HEDCO. [15 max enrollment] Textbooks: English Grammar for Students of German, 6/e, by Cecile Zorach and Charlotte Melin, Olivia and Hill Press. ISBN 978-0934034-43-2; $19.95; REQUIRED. Harper Collins German College Dictionary or equivalent. Price varies. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.

READING THEOLOGICAL SPANISH (FT-0007)

Credits:0

^En el principo, exista el verbo . . . ^ (Juan 1:1) This course will teach Spanish with a particular emphasis on reading and researching at the graduate level. The instructor will focus on grammar and vocabulary to strengthen the students' ability to read, understand and translate passages. Most of our time will be spent reviewing grammar, verb conjugations, idiomatic phrases as well as practicing translation and comprehension with previous GTU Spanish exams. The course is excellent preparation for the GTU Modern Foreign Language Exam administered by the GTU each year in September, February, and May. Successful completion of the Spanish language proficiency exam administered at the end the coursewill certify proficiency in Spanish for the GTU Common MA and doctoral degree programs. Cost for the course is $650. Class meets weekdays, 7/10/17-8/4/17, from 9:00am-12:00pm, at GTU Student Lounge. [Contact instructor for prerequisites; 15 max enrollment]

RSRCH&WRTING LAB IN SEM CNTXT (FT-1002)

Credits:0

Working on a paper, thesis, or class presentation? Need help with overcoming procrastination, writer's block, or writer's anxiety? The purpose of this lab is to offer a weekly block of time wherein an instructor is present to offer support for, and feedback on, student research, writing, time management, and goal setting. This communal environment provides accountability and energy to increase motivation and productivity. The instructor is available during this time-block to meet with students one-on-one in a nearby room for periods of fifteen minutes to half an hour as needed.

EXPLORATIONS IN MINISTRY (FT-1010)

Credits:1.5

Explore vocational issues in the context of historic and emerging forms of ministry in church and society.

FORMATION FOR MINISTRY GROUP (FT-1024)

Credits:0

Required for MDiv, MTS, MCM degree and CATS students. [5 max enrollment per section] SPRING 2017 All sections meet Wednesdays from 8:30am-9:30am as follows: 2/8, 2/15, 3/1, 3/15, 4/12, and 5/3. Section 01 meets in the Care Team Room Section 02 meets in Geisy 2 Section 03 meets in Sawyer Office Section 04 meets in Great Hall FALL 2017 All sections meet Wednesdays from 8:30am-9:30am as follows: 9/13, 10/4, 10/18, 11/1, 11/15, 11/29; at PLTS. SPRING 2018 All sections meet Wednesdays from 8:30am-9:30am as follows: 2/14, 2/28, 3/14, 4/4, 4/18, 5/2; at PLTS.

ADVANCED ACADEMIC ENGLISH (FT-1071)

Credits:1.5

Weekly workshop in writing essays for core MDiv courses. Pass/Fail only.

NEW MEDIA WEB RSRCES FOR WRSHP (FT-1100)

Credits:1.5

USING NEW MEDIA TECHNOLOGIES AND WEB-BASED RESOURCES IN WORSHIP This course will teach worship leaders how to capture attention and present effective worship combining new media devices such as iPods, projectors, digital cameras, and computers, with Internet resources including YouTube, iTunes, and various art, film clip, and preaching resource websites. Participants will learn about using worship-appropriate and inexpensive new media delivery systems; how to build support for the use of screens and visual arts in all varieties of congregations; how to develop team-based worship planning and leadership; where to find music, art, photography, and film resources from the Internet and elsewhere; and ways to theologically reflect about the impact and use of new media in church and global society. Class meets daily, 7/20/09- 7/24/09, from 8:30am-12:30pm, at PSR. NOTE: This course has special registration procedures and fees. See www.psr.edu/summer.

THEOLOGICAL WRITING I (FT-1109)

Credits:1.5

First semester of a required course for entering ABSW seminarians - open to other GTU students. Students will learn skills of academic writing, critical analysis, and articulation of objectives. Writing samples and instructor feedback integrate theory and praxis.

FRAMWRK CRITCL ENGAGMNT:MNSTRY (FT-1267)

Credits:3

This is an interdisciplinary course that provides framework for practical theology--understood as the integration of social analysis, theological reflection, and interpretation. Goals of the course: to practice thinking theologically, value difference and reflexivity, call forth spiritual resources and foster leadership for critical discernment with compassion and competent practice in a variety of settings and orientations; to tap the resources of human and natural systems for care and wider justice; draw-upon and effectively utilize relevant research information.

BEGINNING YOUR MINISTRY (FT-1304)

Credits:1.5

Focus on resources, skills & knowledge to prepare students (especially senior MDivs) for their first ministry placements. Topics include entry issues, transition, self-care and support systems, leadership styles, conflict management, authority of the minister, models for understanding congregational systems. Students interested in alternative ministries to parish can form their own working group during part of the class time. Course is for 8 weeks, two hour sessions, Feb. 4 - Apr. 1. Pass/Fail only.

FINANCES FOR CHURCH LEADERS (FT-1361)

Credits:1.5

This course uses video teaching, class discussions, and interactive small group activities to explore biblical, practical steps for getting rid of debt, managing money, spending and saving wisely, and unleashing the power of generous giving. Pass/Fail only. Course meets on Wednesdays, 7:10-9:40 from 9/4-11/6.

SPANISH FOR WORSHIP I (FT-1853)

Credits:3

Spanish grammar, syntax and vocabulary with the goal of equipping students to lead worship services in Spanish. (To be followed by Spanish for Worship II.) Spanish for Worship I starts with review of basic Spanish grammar as refresher of prior Spanish language study and advances from there by abstracting grammatical principles and vocabulary from liturgical, ministry, and biblical sources. Recommended: One year of college Spanish or equivalent. Beginning students are welcome if intentional in dedicating extra time and work to catch up to level of course. [Auditors excluded]

SPANISH FOR WORSHIP II (FT-1854)

Credits:3

Classroom, face-to-face course. Continuation of Spanish for Worship I. Course focuses on liturgical, ministry, biblical, and theological resources to build language proficiency and confidence in the proclamation of Word and Sacrament liturgies in Spanish-speaking or bilingual contexts. Prerequisites: Spanish for Worship I. Students not having taken Spanish for Worship I could petition professor to enroll if having taken a minimum of two years of college Spanish. [15 max enrollment]

MINISTRY ACROSS CULTURES (FT-2204)

Credits:3

In this course the student will gain increased awareness of diverse socio-cultural values and contextual theological interpretations; discuss the intersection of ethnicity/race and socioeconomic class, and its repercussions for ministry; reflect theologically on our role as church leaders in the multicultural society of the U.S.; explore ways of practicing anti-racism in our Church; discern specific issues impacting ministry with African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and Anglo Americans in the mixed multicultural ministry setting of the United States. Lecture/discussion/films/guest speakers/research presentation/exam. [Auditors with faculty permission]

READING THEOLOGICAL SPANISH (FT-2230)

Credits:4

^En el principo, exista el verbo . . . ^ (Juan 1:1) This course will teach Spanish with a particular emphasis on reading and researching at the graduate level. The instructor will focus on grammar and vocabulary to strengthen the students' ability to read, understand and translate passages. Most of our time will be spent reviewing grammar, verb conjugations, idiomatic phrases as well as practicing translation and comprehension with previous GTU Spanish exams. The course is excellent preparation for the GTU Modern Foreign Language Exam administered by the GTU each year in September, February, and May. Successful completion of the course, including a Spanish language proficiency exam administered at the end of the course, with a grade of B or better, will certify proficiency in Spanish for the GTU Common MA and doctoral degree programs. Cost for the course is $670. Class meets weekdays, 7/14/14-8/8/14, from 10:00am-1:00pm, at MUDD 101. [Contact instructor for prerequisites; 15 max enrollment]

READING THEOLOGICAL FRENCH (FT-2250)

Credits:4

^Au commencement etait le Verbe . . . ^ (Jean 1:1). The focus of this course is to enable theological reading and research in French. The course focuses on learning the language, i.e., grammar and vocabulary. The course also develops and improves comprehension, translation, and summarization skills, while engaging theological writing and the Bible, and develops French pronunciation. The course is excellent preparation for the GTU Modern Foreign Language Exam administered by the GTU each year in September, February, and May. Successful completion of the course, including a French language proficiency exam administered at the end of the course, with a B or better grade will certify proficiency in French for the GTU Common MA and Doctoral degree programs. Contact the instructor at . Cost for course is $670. Class meets weekdays, 7/21/14-8/15/14, from 9:00am-12:00pm, at CDSP A (7/21-8/13) and CDSP 113 (8/14 & 8/15). [Beginning to Intermediate French strongly desired; if you are just starting in French, please contact the instructor; PIN code required; 15 max enrollment]

FAITH & HEALING IN APPALACHIA (FT-2392)

Credits:3

A 10 day interdisciplinary class will explore the ways faith communities interact and affect the development of healthy communities. We will examine the relationship between economic realities and the health of communities as they intersect with the life and practices of church communities. Contact for required application and more information. This course meets 10 hours in the latter part of the Fall semester, as determined by the delegation for preparation. [Auditors with Faculty permission] Times and dates TBA.

RENEW:SKILLS FOR LEADING (FT-2517)

Credits:1.5

RENEW: SKILLS FOR LEADING NEW AND RENEWING PROGRESSIVE CHURCHES This course, designed and presented by the co-founders of the Center for Progressive Renewal, teaches practical skills for starting a new progressive church or leading the renewal of a church that is stagnant or in decline. It is designed around the premise that churches are rarely resurrected, but can be born again, hence the skills needed in both situations are very similar: creating compelling vision, an effective communication strategy, data management, community development, external mission, transformational worship, and more. Class meets daily, 7/29/13-8/2/13, from 1:30pm-5:30pm, at PSR.

PRACTICAL PARISH MINISTRY (FT-2532)

Credits:1.5

THE DASH BETWEEN THE NITTY AND THE GRITTY: PRACTICAL PARISH MINISTRY This course shows how to make the pastoral ministry JOB the best job in the world. It relies on an ecclesiology of parish as the hands and feet of Jesus, an incarnational hope that our worldly work can carry heavenly hopes to human being, and an eschatological witness that now is the time when we can see the realm of God, and a Eucharistic meeting of transformed people and elements into a world of plenty for all. While it is very practical, even mundane in many of its subjects, not one of these subjects lacks a sense of God. It teaches the daily life of a parish minister in such a way as to reveal the informal job descriptions inside the formal ones. It teaches how to custom design the job description in a variety of denominational, racial, cultural and class settings. For full time or part time pastors, this course will result in an extravagant and manageable job description for the pastor. The outcome of the course is to lessen the role confusion of pastoral ministry and to give the pastor a democratically won authority to do the actual work and job of ^shepherding a flock^--and to enjoy the heaven out of it. This course will be particularly useful to pastors who are overwhelmed by their jobs and are wondering if they dare continue in parish ministry. It will also be useful for seminarians who wonder if they are called to the reality of parish ministry. At the end of the course, students will be able to define parish ministry for themselves in their contexts. Class meets daily, 7/14/14-7/18/14, from 9:00am- 1:00pm, in MUDD 102. [Auditors excluded] NOTE: For registration, see www.psr.edu/summer.

CHURCH LEADERSHIP (FT-2534)

Credits:3

This course will explore theological understandings of leadership, various styles of leadership and their effectiveness in different settings, dynamics of power and appropriate professional boundaries, and the practical skills needed to run a small non-profit such as a church parish. Students will engage material on these subjects through course readings, class discussions, reflection papers, and a group project and presentation. Required for PLTS MDiv students prior to internship.

HOW TO LEAD ALMOST ANYTHING! (FT-2537)

Credits:3

How to Lead Almost Anything is a course on Effective Leadership: Honing your leadership Style and Skills to Build Consensus not Chaos. This course examines the role and function of effective leadership in faith-based contexts as well as identifying key aspects of leadership competencies crucial to developing effective relations within any organizational setting, whether pastoral or managerial roles in prison, hospitals or military chaplaincy, non-profit community service, social entrepreneurship, or parachurch organizations. In-depth discussion, self-reflection, and interaction with secular and faith-based readings help identify specifics of effective transformational leadership in varied contexts. By the end of the course, students should be able to assess church/organizational culture in any leadership setting and present a problem-solving model on a 'real-life' leadership project. Understanding power vs influence and position vs relationship will enable students to build consensus, cohesiveness, and motivate members / staff / team toward shared vision and positive outcomes. Students will self-examine own leadership style, behavior, and experiences; learn to differentiate among skill-sets; study organizational climate and life cycles; and recognize dynamic factors affecting innovative change in churches and other work settings. Students will also understand the essential role of prophetic leadership to organize and empower transformative ministry beyond the walls of the church. FT2537 is a core MACL course; MDiv and DMin students welcome (Extra assignments will be added for DMin level). [Auditors excluded]

ISSUES IN PARISH LEADERSHIP (FT-2763)

Credits:3

This course explores the nature of leadership in a congregational setting, with a focus on creating substantive and meaningful transformation in congregational systems, and in the lives of parishioners. This course also deals with the practical aspects of congregational leadership, including: parish finances and stewardship, congregational growth and development, church canons, working with vestries and church boards, clergy taxes, conflict management, and ministry development. Evaluation is based on class participation, short papers, and a final group project. Pass/Fail only. Intended audience: MDiv, CAS. [PIN code required; 20 max enrollment]

ABCD TRAINING:CMMNTY ORGNZNG (FT-2766)

Credits:1.5

This two-day training will explore the background and principles (theory) of Asset Based Community Development as taught by Ron Dwyer-Voss, a professional in this field. In the first half of the training the class will contrast the ABCD approach with traditional approaches to community development and social services, do asset mapping, and evaluate strengths, limitations and relationships between Institutions, Individuals and Associational groups. During the second half of the training the class will identify motivations to act, connect associations (and congregations) in ways that they can accomplish more together than apart, and practice mapping and engagement tools, among other things. This approach to community organizing and development is a valuable tool to ordained and lay leaders as the church plays an important role in addressing the needs of our society.Class meets F & SA, 2/1/13-2/2/13, from 9:00am-5:00pm, in PLTS GH 1.

NON-PROFIT AS PROPHET (FT-2772)

Credits:3

The course introduces the student interested in social service ministries to the world of the non-profit sector; both secular and religiously affiliated. Taught from the perspective of non-profit as the prophetic force within a market-driven capitalistic system, the class will strive to achieve three-goals: 1) to trace the historical emergence, as well as the political, social, and economic significance of the non-profit sector; 2) to identify the trends and issues critical to effective leadership and management for institutional vitality and sustainability of non-profits in the current environment; and 3) to identify and develop core strategies and skills for the process of incorporating social change models into social service work. Class meets F & SA: 9/11-12; 10/9-10; 11/13-14; 12/5, 2015. (Times: Friday evening 6:30-9pm; Saturdays 9am to 1pm) plus weekly online assignments.

HIP HOP IN MINISTRY (FT-3320)

Credits:3

Preachers who ^rap^ and ^rhyme?^ Choirs that ^krump,^ ^get stupid,^ and ^flow?^ What in the world has happened to traditional ministry, particularly with the emergence of Hip Hop Culture? This course will investigate this question, by using a postmodern sociological approach to highlight how trends, forms of expression, language and styles of Hip Hop culture have informed liturgy, rituals and the practice of ministry in African American congregations and in other racial/ethnic faith communities in the Bay Area. Students interested in the relationship between culture and religion will study 1)the socio-historical and global formation development of Hip Hop culture and art; 2)the post-colonial and economic trajectories that have led to the formation of ^poltical conscious rap^ and the ^gangsta genre;^ and 3) the theological trends that have emerged in Hip Hop, from liberation ideology to Holy Hop's praise and worship style. As a student, you will, here, be engaged in what role theological language in Hip Hop play in either creating ^radically inclusive^ ministries of hope and liberation or in maintaining forms of domination and social control through the commodification of Hip Hop artists, Holy Hop clergy/rappers in particular. In this regard, you will be encouraged through writing assignments to create your own Hip Hop art in practical/prophetic ministries of hope and liberation. In addition to class lectures, a wide variety of teaching pedagogy will be used including music of popular culture, visits to local Hip Hop and Holy Hop venues, and guest from the local Hip Hop community. What a fellowship, what a joy divine, what a dialogue between religion and culture we will have!

PARISH/NON-PROFIT ADMIN (FT-3609)

Credits:1.5

This course offers a comprehensive examination of church and pastoral administration, developing an understanding of and the practical skills for working in non-profit management. With a multi- denominational and multi-cultural perspective, the issues covered will include mission, finances, facilities, communication, personnel, leadership skills and organizational management. Course format is lecture/discussion/exercises. Method of evaluation is attendance/participation/final paper-project determined by each student's future ministry.

EFFECTIVE CHANGE IN ORGS (FT-4082)

Credits:1.5

Innovating is at the core of successful enterprises today whether in congregations, or start-ups, or nonprofit agencies. It requires diligence, discipline and the credible projections of future trends and competitive forces. It requires imagination, focus and human resources. It also requires shared tools, practices and habits of mind. This course will introduce students to the tools and practices of innovation, deep congregational insight, and design thinking in churches. This is a learn-by-doing lab. Students will work collaboratively to understand and then solve challenges of today's congregational systems. The goal of this course is to equip students with skills and practices that drive administration and management in pastoral organizations, business and social innovation. These practices enable one to meaningfully contribute to congregation-centered problem solving; they emphasize empathy, flattened hierarchies and networked decision making with large and small churches. Students will be introduced to research methods, ethnographic interviewing/observation, analysis and synthesis, reflective thinking, persona and scenario creation, ideation processes, rapid prototyping, collaboration, concept testing, iterative design and narrative communication. Course meets daily 6/26/17-6/30/17, from 8:30am-12:30pm at MUDD 103. [40 max enrollment]

PUBLIC MINISTRY (FT-4670)

Credits:3

Public Ministry will explore opportunities for ministry beyond the walls of the church, building into the community and world by delving in theology for Public Church and the ministries of community organizing, advocacy, and direct services. Students will take substantial responsibility for their integrative reflection, research, and sharing of their learning with their peers. Discussion/seminar/reading/research/ presentations/term paper. [Auditors excluded]

READING CONGREGATIONS (FT-8227)

Credits:1.5

This online course assists M.Div students in establishing and integrating observational skills and tools of critical theological reflection for the purpose of discerning the socio/political, historical, liturgical, and theological ^cultures^ of selected congregations. We observe and analyze a variety of congregations at Sunday worship in order to identify the particular cultural and contextual dynamics operative within these congregations. We identify and reflect upon how worship space is organized and utilized in these communities; how the worshiping community integrates itself into the contexts in which it is located what worship means to both clergy and lay members in these communities; and how worship embodies and expresses a particular community's understanding of who God is and how God works in the world. Central to the course are the development of effective observational and reflective skills; preparation of written summaries of site observations; and identifying needs and goals for each student's future teaching parish site [Lutherans only] in consultation with the PLTS Office of Contextual Education. Graded coursework consists of written reflections and a final oral exam.

DISCIPLES HISTORY AND POLITY (FT-8240)

Credits:3

Utilizing historical, theological and cultural methods and approaches, this class will survey and examine the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), from its founding two centuries ago to its contemporary expressions. The course will explore the present design and functioning (polity) of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in its congregational, regional, and general manifestations. We will analyze the theological roots and developments of the Disciples tradition, and discuss the directions of mission, ministry, and ecumenism within the contemporary witness and work of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). This course fulfills the denominational requirement in Disciples history and polity for ordination. The course is designed for M.Div. students seeking ordination, but others may enroll. The course will operate online with about 15 hours of in-person meetings (contact instructor for information).

ORGANIZATNL SYSTEMS THINKING (FT-8404)

Credits:3

This course is designed to promote understanding among religious leaders of how organizations operate on the systems level. ^Systems thinking^ is a methodology linking understandings of how individuals, small and large groups of people interact with the structure, policies, practices, and culture of an organization. Participants will read materials on various aspects of organizational life, examine the ways in which components interact, discuss emotional and family systems theories and their implications for congregational systems, use systems analysis and thinking to investigate congregational leadership, analyze case studies for evidence of organizational frames, and prepare a case study demonstrating systems thinking. References and examples of working to counter oppressions are foundational to this course. [22 max enrollment; PIN code required; Auditors excluded]

PRISON MINISTRY (FTCE-2572)

Credits:3

The United States has the highest rate of incarceration of all institutionalized democracies. Currently 1 out of every 100 adult Americans is behind bars. Prisoners are among the poorest and most disenfranchised members of society. Communities of color are over-represented in the American prison system. There is a critical shortage of professionally trained jail and prison chaplains. This course offers both a theoretical and experiential introduction to prison ministry with an emphasis on the unique theological, psychological and ministerial needs of the incarcerated. The course will focus on practical tools needed for successful prison ministry. Students will be introduced to the pastoral challenges of work in prison and be required to spend 2 hours per week on-site engaged in prison ministry under the supervision of an experienced chaplain, preferably at San Quentin State Prison where many opportunities for students to participate in programs are available. Class time will include lecture, active discussion of readings, role-playing, and theological reflection.

RECLAIMING NEIGHBORHOODS (FTCE-2950)

Credits:3

This course will give the urban Minister or Pastor specific tools in addressing the challenges facing black and brown communities. Some of the issues covered in this course will include: drugs in black and brown communities, drug and gang violence, trauma as a result of violence, mentoring as a way of reaching our youth, and community organizing as a way of making effective change. Course requirements: Oral reports and one final paper (8-10 pages) on how you might apply what you have learned. Also, three hours of community involvement. Last time the class was taught, we did a night walk, but you may choose another community service. SUMMER 2017 Class meets weekdays, 6/12/17-6/23/17, from 6:10pm-9:40pm.

SHOW ME THE MONEY (FTCE-3040)

Credits:3

Show Me the Money: Contemporary approaches to fund raising & stewardship in religious and non-profit organizations. After establishing the theological perspective m money and giving, class participants will examine the major approaches to and tools for fund-raising, as well as the centrality of giving for the sustainability of churches and other non-profit settings. This course is suited for those preparing for ministry as well as those engaged in non-profit or helping ministries.

PRAC THEOL: PRXS IN BLM TIMES (FTCE-4050)

Credits:3

In an unsettling landscape of post-2016 election, it is pertinent to examine praxis in the interdisciplinary rubrics of practical theology. Present dilemmas of theological and ethical debates about roles of churches in public square discourse about intersecting disparities are not new, resurfacing in milestone eras of human rights crisis. Students will investigate forms of practical theology that critically engages theoethics as we think about implications of civic realities and lived experiences. In seminar format, students will consider the present societal stew of what I call Black Lives Matter Times to examine public ideological clashes over moral imperatives and identities that pose a conundrum of expectations on what is appropriate theoethical action from diverse faith and inter-religious communities, i.e., what are the theoethical links to social reform activism as discipleship ministry. Class will meet 9:30am-4:30pm on 5 Saturdays in Spring 2018: 2/10; 3/3; 4/7; 4/28; 5/12

LEADERSHIP,MINISTRY,THE YOUNG (FTED-2620)

Credits:3

Leadership is said to be in crisis in our world, especially in religious organizations today. This course examines present day issues affecting the role of leaders of apostolic religious communities. Participants will be asked to reflect and begin to articulate a new style of collaborative leadership for today using theories from the new science. Finally the course will seek to propose a model of leadership and ways of empowering the young to begin to shape an effective leadership style for our contemporary world and ministry within it. Format: Lecture/discussion/group work; weekly reflection papers; class presentation.

WEDDINGS, BAPTISMS, FUNERALS (FTHM-2012)

Credits:3

What are the theologies and understandings related to these ritual occasions, and others, in your own denomination and tradition? What are the special issues related to pastoral care that arise? How does preaching on these special occasions differ from preaching during weekly worship? What new kinds of ritual are being created to mark important events and transitions in people's lives? How are ritual occasions changing in character and purpose? Through research in your own denomination or tradition's books of worship or through interviews with clergy if worship instructions and guidelines are not available, the student will come to understand the importance of these occasions in the life of the church and in the lives of individuals. By comparing and contrasting findings with others from varying traditions, students will come to understand their own tradition's uniqueness. Students will prepare homilies for these occasions which will be evaluated by classmates and professor.

POLITY INTENSIVE AT UU GA (FTHS-4077)

Credits:1.5

This Polity Immersion Class will run at the site of the Unitarian Universalist Association's General Assembly (June 21-25, 2017 in Columbus, OH). Participants will attend plenary sessions, mini-assemblies and worship services (on one's own or with classmates) as well as share classroom time to explore how changing cultures and theologies of leadership, authority and church shape our institutions; how polity helps or hinders our commitment to social justice; what the historical roots are for many of our traditions; and how to bring back the insights and learning from the class to home congregations and communities. The setting at General Assembly will allow all involved to move beyond past history towards an understanding of what it takes to be an effective and responsible political actor in contemporary UU settings. Students will be responsible for their own travel, lodging, and GA Registration. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

UU HISTORY, BOSTON IMMERSION (FTHS-4078)

Credits:1.5

The Boston immersion courses will include the traditional content of UU history classes in a dynamic setting. We will explore the Unitarian engagement with the Civil War alongside a trip to the Shaw memorial on Boston Common; discuss Emerson's Divinity School Address from the very hall in which it was delivered. We will grapple with the profound issues of the Black Empowerment movement from the floor of the Arlington Street Church, where the delegates disappointed by the actions of that General Assembly gathered. Our ambivalence regarding formal association will be discussed from within the offices of the UUA itself and with UUA officials; as we learn of our complicated relationship to class, we will explore the Beacon Hill neighborhood. We can accompany our discussion of the reinvention of 20th century Universalism with a trip to the Charles Street Meeting House. Touring the Athenaeum, we both encounter and discuss the Unitarian transformation of 19th century literature. Students will be given the opportunity, if desired, to room at Pickett & Eliot House, the bed and breakfast facility of the UUA. Intensive, Oct., 25-28, 2013. [15 max enrollment; PIN code required; auditors excluded]

HOW PEOPLE PRAY (FTLS-4239)

Credits:3

Prayer has an impact on people's actions across time and place. People have and do pray in many and varied ways. This course addresses the question ^What does prayer mean?^ as a tool in the work of countering oppressions. HOW PEOPLE PRAY takes prayer and praying seriously as a skill that contributes to transformative religious leadership. Prayer will be considered from a variety of faith perspectives while also exploring the art and practice of prayer as individuals within particular communities. While learning about prayer, participants will also experience prayer as an embodied social justice practice. This is an experiential and participatory course. Foundational study of texts from Jewish, Islamic, Buddhist and Christian prayer supports the learning. Prayer in other faith traditions will also be encountered. The course structure is grounded in the notion that participants learn in community emphasizing respectful interreligious dialogue. [18 max enrollment; Auditors excluded] NOTE: This course is being co-taught by a Starr King Teaching Fellow.

LOCAL ARTS IMMERSION (FTRA-3781)

Credits:3

This contextual immersion course explores intersections between different forms of spirituality and the arts, and the kinds of social transformation engendered by various artistic practices. We will visit various bay area museums, galleries, artists' residencies, pop-up art and performance spaces, and houses of workshop (synagogues, churches, mosques), to experience how the arts have incubated both transcendence and social change. The course is integrated with Pacific School of Religion's 2015 three day Earl Lecture Series, Be Arts Now!, and course participants will be expected to participate and collaborate with various Earl Lecture Events at the end of January. Though portions of the course are invested in contemporary art's engagement with different strands of social justice (land art and environmentalism; art-as-social-practice and the slow-food movement, for example), we will also explore San Francisco's rich heritage of historic faith communities and sacred spaces that have long sustained the arts. Class meets daily, 1/19/15-1/31/15, from 9:00am-5:00pm at PSR. [PIN code required]

CULTURES MEMORY IMMERSION NYC (FTRA-3785)

Credits:3

This two week immersion trip explores the intersection between art, spirituality, and social justice. With the streets, museums, and galleries of New York City as our laboratory, we will explore how various religious and ethnic communities have deployed artistic creativity as a catalyst for social change. Students must attend two long preparatory sessions in the fall 2014 semester in advance of the trip (dates in November t.b.d.) that will provide a theoretical framework for approaching the arts through the lens of spiritually-grounded social justice. There will be required reading, student-lead discussions, and blogging before and during the immersion. Students will also prepare site-specific presentations related to particular themes, and amplify how various artworks/locations provide opportunity for deeper theological reflection. Dates TBA. [PIN code required; Interview required; Auditors excluded]

FINDING YOUR PROPHETIC VOICE (FTRS-0001)

Credits:0

Is the vocation of a prophet reserved for a small number of high-profile individuals or are all Christians called to speak prophetically? What does it mean to engage in a prophet's work in today's public square, especially in an increasingly diverse and religiously pluralistic society? What kinds of resources, skills, gifts, and discernment are needed for finding one's own prophetic voice? This course will offer a biblical and theological foundation for responding to the risky and urgently needed prophetic vocation to meet today's social, cultural, political, and economic challenges. This course will also seek to empower participants to find and use their own prophetic voice in relation to the topics about which they care most passionately. Rather than trying to speak prophetically about all possible areas of concern, a key aspect of prophetic ministry is networking with others who are working on difference but related concerns. Those who are ordained to Christian ministry will also consider how to organize their faith communities to accomplish real social change in the world. Students will develop spiritual practices for remaining grounded in this work, which we will practice together each day in class. The week will be framed by a broader consideration of the role of religious faith in public life. Course meets daily, 7/15/13-7/19/13, from 9:00am-1:00pm at PSR.

ENGAGING COMMUN OF LIBERATION (FTRS-0007)

Credits:0

This immersion course in Cuernavaca, Mexico, will explore communities of liberation in modern Mexico, focusing on the LGBTQ and women's communities and on issues of economic justice within Mexico and between Mexico and the United States. Students will develop their knowledge of written, spoken and read Spanish through language classes and immersive living experience with native Spanish speakers. The program will include multiple field trips to sites of cultural and artistic importance, lectures on related topics, and dialogue with community members. Some knowledge of Spanish is suggested but not required. Course meets daily, 1/7/17-1/21/17. To receive 3.0 credits, participation in the Immersion is required followed by two hours of class time per month and 18 hours per month of reading, research, and writing of the final project during Spring 2017 semester. [Faculty Consent required]

RELIGIOUS AUTOBIGRAPHY (FTRS-1390)

Credits:3

This course is an examination of the purpose and meaning of religion within society and one's life. Through film, autobiographical narratives and academic texts, this course will further examine the life and work of various religious thinkers such as Georgia Harkness, Mahatma Gandhi, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Martin Luther King, Troy Perrt, Oscar Romero and Jarena Lee and demonstrate how ^religion^ and ^religious leaders^ can foster hope and freedom as well as pain and suffering in the world. What do these leaders have to say about faith in the social sphere? How can their theology and worldview assist 21st century citizens in effecting positive religious and social change? These narratives and writings will also provide the context for discussion concerning different perspectives of divine will and liberation, existentialism, theodicy, ^call,^ discernment, and the theory and practice of Christian ministry.

OUR WHOLE LIVES (OWL) (FTRS-1393)

Credits:1.5

Description forthcoming. Class meets daily, 8/1/2016-8/5/2016, in MUDD 206. Time TBA.

ISSUES IN MINISTRY (FTRS-2283)

Credits:3

This course will examine selected ministry issues in a variety of contexts from an Anglican perspective, through readings, lectures, class discussion, and guest speakers. Evaluation: Short reflection paper and a written project. Audience: final-year CDSP MDiv students. [PIN code required; Auditors with faculty permission] NOTE: Open only to CDSP students in the last semester. Pass/Fail only.

IMMERSION ISRAEL/PALESTINE (FTRS-2333)

Credits:3

Course coordinated in partnership with UCC Global Ministries and will be taught by Dr. Lii-Jan Lin and Rev. Dr. Peter Makari, Global Ministries Area Executive for the Middle East and Europe. This course will examine the historical and biblical context and perspective for the complex relationship between these areas of the Middle East. It will also engage with Global Ministries Ecumenical Accompaniment Programme in Palestine and Israel, to accompany Palestinians and Israelis in their non-violent efforts to advocate for justice and peace and engage in interfaith dialogue. Participants will spend time in Israel, Palestine, Jordan and other locations. Course meets 1/11/16-1/23/16 and will include 2-3 pre-immersion class sessions, dates and times in November and December 2015 TBD. [Interview required; Faculty Consent required; Auditors with faculty permission]

TAIWAN IMMERSION (FTRS-2431)

Credits:3

Taiwan is an island located off the southeastern coast of mainland China. It comprises most of the territory of the Republic of China. Through engagement with Yu Shan theological school, faith leaders and communities, aboriginal people and non-profit and government agencies, this two- week travel seminar seeks to introduce issues in ways that will help students develop theological depth, critical ethical analysis and historical insight as well as skills and relationships for leadership and working in partnership for justice. Contact for required application and more information. The class will meet approximately three times for pre-travel study; pre-travel class dates TBA. Travel dates: 1/8/12-1/22/12. [Auditors with Faculty permission]

REFUGE IN THE CITY (FTRS-2450)

Credits:3

This two-week intensive course will immerse students in hands-on learning in ministries with the most marginalized people in the inner city: ministries with people who are homeless, in recovery from substance abuse, and living with HIV/AIDS. We will also visit hospital and juvenile hall chaplaincy programs and feeding programs. Students will learn about the City of Refuge theology and model for ministry development and will reflect on praxis each day. Class generally meets three days at PSR, but may meet off-site at various Bay Area cities at various times for the remainder of the course. Students should expect to attend class for mornings, afternoons, and sometimes evenings in approximately four hour blocks, including the Saturday in between the two weeks of class. Students should also expect to arrange transportation means to travel to off- campus sites. Most sites are accessible by BART or car-pools. Class meets weekdays, 1/2/18-1/12/18, from 9:00am-1:00pm at MUDD 204.

CHANGEMAKER FELLOWS SEMINAR (FTRS-2974)

Credits:3

Enrollment in the Changemaker Fellows (CMF) Seminar is required for and limited to PSR students who have been accepted into the year-long Changemaker Fellowship program. The seminar consists of two sequential 3.0 credit classes offered in the fall and spring semesters respectively. The purpose of this seminar style course is to assist Changemaker Fellows to critically reflect on the link between spirituality and social change and to better integrate their academic and other learning experiences with their self-understanding of themselves their vocation and roles as spiritually-grounded, theologically-rooted changemakers and social justice leaders. Course activities include participation in monthly cohort meetings, attending the Rockwood Art of Leadership, taking part in a day-long spiritual retreat, and traveling as a group on a nine-day immersive learning journey. Spring 2015: Day and time TBA Fall 2015: Sep. 9, Oct. 7, Nov. 4, Dec. 2 Spring 2016: Feb. 3, Mar. 2, Apr. 20, May 18. [Faculty Consent required; 15 max enrollment]

FAITH & PUBLIC POLICY: WDC (FTRS-2975)

Credits:1.5

This intensive in Washington, D.C. will engage students with government leaders, media, religious leaders, organizers, nonprofit advocacy, and justice organizations and movements. Students will also engage in direct advocacy on Capitol Hill. Students admitted to this course in early registration will help identify policy foci of the course. Immersion time in WDC: 5/22/17-6/1/17. Course requires attendance at 2 pre-trip classes in Spring semester. Class dates are: Wednesday, 3/15/17, 2017 4:00-5:30 pm, Wednesday, 4/26/17, 2017 4:00-6:30 pm. Application required - see https://psr.edu/academics/contextual-learning/ for application and due dates. Limited number of participants, open to community members/auditors. [Faculty Consent required]

FINDING YOUR PROPHETIC VOICE (FTRS-3500)

Credits:1.5

Is the vocation of a prophet reserved for a small number of high-profile individuals or are all Christians called to speak prophetically? What does it mean to engage in a prophet's work in today's public square, especially in an increasingly diverse and religiously pluralistic society? What kinds of resources, skills, gifts, and discernment are needed for finding one's own prophetic voice? This course will offer a biblical and theological foundation for responding to the risky and urgently needed prophetic vocation to meet today's social, cultural, political, and economic challenges. This course will also seek to empower participants to find and use their own prophetic voice in relation to the topics about which they care most passionately. Rather than trying to speak prophetically about all possible areas of concern, a key aspect of prophetic ministry is networking with others who are working on difference but related concerns. Those who are ordained to Christian ministry will also consider how to organize their faith communities to accomplish real social change in the world. Students will develop spiritual practices for remaining grounded in this work, which we will practice together each day in class. The week will be framed by a broader consideration of the role of religious faith in public life. Course meets daily, 7/15/13-7/19/13, from 9:00am-1:00pm at PSR.

US MEXICO BORDER IMMERSION (FTRS-3835)

Credits:1.5

This course examines the experience of the U.S./Mexico (San Ysidro/Tijuana) border through interaction and engagement with border agents, activists, religious leaders, communities, maquiladora workers, service providers, politicians, social psychologists, economists, and artists at the border. Students will be asked to examine how border issues directly impact and are affected by their own spiritual leadership and to explore the implications of this immersive learning on their own religious practices and theologies. Application required - see https://psr.edu/academics/contextual-learning/ for application and due dates. Faculty may request interview. Limited number of participants, open to community members/auditors. There will be 2-3 required pre-trip classroom sessions during Spring 2018 semester for both academic discussion & logistics. Dates of Spring 2018 courses TBD. [Faculty Consent required]

RELIGIOUS AUTOBIOGRAPHY (FTRS-4390)

Credits:3

RELIGIOUS AUTOBIOGRAPHY: FAITH & FILM This course is an examination of the purpose and meaning of religion within society and one's life. Through film, autobiographical narratives and academic texts, this course will further examine the life and work of various religious thinkers and demonstrate how "religion" and "religious leaders" can foster hope and freedom as well as pain and suffering in the world. What do these leaders have to say about faith in the social sphere? How can their theology and worldview assist 21st century citizens in effecting positive religious and social change? These narratives and writings will also provide the context for discussion concerning different perspectives of divine will and liberation. The way in which religion functions as a source of liberation and oppression will be explored through the reflections and personal stories of students in this seminar. In this respect, the seminar will assist students in their own exploration of existentialism, theodicy, call, discernment, seminary life, and the theory and practice of Christian ministry.

COMMUNITY ORGANIZING I (FTRS-4500)

Credits:1.5

Community Organizing: Session I Faith and Community Organizing: Prophets, Power, and Social Transformation. Now more than ever, we need creative, determined and spiritually- and morally--rooted organizers to aid in the work of building strong, resilient and responsive communities. These uncertain times demand a new generation of community leaders – religious and not – who are morally grounded, relationship focused, and skillful at building and using community power. From these strong foundations, individuals become more able to carry out the work of social movements – the large waves of change that mark this time as a moment for resistance. In this class, we will examine and try out several different models of organizing, explore our own personal paths to and styles of leadership, look at the unique and urgent work facing today's prophetic leaders, and uncover ways to build and re-build community life (based in spiritual teaching and practice) that lead to needed social change. Throughout this class, we will delve into some traditional as well as some new ways of thinking about community organizing in and outside of faith contexts. We will also take a look at the difference between community organizing and social movements, and understand how congregations and other community institutions can be anchors in helping individuals make meaning in the rapidly-changing, politically-charged moment in which we live. Each interactive session will combine discussion of organizing theory and impact with practical skill-building. Students will be challenged to read, reflect, write, and put teachings into action in mini-organizing campaigns. This course is designed for students, former students, and community partners who are serious about integrating social justice into their leadership, who want to learn how to use organizing as a congregational or community development tool, and/or who want to better understand the role that faith communities can (and need to) play in movements for social change. Course meets weekdays, 6/04/18 - 6/08/18, from 9am-1pm.

ENTREPRENEURIAL MINISTRIES (FTRS-8195)

Credits:1.5

This introductory course covers the nuts and bolts of creating and sustaining non-profit organizations and ministries. We'll cover such topics as personnel, funding, office management, interfacing with the larger institutional church as well as secular organizations, strategic planning, publicity, and media relations. This ONLINE course meets asynchronously using Moodle. It has no required meeting times. High-speed internet connection required. See http://moodle.gtu.edu/mod/page/view.php?id=22717 for full technology requirements.

TRANSFORMATIVE LEADERSHIP (FTRS-8297)

Credits:3

PROPHET, HERETIC, AND SOCIAL ENTREPRENEUR Social entrepreneurship is a rapidly developing and changing field, which in many ways both builds upon and poses crucial challenges to older styles and strategies of religious and spiritual leadership. This course is designed to provide participants with a basic overview of theories and practices of social entrepreneurship as well the opportunity to critically reflect on the benefits and limitations of this particular model of leadership in working towards for the common good. A central question to be explored throughout the course will be: What can spiritual/religious/theological values can contribute to the practice of social entrepreneurship and the quest for a more just,inclusive, and equitable world. This course will be taught in a seminar format, which means that class participants will be expected to take increased responsibility for preparing for class discussions, co-designing the course experience, and leading class activities. Additionally, engagement with external experts will be a major component of this course. Class participants will be exposed to these external experts in the classroom through guest-lectures, viewing online videos, and completing assigned readings. Outside of the classroom, students will be expected to identify and conduct a one-on-one interview with a social entrepreneur of their choosing, who may continue to serve as a mentor after the course has ended. This course is required for all those enrolled in PSR's Certificate of Spirituality and Social Change. This ONLINE course meets asynchronously using Moodle (http://gtu.edu/library/students/moodle-help). High-speed internet connection required. (Occasional synchronous class meetings may be scheduled; see syllabus for details.)

DEEPENING THE WELL (FTSP-5050)

Credits:3

This course will invite students to explore the nature of their own spiritual formation and to cultivate an awareness of the Divine presence and action in every dimension of life. Through readings from multiple faith traditions, audio and film resources, discussion, reflection, and a variety of experiential activities we will consider the practices, struggles, and commitments that deepen and nourish our souls. We will look at the role of spirituality in ministry, and the impacts that the demands of ministry can have on our spirituality. We will examine the importance of developing an ongoing spiritual discipline to foster balance, integrity and vitality in our relationships with God, self, family, congregation, community, and world. High residential only, not hybrid. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment]