Course Information

 

for Historical and Cultural Studies of Rels Department


HSTRY OF XTNTY IN PACIFIC REGN (HS-0003)

Credits:0

HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY IN THE PACIFIC REGION Anyone doing ministry in the Pacific Northwest, California, or Hawaii will have noticed that the usual historical narratives that have helped mainline, ecumenical, and progressive Christians define their identity do not seem as relevant in the Pacific world where so many do not share the cultural and historical experience from which they derive. In this class we will take a different look at the history of Christianity in the Pacific world and work with students to build historical narratives that will inspire and undergird the work of strengthening and re-shaping Christian communities for the future. Class meets weekdays 7/22/13-8/9/13, from 9:00am-1:00pm, at PSR.

INTRO TO CHRISTIAN HISTORY (HS-1040)

Credits:3

This course covers the History of Christianity from Late Antiquity to the present, taking a global perspective. It focuses on Christianity as culture rather than the church as institution. We will discuss, however, the institutional forms of Christianity as they develop over time. The course also serves to introduce basic theological concepts in contexts where significant developments and variations in Christian theology took place. This course prepares students for basic courses in theology, and for further studies in History of Christianity. The course design also takes into consideration that there may be a significant number of students who are not Christian. The lectures and reading plans are structured to show how the History of Christianity is relevant for both Christian and non-Christian students. Class meets weekdays, 7/5/11-7/22/11, from 1:30pm-5:30pm, in MUDD 103. NOTE: For registration, see www.psr.edu/summer.

HISTORY OF THE CHURCH (HS-1070)

Credits:3

This introductory survey of church history will offer an overview of the main developments of the Church up to the present while developing important analytic skills relevant for those pursuing careers in ministry. Special attention will be given to the cooperation of clergy and laity; development of devotional practice; and significant theological developments through church history. Evaluation will be based on student participation; reflection papers or short essays; and a research project.

HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY I (HS-1102)

Credits:3

This course will trace the history of Christian communities from their inception through the late medieval period. Emphasis on close reading of primary texts and issues of power, authority, the nature of discipleship, and the social and political contexts of Christian witness. Lecture/discussion; four 3-5 page papers and either a written take-home or oral final exam. Required for PLTS MTS and MCM students not taking HS 1112 or HS 2012.

HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY II (HS-1109)

Credits:3

A survey of the life and thought of Christianity from the Reformation to the present as it unfolded in various economic, political and social contexts. An important component of the course will be critical reflection on primary sources in relation to issues faced in the church today.

HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY (HS-1120)

Credits:3

This is a basic History of Christianity Course, taught face-to-face in the classroom. It combines reading, discussion, lecture, and a research project in the exploration of the history of Christianity from a multi-cultural/multi-denomination perspective. Students can use the course to explore their own denominational history or other aspects of the History of Christianity as they choose. Students will leave with basic skills in historical research and the interpretation of historical texts and artifacts, and with an introduction to critical theory and hermeneutical complexities. [Auditors with faculty permission]

LIVING TRADITION (HS-1220)

Credits:3

A introduction to theology and ministry in the Lutheran context with special attention given to Martin Luther's life and basic theological writings, the subsequent influences of Orthodoxy and Pietism, the Neo-Lutheranism(s) of the 19th century, and the Luther Renaissances of the 20th and 21st centuries. The course is also intended to assist students with their work in core courses that deal with questions of Lutheran identity and mission and for the kind of theological integration and reflection that takes place in the teaching parish. This course meets in a blended format. Content for the course will be delivered online. The online format will cover 49% of the class experience. The remaining 51% of the course will occur in weekly face-to-face sessions.

CH HSTRY SURVEY THRU BIOGRAPHY (HS-1252)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to the History of Christianity using biographies as lenses into important eras, though an overview of the entire sweep of the history of Christianity will be provided. The course will focus on important cultural and theological issues as well as introduce the student to necessary skills for using historical analysis in his or her ministry or professional life. Evaluation will be based on three written assignments and informed class participation. [40 max enrollment; Auditors with permission of Faculty]

HSTRY XIANITY & SOCIAL CHANGE (HS-1750)

Credits:3

HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY & SOCIAL CHANGE This is a basic history of Christianity course focused on Christianity in times of rapid social, economic, and/or political change from the second century CE to the present. Students will learn basic skills for the study and interpretation of history and the application of historical study to the concerns of the present and future. Students will use primary sources focused both on Christian participation and shaping of social change and Christian resistance to such change. The students will consider practical institutional activity and theological and intellectual foundations. This course will satisfy the History requirement for PSR MAST, MTS, MA and some MDiv students (MDiv students seeking ordination should consult a denominational advisor to make sure this course is sufficient preparation in history). [Auditors with faculty permission]

UCC HISTORY & POLITY (HS-2000)

Credits:3

Study of the history & formation of the United Church of Christ, its Congregational, Christian, Evangelical and Reformed roots, and its polity. The course, UCC Theological Issues, is also required to satisfy the denominational requirements for ordination. [Not recommended for first-year students] [Auditors excluded]

UMC HISTORY/POLITY/DOCTRINE I (HS-2001)

Credits:3

This course will study United Methodism's origins and developments, contributions, and lingering issues. It will examine the faith, spirituality, and practices expressed in individuals, movements, and institutions. This course highlights the denomination's requirements in History and Doctrine; the spring course will highlight further requirements in Doctrine and Polity. The combination of courses will explore the denomination's vision for transformational servant leadership which promotes mission and makes disciples of Jesus Christ. This course, when taken with HS 2002, fulfills the United Methodist ordination requirement in history, doctrine, and polity. It is highly recommended that students have taken or are currently enrolled in basic history and theology courses.

ETHOS, POLITY, MINISTRY OF UCC (HS-2058)

Credits:3

An introduction to the United Church of Christ's self-understanding and identity, including forms of authorized ministry, structure (local, regional, national), stated mission, resources, challenges and diversity. Students will be encouraged to become lifelong learners and teachers of these subjects in their various settings. Format is lecture, discussion, and small group work. Evaluation includes in-class participation, engagement with wider church events, short reports, and a final paper. Not recommended for first year students.

SWEDENBORG IN HISTORY (HS-2066)

Credits:3

How does a scientist become a theologian? Or even more particularly, how does a natural philosopher become a mystic? These two questions provide the orientation for this class on the thought of the scientist, visionary and theologian Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772). The course will be divided into three distinct parts. The first part situates Swedenborg historically, within the context of Enlightenment Europe and Lutheran Sweden, following the contours of his life within various broader cultural currents. The second section provides a broad survey of Swedenborg's theological writings and focuses on his theological insights including (but not limited to): correspondences, the relationship between science and creation, heaven and hell, love and wisdom, marriage, the Trinity, and Christology. The final section briefly explores the ways that the Argentinean writer Jose Louis Borges responded to Swedenborg, as a case study of Swedenborg's legacy in modern culture. Presentations, Reflection Papers, Final Research Paper. NOTE: This course is the in-class version of HS 8235 Swedenborg in History. Students wishing to take the online version of this class should register for HS 8235.

SWEDENBRGN HSTRY,POLITY,PRACT (HS-2068)

Credits:3

Lecture/seminar course covering the founding of the Swedenborgian church in England in 1790 and its development in the U.S. and Canada up to the present, especially with regard to its practice of ministry. Special attention will be given to the denomination's experience with social issues. The governing polity of all branches of Swedenborgianism will be covered.

COUNCILS OF THE EARLY CHURCH (HS-2295)

Credits:3

This course will examine the history of the Church from a historical and theological perspective, while seeking to understand how the church leaders arrived at various creedal formulations in their attempt to refute heresy and establish ^orthodox^ teaching concerning Jesus. With this in mind, we will do an in-depth study of the first four ecumenical councils. If time permits we will also examine the history and theology of the seventh council. [Auditors excluded]

AUGUSTINE (HS-2315)

Credits:3

This course will cover the life and teaching of St. Augustine. Specifically, students will do a careful reading of his works: ^The Confessions,^ ^The Trinity,^ ^Marriage and Virginity,^ and his letters, 100-155. We will also discuss Augustine's struggle with the Donatists.

HISTORY OF THE REFORMATIONS (HS-2350)

Credits:3

THIS COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT IN KOREAN. This course will survey the history of the Reformations from the late Medieval period, which saw the signs and forerunners, to the 16th-century Protestant and Catholic Reformations and to the aftermath which happened in the later centuries. Major issues will include historiography on the Reformations, the social and cultural background, the origin and context of each Reformation, the historical process and related religious, social, and political issues, and the effect of the Reformations on church and society. Evaluation: Weekly reading assignments and discussion, a short mid-term essay, and a final paper.

TRANSCENDENTALISTS US & UK (HS-2586)

Credits:3

In the period from Ralph Waldo Emerson's Divinity School Address in 1838 to the death of Margaret Fuller in 1850, Transcendentalism flourished in New England. However it also appeared in a slightly different form in Great Britain. We will examine the influences of German philosophy, Eastern scriptures, and the British Romantics on both sides of the Atlantic. We will trace the development of Transcendentalism as literary and philosophical influences translated into social reform. This course will examine Transcendentalism as a type of nineteenth century Unitarianism that persists in modern Unitarian Universalism. Most of our texts will be found online as our emphasis will be on nineteenth century documents which are out of copyright: philosophy, essays, scriptures and biographies. Students are expected to read The Transcendentalists by Barbara Packer and American Transcendentalism by Philip Gura IN ADVANCE. Course meets daily, 1/9/17-1/13/17, from 9am-5pm in SKSM Fireside Room. [Faculty Consent required; 30 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

HISTORY OF THE EASTERN CHURCH (HS-2751)

Credits:3

This course surveys the history of "Eastern" Christianity from late antiquity (age of the emperor Justinian) until the present day. The focus will be on the formation three characteristic components of Eastern Christianity: institutions, liturgy and piety, and mysticism and theology. The focus will be on Greek Christianity in the earlier part of the course and Slavic Christianity in the later.We will include Eastern Catholics, Copts, and Assyrian Churches as well as Eastern Orthodox. Relations with the Christian west will also be considered. [20 max enrollment]

CHRISTIANITY THRU CHARLEMAGNE (HS-2775)

Credits:3

Examination of Christian movement from sect to Christendom, considering social, political, and theological dimensions. We will utilize primary and secondary sources. Format: lecture and some discussion. Method of evaluation: informed participation in discussion, paper (10-15 pages on a primary text) for one half of the course and exam for the other half. [Auditors with permission of Faculty/Sig. on Reg. Card]

THE AFRICAN DIASPORA:1490-1990 (HS-3325)

Credits:3

HISTORY, RELIGION, & CULTURE Comparative historical study of blacks in West Africa, the Caribbean, and the Americas. Offered in the Black Church Africana Religious Studies program.

THE CHURCH IN NORTH AFRICA (HS-3328)

Credits:3

This course will give the student a thorough overview of North African Christianity from the second to the fifth century. We will begin with the African martyrs and then investigate the idea of how "church" was defined in North Africa through their understanding of water baptism, persecution, martyrdom, and key theological concepts such as origo and conscientia. In addition, selected readings from Tertullian, Cyprian, Petilian and Augustine will be examined.

HOMOSEXUALITY & CHRISTNTY (HS-3577)

Credits:3

This course offers an historical overview and survey of attitudes toward homoeroticism and homosexuality in ancient, medieval, and modern Christianity in the West and in present-day American Christianities. Several key figures, texts and movements will be considered and analyzed with a view toward understanding and interpreting their impact on contemporary debates. Seminar format; research paper and two (2) in-class presentations are required.

HIST XNTY IN THE PACIFIC WRLD (HS-4170)

Credits:3

This course introduces and explores the history of Christianity in the Pacific World from the 8thcentury to today considering East Asia, the Americas, the Pacific Islands and the region as a whole.. The course will engage the students in the analysis of multiple overlapping narratives, critical consideration of the development of Christianity both in its institutional forms and in its development as a religion or spirituality. The course is designed for students who are or will be doing their work somewhere in the Pacific world. The course learning activities include reading, audio and video presentations, collaborative writing and resource creation, and presentation of research. Students will become acquainted with each other through the consideration of Pacific spiritualities, student's narratives of their experience of Christianity in diverse Pacific contexts, and shared critical reading of historical texts. The course can be taken for 3 units of academic credit or for CEUs. Students taking the course for CEUs will participate in all the learning activities but will not be required to do a major research paper. [Auditors excluded]

MAINLINE PROTESTANTISM (HS-4175)

Credits:1.5

An examination of 20 selected congregational studies of the San Francisco area churches (American Baptist,Episcopal,Presbyterian, United Methodist, and UCC). This course will build upon research done during 1989-90 in order to develop an interpretive understanding of the historical and contemporary mainline Protestant church life in Northern California. [Written permission of instructor required]

WOMEN,RLGN & NATURE IN AM WEST (HS-4193)

Credits:3

WOMEN, RELIGION AND NATURE IN THE AMERICAN WEST will be organized as a seminar and focus on student research interests. The course will introduce students to women's studies and to environmental history as we explore the ways women used religious practice and ideas to express their experience of nature in the American West. Students will be expected to contribute to the class through the presentation of their research in class and writing a paper. [Auditors with Faculty permission]

THEOLOGY OF LUTHER (HS-4200)

Credits:1.5

A study of major texts emphasizing the creativity, depth, and relevance of his thought.

HSTRY OF XTNTY IN PACIFIC REGN (HS-4557)

Credits:3

HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY IN THE PACIFIC REGION Anyone doing ministry in the Pacific Northwest, California, or Hawaii will have noticed that the usual historical narratives that have helped mainline, ecumenical, and progressive Christians define their identity do not seem as relevant in the Pacific world where so many do not share the cultural and historical experience from which they derive. In this class we will take a different look at the history of Christianity in the Pacific world and work with students to build historical narratives that will inspire and undergird the work of strengthening and re-shaping Christian communities for the future. This course is to be held in Oahu, Hawaii, specific location TBD. Lodging provided for an additional fee; transportation on your own. Contact summer@psr.edu for details. NOTE: For registration & summer session policies, see www.psr.edu/summer.

NEW RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS (HS-5022)

Credits:3

This seminar will introduce students to the research field of New Religious Movements and to the structure and content of the Doctoral Program in New Religious Movements at the GTU. It will initiate students to the techniques of research, introduce some methodologies appropriate to the field of New Religious Movements, survey broadly the two historical periods (nineteenth century alternative movements and twentieth-century alternative movements), and promote skills in organizing and writing. The seminar will be geared specifically to the needs and interests of doctoral students in New Religious Movements, but students from other fields and other programs are welcome. Informed classroom participation is 75% of the final grade, final research paper or pastoral project is 25%. [Auditors with Faculty Permission]

AM RLGS HISTORY GTU ARCHIVE (HS-5057)

Credits:3

This is an archival workshop and seminar focused on the source materials in American Religious History found in the GTU Library Archives. The course will also illustrate the ways the archives in the GTU library complicate traditional narratives of American religious history. Students will learn to apply methods of archival research to their own research interests. Students will choose an archival collection for the focus of their work and students will create a set of narratives of American religious history as religious groups developed and religious people faced issues of social change, particularly on the West Coast. Students will also study historiography and apply critical historical methods to the analysis of primary research materials. Social justice, racial justice and new religious movement history, gender and queer history, Asian and Asian American religious history, denominational history, religious biography, theology, and other important topics can be explored in this class. It is a good class for students wanting to learn the techniques of archival research, the art of applying theory and method to the interpretation of archives, and the craft of writing historical essays. Students seeking dissertation topics or creative ways of approaching topics in American religions or Pacific religions will find this course helpful. Students writing dissertations or theses, who are working with archival sources may find it a useful place to share their work with colleagues. Course meets in GTU Library Conference Room. [Auditors with faculty permission]

FROM 3 POPES TO 2 COUNCILS (HS-5133)

Credits:3

After the disputed election of two Popes in 1378, Europe was uncertain which claimant was the true pope and a schism followed. Reform of the church, in head and members, was now demanded on all sides. The schism was healed through the efforts of a generation of canonists, theologians, and secular rulers, with the Church joyfully reunited through the work of the Councils of Constance (1414-18) and Basel (1431-1449). This course will cover the currents of renewal, collegiality, and reform in the Church that continued through the Catholic and Protestant reformations and which find echoes in both Vatican I and II.

HISTORY I (HS-8010)

Credits:3

CHRISTIANITY FROM JEWISH SECT TO COLONIAL RELIGION. This course is an introduction to the history of Christianity and historical theology from the second to the seventeenth centuries. During this time, Christianity developed the main features of what is today the world's largest religion. Along the way, Christianity was transformed again and again as it adapted to vastly different, changing cultural and social environments. This course is about Christianity in the real world. You will learn how to study the origins and development of beliefs and practices, but you will also study much more. The course will introduce you to the continuities and varieties of Christian experience and belief in different times and places, from the Roman Empire to Persia, China, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and you will be introduced to the complexity of Christianity's social, cultural, and political entanglements in all these places. The course will help you learn to break down real life situations and understand the fine points at which religious innovation and change occur, even when people try to resist change or return to the past. Audio files of weekly lectures, illustrated with slides, and videos are provided for each week. Readings from primary sources in translation are indicated on the course schedule. The readings will illustrate history, but more importantly, they will give you the opportunity to develop basic skills in assessing and evaluating the belief and behavior of religious communities in the real world. Weekly asynchronous exercises will ask you to apply analytical skills, draw conclusions, and communicate them to your peers. The learning community will be reinforced by periodic web conferences. You will be introduced to the history of the interpretation of the bible on the example of commentaries on the first day of creation in Genesis 1. You will learn about the historical entanglement of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. You will read and study several theological and mystical classics. You will be exposed to the politics, ideas, and actions that gave rise to Protestantism and the intimate relationship of Protestant and Catholic reforms. You will discover the birth of the tension between theology and natural science. Finally, you will be encouraged to apply the critical skills and aptitudes you are developing in your study of the past to situations of religious life, leadership, and service today.

HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY (HS-8100)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to the history of Christianity for MDiv and MA students. The course will introduce the student to the art of thinking about history as a tool for thinking about the present and future. The course will introduce significant events, people, and influences in the development of Christian life and thought. The course will be a lecture and discussion format, grades will be based on student written assignments and contribution to the content of the course through short presentations in discussions in class and online. Students will have the opportunity to focus on the historical development of their particular denominational traditions within the work of the course. This ONLINE course meets asynchronously using Moodle. It has no required meeting times. High-speed internet connection required. See http://moodle.gtu.edu/mod/resource/view.php?id=227 17 for full technology requirements.

SWEDENBORG IN HISTORY (HS-8235)

Credits:3

How does a scientist become a theologian? Or even more particularly, how does a natural philosopher become a mystic? These two questions provide the orientation for this class on the thought of the scientist, visionary and theologian Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772). The course will be divided into three distinct parts. The first part situates Swedenborg historically, within the context of Enlightenment Europe and Lutheran Sweden, following the contours of his life within various broader cultural currents. The second section provides a broad survey of Swedenborg's theological writings and focuses on his theological insights including (but not limited to): correspondences, the relationship between science and creation, heaven and hell, love and wisdom, marriage, the Trinity, and Christology. The final section briefly explores the ways that the Argentinean writer Jose Louis Borges responded to Swedenborg, as a case study of Swedenborg's legacy in modern culture. Presentations, Reflection Papers, Final Research Paper. NOTE: This course is the ONLINE version of HS 2066 Swedenborg in History. Only students taking the course as an online course should register using this course number; all others should register for HS 2066. This course meets at posted course meeting times using Adobe Connect, and you must be available in your corresponding time zone to participate in class. A webcam, high speed internet connection, and the latest version of Flash is required.

SWEDENBORG IN HISTORY (HS-8266)

Credits:3

This course will engage Swedenborg broadly in history, beginning with his sources in such various specific contexts as radical Pietistism, neoplatonic Christian thought, Cartesian rationalism, and Western hermeticism. The majority of the course will focus on the varied reception of Swedenborg's thought at different cultural moments, including English and German Romanticism (Blake, Schelling), the French Symbolist writers (Baudelaire, but also some earlier Balzac), Transcendentalism (Emerson), Spiritualism, New Thought, and early American religious pluralism. Special attention will be given to Swedenborg's formative influence on nineteenth century American visual arts (Inness, Powers, Keith, Blakelock), as well as the denominational histories of the sectarian churches around the world that bear his name. This course is intended as a follow-up to Introduction to Swedenborgian Thought, though students need not have taken that as a prerequisite for this course. NOTE: This course is the ONLINE version of HS 2066 Swedenborg in History. Only students taking the course as an online course should register using this course number; all others should register for HS 2066. This course meets at posted course meeting times using Adobe Connect, and you must be available in your corresponding time zone to participate in class. A webcam, high speed internet connection, and the latest version of Flash is required. [Intended audience: M.Div., M.A., M.T.S.]

HOMOSEXUALITY & XIAN TRADITION (HS-8357)

Credits:3

This course offers an historical overview and survey of attitudes toward homoeroticism and homosexuality in ancient, medieval, and modern Christianity in the West and in present-day American Christianities. Several key figures, texts and movements will be considered and analyzed with a view toward understanding and interpreting their impact on contemporary debates. Seminar format; research paper and two (2) In-Class presentations are required. This ONLINE course meets asynchronously using Moodle. It has no required meeting times. High- speed internet connection required. See http:// moodle.gtu.edu/mod/resource/view.php?id=22717 for full technology requirements. [PIN code required; Auditors excluded]

HSTRY OF XTNTY IN PACIFIC REG (HS-8417)

Credits:3

HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY IN THE PACIFIC REGION, a course designed as an elective for MDiv, MA, DMin and PhD students. The usual historical narratives that have helped mainline, ecumenical, and progressive American Christians define their identity do not seem as relevant in the Pacific world where so many do not share the cultural and historical experience from which these narratives derive. In this class we will take a different look at the history of Christianity in the Pacific world and work to build historical narratives that will inspire and undergird the work of strengthening and re-shaping Christian communities for the future and illuminate the relevance of Christian thought and practice for addressing the problems facing Pacific societies. Students will learn skills for finding and interpreting sources of information about history, creating plausible historical narratives, and viewing historical events and persons from more than one point of view. This is an ONLINE course. There will be 4 synchronous webinars scheduled after the first meeting of the class and is otherwise asynchronous. The course will be available on the GTU Moodle platform and will involve students in a number of learning experiences. Grades will be based on written work in the class, the quality of engagement in class conversations, quizzes, and small collaborative projects. PhD students will be expected to use more than one language in their research work. [Auditors excluded]

UCC HISTORY & POLITY (HSFT-2006)

Credits:4.5

This course about UCC denominational ethos, history, theology, polity and ministry, satisfies the requirement in these areas for authorized ministry in the UCC. The course format is 3 units in the classroom and 1.5 units online for a total of 4.5 credit hours using primarily written assignments, online exercises and forums, in-class informed discussion for evaluation. Students will prepare for the written and discussion portions of the class with reading and participation in particular UCC events. [Auditors with faculty permission]

ETHOS,POLITY,MINISTRY OF UCC (HSFT-2058)

Credits:3

An introduction to the United Church of Christ's self-understanding and identity, including core values, forms of authorized ministry, structure (local, regional, national), mission, resources, challenges, and diversity. Students are encouraged to become lifelong learners and teachers of these subjects in their various settings. Format is reading, lecture, discussion, online posts and short papers. Evaluation includes in-class participation, engagement with wider church events, short papers, and a final presentation. Not recommended for first year students. Along with UCC history and theology (HSST8201 SP2016), this course satisfies the educational requirement of UCC Conferences and Associations.

GRACE UPON:UMC HISTORY/POLITY (HSFT-2064)

Credits:3

GRACE UPON GRACE: UNITED METHODIST CHURCH (UMC) HISTORY & POLITY

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST HISTORY (HSFT-8462)

Credits:3

This course begins with a discussion of recent historical developments in Unitarian Universalism and then extends back through time to the various antecedents of Unitarianism and Universalism in pre-Reformation Europe, all the way back to the early church and the Council of Nicea. Students will have the opportunity to explore Unitarian Universalist heritage, as well as different historical approaches. We will examine social location in relation to class, race, and gender identities, and how these enabled or impeded social justice advances. We will discover the origins of our faith by progressing from our known contemporary experience to the unknown, and perhaps unknowable. Along the way we will consider various theological developments within this tradition, as expressed through various identities and the challenges presented by new modalities of faith including Transcendentalism and Humanism. Sources will range from primary sources to anecdote, with an emphasis on articulating contemporary experience in the context of historical identity and experience. [Faculty Consent required; 30 max enrollment]

INTRODUCTION TO JUDAISM (HSHR-2035)

Credits:3

Exploring texts from biblical, intertestamental, rabbinic, medieval, and modern periods, this course will introduce students to diverse Jewish cultural expressions and core beliefs-from God, Torah, Israel to contemporary thought; history-from the Genesis narratives to the Holocaust, the creation of the State of Israel and modern Jewish Movements; and life and holiday cycles-including the liturgical calendar and celebrations. Focus on adaptation of religion and culture to changing times and circumstances will deepen an understanding of the origins and transformative nature of Jewish identity.

RLGS FNDTNS US SOCIAL MOVMNTS (HSHR-2520)

Credits:3

RELIGIOUS FOUNDATIONS OF US SOCIAL MOVEMENTS Intended for MDiv, MA, and PhD students, this course will explore the religious foundations of several U.S. social justice movements of the 20th century including the Civil Rights Movement, Women's Movement, LGBTQ Movement, and Environmental Justice Movements. The historical, cultural, and economic aspects of these various movements will be considered with the aim of understanding how religion informed these calls for deep and lasting change within U.S. culture. Several class presentations and a final research paper will be required.

FAITH AND WILDERNESS IN USA (HSHR-2541)

Credits:3

A critical survey of Christianity's encounter with the American wilderness. How have memories and mythologies of the frontier affected American religion? How did Christian images, beliefs and symbols interact with diverse social, ecological, and political aspects of American wilderness? Seminar with student presentation and final paper. Evaluation based on student participation and paper. This course is co-taught by PhD student Jason van Boom with a Newhall Award.

SWEDENBORG IN HISTORY (HSHR-4001)

Credits:3

This course will substantially engage with one strand of Swedenborg's thought in cultural history: the ways his particular conceptualizations of mind, body, and soul impacted various alternative medicine currents in the 19th century, largely within an American context. We will begin by situating Swedenborg's work as a scientist and visionary theologian within different interpretative frameworks, from western esotericism to wisdom literature, seeking to underscore the continuities between Swedenborg's science and religion. The majority of the course will then focus on various fields where his role as ^visionary scientist^ or ^scientific mystic became amplified and transformed, from spiritualism and mesmerism, to osteopathy, to the emergence of the New Thought movement. This course is intended as a follow-up to ^Introduction to Swedenborgian Thought,^ though students need not have taken that as a prerequisite for this course. One critical goal of this course for students in the ordination track for becoming clergy affiliated with the Swedenborgian Church of North America is to facilitate thinking about Swedenborg's cultural reception outside of denominational history as a resource for ministry: to better understand Swedenborg's strong, if diffuse, presence within American esotericism.

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST HISTORY (HSHR-4017)

Credits:3

This course begins with an examination of the (alleged) antecedents to Unitarianism and Universalism in pre-Reformation Europe. We begin with development of Unitarianism in Poland, Transylvania, and England, then on to that of North American Unitarianism through its classical age, the Transcendentalist development, and the various crises of identity and purpose that develop into and through the late 19th and 20th centuries. Then we turn our attention to Universalist ascendency, decline, and then consolidation with Unitarianism. Careful attention will be paid throughout to the Unitarian/Universalist social location in relationship to class, race, and gender identities, and how these sometimes enabled and sometimes impaired social justice advances. Students will need to read David Robinson's Unitarians and Universalists before class begins, and will be responsible for a final paper or project due three week's after the end of class. Class meets weekdays, 1/5/14-1/9/14, from 9:00am-5:00pm, at SKSM Fireside Room. [25 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

READINGS IN THE ZOHAR (HSHR-4115)

Credits:3

We will explore the Zohar's mystical interpretation of the Torah. Major themes includes: the sefirot (facets of the divine personality), Shekhinah (the feminine aspect of God), and the various levels of meaning of the biblical text (literal, midrashic and esoteric). The selections from the Zohar will be studied in English, based on one volume of The Zohar: Pritzker Edition. Reference will also be made to the original Aramaic and Hebrew.

WADING IN TROUBLED WATERS (HSRA-4050)

Credits:3

The "Negro Spirituals" grew out of a people's determination to build beloved community and assert the divine spirit of their humanity under brutally dehumanizing conditions. In doing so, these people also breathed new life into a religious tradition that had been de-spiritualized by the debauchery and greed of their oppressors. These same enslaved Africans also launched a renaissance of arts and culture in the dominant society that still continues, centuries later. Similarly powerful assertions of music, spirit, and community can be observed throughout the worldwide African Diaspora, and traced to deep and ancient roots on the African continent. This Sankofa workshop looks back at such cross-generational movements of "grass-roots" social and spiritual change to retrieve time-tested conceptual frameworks for wading in the troubled waters of today, such as school-to-prison pipelines in communities of color, which seem to flow from sources similar to those addressed in the Spirituals. [15 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

HIST OF POVERTY IN US & RC CH (HSRS-2490)

Credits:3

Though the United States has always been regarded as a land of plenty, not all Americans have been able to enjoy its bounty. Since the nation's inception, the poverty of some has been a reality. This course will chart the ebb and flow of poverty in the history of the United States, the nation's response and atitudes towards poverty, and the Roman Catholic Church's response to that poverty. Lecture format with research paper required. [Max enrollment 25]

MODERN SOCIAL JUSTICE PRPHTS (HSRS-3040)

Credits:3

Christian and Jewish sources have mandated social justice as an integral part of their tradition. This course will use a biographical approach to examine men and women whose lives have embodied that social justice tradition and who have served as prophets to their era. Included will be Walter Rauschenbusch, Mother Jones, Jane Addams, Reinhold Niebuhr, A.J. Muste, Dorothy Day, Daniel Berrigan, Thomas Merton, Cesar Chavez, Howard Thurman, Martin Luther King, Jr., Patty Crowley, Oscar Romero, Jim Wallis. Lecture format with a research paper required. [25 max enrollment; Auditors with Faculty permission]

WOMEN IN CHRISTIAN TRADITION (HSRS-8200)

Credits:3

This course uses feminist, womanist, postcolonial, decolonial, and queer theoretical lenses to analyze the construction of "woman" in Christian tradition throughout the early, medieval, early modern, modern, and postmodern/contemporary periods. The course's asynchronous online format includes video lectures, posted readings, and online discussions. Evaluation methods include weekly participation in online discussions, a group presentation (online), two reflection papers, and a final paper or project (student choice in consultation with professor). Designed for MTS students but also open to MDiv and MA students. 12 max enrollment, with JST students receiving priority enrollment. [Faculty Consent required; 12 max enrollment]

HIST OF XNITY & SOCIAL CHANGE (HSRS-8259)

Credits:3

History of Christianity and Social Change is a basic course in the History of Christianity focused on ways Christianity contributed to and was shaped by social, economic, and or political change, from the 2nd century to the present. It is designed primarily as an elective for the PSR MAST Program but will serve as a basic course in History for the PSR MDiv or Common MA. It is a mostly asynchronous online course with a variety of activities found on the GTU Moodle platform. There will be four required 1 hour synchronous webinars during the semester at times will set together when the course begins. Students will learn basic skills for the study and interpretation of history - how to find and evaluate information about the past, how to interpret texts and artifacts, and skills in the application of historical study to the concerns of the present and future by creating plausible narratives. Grading will be based on participation in written discussion forums on Moodle, completion of interactive or collaborative exercises, and three short written papers demonstrating the student's ability to find and interpret information and shape plausible historical narratives. Students looking for a course focused primarily on denominational institutional developments or primarily historical theology should consider other options. [Auditors with faculty permission]

FDNS OF FRNCISCAN SPRITUALITY (HSSP-1360)

Credits:3

Using historical, biographical, theological, and literary methods of analysis, this course will examine the foundational spiritual experience of Francis and Clare of Assisi and their expressions of this in their vernacular theology. Themes treated will include the significance of their movement within the ecclesiastical and social world of their times, their appeal to the lay world, their personal and fraternal journeys, struggles with authority, and the basic spiritual elements of their vision. Course will use primarily their own writings with lecture, secondary readings, class discussion, periodic reports, and final paper.

LAY SPIRITUAL PRACTICES (HSSP-2460)

Credits:3

This class will explore through experience and study a broad range of spiritual activities used by lay Christians and will look at the historical origins and early developments of them. Pilgrimage, prayer, contemplation, storytelling, fasting, feasting, sexuality and celibacy, festivals and processions are among the practices we will explore together. The historical and cultural background of these practices brings out new aspects of even the most common of these practices. For example, the act of reading psalms and prayers will be discussed in its medieval mode as a form of body prayer. Through discussion of some primary texts and a range of secondary texts, participants will explore ways to adopt and adapt spiritual practices for the 21st century. Evaluation based on research paper, class participation, and oral presentations. [PIN code required; 15 max enrollment]

WOMEN IN RELIGIOUS LEADERSHIP (HSSP-2580)

Credits:3

This course is an intermediate course exploring the history of women in leadership roles within Christianity. Methodologically, the course explores the topic of how women have achieved leadership roles throughout Christian history, therefore the lectures will be historical in nature and students will be expected to use historical method in their analyses. There will be ample room for student-generated input based on experience and research. In fact, students must anticipate being active co-creators of this course, since the topic is too broad for any single professor to teach in a comprehensive way. Evaluation is based on student participation, oral presentations, research paper and book review. NOTE: This course is co-taught by GTU PhD student Rachel Wheeler, with a Newhall Award.

DESERT SPIRITUALITY (HSSP-2771)

Credits:3

In this course we will study the writings of the fourth- and fifth-century desert fathers and mothers who devoted their lives to ascetic practice and contemplative prayer. Using the lens of Christian spirituality as an academic discipline, our principal task will be to discover how these texts communicate religious experience and transformation and how they remain relevant to readers in the 21st century. Class format will involve lecture and discussion; evaluation will be based on student participation, short writing assignments or a single longer paper, and a final exam. Some knowledge of early Christian history is helpful but not required. Suitable for students with academic and/or pastoral interests. NOTE: This course is taught by PhD student Rachel Wheeler with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Arthur Holder.

ENGLISH SPIRITUALTY & MYSTICS (HSSP-3901)

Credits:3

This course will cover the history of Christian spirituality in the British Isles prior to the Protestant Reformation, including Celtic spirituality, Romano-British Christianity, Anglo-Saxon spirituality, and medieval English mysticism. By analyzing primary texts and reflecting on personal experiences with spiritual practices students will be able to contextualize sources historically while also using their own experience as an interpretive lens. Students will gain an in-depth knowledge of a particular text, theme, or figure of English spirituality (of their choosing) and a broad knowledge of the various theologies and spiritualities that formed and eventually produced the distinctive flavor of Anglicanism and its many offshoots. Students will be required to write seven reflection papers and one final 5-7 page research paper, which they will present to the class. The format of the class will involve lecture and discussion.

MEDIEVAL MYSTICS SEMINAR (HSSP-4342)

Credits:3

The students of this seminar will read and discuss representative Christian mystics from the period 1000-1600. Each meeting will focus on a particular group of mystics. Students will prepare individual oral reports on their particular readings and give them during each session. After the reports the rest of the time will be devoted to general discussion and comparison of the texts. Those taking this course at the doctoral level (HSSP 5474) will do all the course work required in the 4000 level version. In addition, they will read a secondary book on the author(s) studied each week; and write a longer serious research paper, for which the authors considered are read in the original languages. Students considering this option should make an appointment to consult with the instructor before the beginning of term. [6 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

HISTORY OF XTN SPIRITUALITY (HSSP-5000)

Credits:3

This seminar is primarily intended for doctoral students and other advanced GTU students interested in studying the history of Christian Spirituality at the doctoral level. This course will emphasize methods of analyzing texts and secondary literature which will help prepare students to conduct research in the area and to teach in the area of Christian Spirituality. Evaluation is based on class participation; two written book reviews; and a final research project presented in both written and oral form. [15 max enrollment; PIN code required]

INTRO XTN THLGY & HISTORY II (HSST-1061)

Credits:3

Theology, or ^God-talk,^ was defined long ago as ^faith seeking understanding^ (Anselm). This course offers a space to continue a search that Christians (and non-Christians) have engaged in for millenia. We learn from the wisdom and the shortcomings of those who have preceded us in seeking to talk meaningfully about the divine. We also learn from contemporary quests and concerns as we become active participants in the theological process today. [STHS 1060]

EARLIEST CHRISTIANS & CHRIST (HSST-1092)

Credits:3

Focused on the period 50 BCE-100 CE, this course explores the historical and theological ^ground^ in which earliest Christian theologies grew. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the Roman and Jewish ^worlds^ of Jesus and Jesus' followers, including Paul. In addition, the course closely examines several New Testament Christological proclamations. Class format includes: Group discussion and lecture. Evaluation based on participation and four short papers.

HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY II (HSST-1112)

Credits:3

This course will concentrate on the 16th-century reformation and then explore selected developments in the following centuries chosen for their importance in understanding the challenges of contemporary ministry. Emphasis on reading primary texts and focus on issues of defining the church, the basis for truth claims, and the social and political contexts of Christian witness.

HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY II (HSST-1115)

Credits:3

Introduction to the history of the Church, from the fifteenth century through the twentieth. The focus will be on the western (Latin) Church. The course will focus on primary sources attached to key events, with lectures and class discussions. The course will be evaluated through short papers on the primary sources (3 papers of 4-5 pages each). The course is intended for MDiv and MA/MTS students. [Auditors with faculty permission]

UCC HISTORY & THEOLOGY (HSST-2017)

Credits:3

This course will introduce students to the history of the UCC and its antecedent traditions, the cultural issues and theological developments that have shaped the denomination. Each student will be expected to write a research paper and participate in an oral final exam. Course work including the Reformation recommended. [One year of seminary study; Auditors with Faculty permission]

ANCIENT/MEDIEVAL JEWISH CVLZTN (HSST-2022)

Credits:3

This seminar will examine ancient and Medieval Jewish history as well as the historical-critical methodology that often shapes such an inquiry. We will explore Jewish civilization from its beginnings in ancient Israel through the medieval period and will conclude the seminar with a discussion of more recent attempts to characterize Judaism in light of modern historicist critique. This course is required for all MA and certificate students at CJS.

HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY II (HSST-2115)

Credits:3

HISTORY/THEOLOGY:MODERN CHURCH (HSST-2189)

Credits:3

HISTORY AND THEOLOGY OF THE MODERN CHURCH This course will survey some of the major topics and themes in the historical development of Christian churches and theological ideas in western Europe, Britain and North America from the beginning of the 16th to the middle of the 20th centuries. We will consider how institutional churches, groups and movements contributed to and responded to both the challenges and opportunities of the modern period and how modernity has shaped today's religious landscape. We will examine a variety of Christian denominations even as we focus primarily on Anglican traditions. Three short papers and regular, active participation in discussion. Previous courses in early, medieval, and reformation periods are recommended.

THE HISTORICAL JESUS: AN INTRO (HSST-2680)

Credits:3

THE HISTORICAL JESUS- AN INTRODUCTION: This 3-unit course introduces students to "the quest for the historical Jesus" by pursuing a close reading, analysis, study, and discussion of William Herzog's work, "Prophet and Teacher: An Introduction to the Historical Jesus" (2005). [Auditors with faculty permission]

LUTHERAN CONFESSIONAL WRITINGS (HSST-2902)

Credits:3

This course will examine the writings of the ^Book of Concord^ in their historical context, as theological documents, and with regard to their importance for contemporary proclamation and pastoral care. Lecture/discussion; midterm and final case studies. Required for second-year PLTS MDiv students and PLTS MTS and MCM students not taking HS 1102, HS 1112, or HS 2012. [ST 1200, ST 2003, ST 1004, or Faculty permission]

UCC HISTORY & THEOLOGY (HSST-4070)

Credits:3

This is the second part of a two-part sequence of courses in UCC History and Polity required as part of the preparation for ordination in the denomination. This course meets several of the requirements listed in the "Marks of Faithful Ministry in the UCC" document. Students in this course should have completed HSST 2058 UCC Ethos, Polity and Ministry or an equivalent UCC polity course. This course is not appropriate for students in their first year of theological studies; it depends upon knowledge of exegetical methods, history of Christianity, and the basics of theology. The course format is a combination of lecture and class discussion based on reading. The course content focuses on the history and theological traditions of the United Church of Christ and prepares students to understand and teach these traditions and practices in the church, to be informed about the complexities that come with participation in a united and uniting church, and to envision new ways of being the church rooted in an authentic UCC heritage and a deep engagement with its theological traditions. The format of the course includes lecture, discussion, reading and building historiographical and theological skills. Grades will be based on participation in collaborative in-class work, a research project focused on a historical and/or theological issue in the church, and an oral exam. Auditors seeking to use the course for purposes of achieving ministerial standing in the UCC must complete all assignments.

MOTHER OF GOD THLGY IN CULTURE (HSST-4180)

Credits:3

Throughout history Eastern Christians have honored the Virgin Mary as "Mother of God," "Champion Leader," "Ever-virgin," "Steadfast Shelter and Refuge," "Joy of All Who Sorrow," "The One Who Guides," and continue to address her with many other titles. The figure of the Theotokos (Mother of God) influences all phases of life including theology, politics, culture, social justice, art, literature, feminism, music, and personal devotion. Today many Christians have forgotten her crucial role in the divine plan for restoration of creation. This course will expose students to a greater theological understanding of the person of Mary by exploring iconography, hymnology, and patristic theology. Beginning from an examination of her depiction in scripture (both canonical and gnostic) and her historical significance for Christology, students will see how Mary is lauded through cultural expressions (art, music, poetry, etc.). While the focus will be on Eastern Christian traditions, the course will also include other theologies, depictions, and cultural appreciations of Mary. The course, designed for Masters students but welcoming Doctoral students, will integrate both lecture and seminar, with emphasis on lively discussion. Evaluation will be based on classroom participation and two written papers of academic quality.

LUTHER, THE BIBLE, & THE JEWS (HSST-4204)

Credits:3

Martin Luther did not know any practicing Jews but he wrote about the Jewish faith throughout his career. He inherited and developed ingredients for a Christian theology and biblical hermeneutics that are of supersessionist nature. This seminar will probe the logic, ingredients, and context of Luther's comments about the Jews, particularly in his biblical hermeneutics and Christology. Attention will be given to his predecessors and contemporaries, as well as (select) subsequent appropriations of anti-Jewish ideologies in the early twentieth-century. In the post-Holocaust world of theology and history writing, and prompted by the 500th anniversary of the Reformation in 2017, a critical re-assessment of the legacy of one of the most influential Christian teachers facilitates the necessary theological adjustments with the fundamentals of Christian faith for the sake of its transformative relevance in today's global and inter-faith context. This 4000-level course is open to advanced Master's level students and PhD candidates. Course meets in GTU Library Conference Room.

HSTRY/THLGY FRANCISCAN TRADTN (HSST-4310)

Credits:3

This course will study the history and theology of the Franciscan tradition of spiritual experience/ theology through an examination of primary sources. Attention will be given to the emergence of the vernacular tradition in Francis and Clare, the scholastic maturation in Robert Grosseteste, Alexander of Hales, Bonaventure, Peter John Olivi, and John Duns Scotus. Topics covered will include: the social location of the theology and its situation within other theological traditions, the Trinitarian and Christological foundations, the turn toward the particular, the implications for political and economic thought, relevance for today. Lecture and group discussion, class readings, presentations, and final paper.

HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY II (HSST-8100)

Credits:3

This course will concentrate on the 16th-century reformation and then explore selected developments in the following centuries chosen for their importance in understanding the challenges of contemporary ministry. Emphasis on reading primary texts and focus on issues of defining the church, the basis for truth claims, and the social and political contexts of Christian witness. Lecture/discussion; 25-30 page journal on the reading and class material.

UCC HISTORY AND THEOLOGY (HSST-8201)

Credits:3

This course introduces and explores the history and theology of the United Church of Christ. It is mainly for MDiv students. It satisfies the requirement for study of UCC history and theology for students seeking ordination in that denomination. Ordained clergy interested in or seeking standing in the UCC are welcome. It also is available to MDiv or MA students interested in denominational history or progressive theologies in the United States. The course uses reading, collaborative writing and resource creation, independent research and presentation of findings, audio and video presentations and online forum style discussion to map the complex picture of UCC history and engage the main theological concerns of the denomination and its diverse members. Forms of UCC spiritual practice will also be introduced. The course can be taken for 3 units of academic credit or for CEUs. An initial webinar will be scheduled the first week of the semester in consultation with students registered by the first day of the semester. NOTE: This ONLINE course meets primarily asynchronously using Moodle (http://gtu.edu/library/students/moodle-help). High-speed internet connection required. Occasional synchronous class meetings will be scheduled. A telephone, webcam, high speed internet connection, and the latest version of Flash are required. [Auditors excluded]

UCC HSTRY/POLITY AT SYNOD (HSST-8225)

Credits:3

UCC HISTORY AND POLITY AT GENERAL SYNOD 2013 This is a course in the History, Faith, and Polity of the United Church of Christ. It is designed to satisfy academic requirements in UCC History and Theology for people preparing for authorized ministry in the UCC, and also to provide an introduction for ministers from other denominations seeking privilege of call or ministerial standing in the UCC. Interested lay people are welcome to audit the course. The course will have, in addition to the two week intensive session following the Synod, four online sessions starting in May. Auditors using the course for privilege of call or for preparation for ordination, please note: you will need to complete all the assignments that those taking the course for credit do. The course will be held in LONG BEACH, CA and students will have room and board locally. The class will meet at or near the Convention Center and attend Synod sessions. Separate registration for Synod is required. The ONLINE portion of this course meets asynchronously using Moodle. It has no required meeting times. High-speed internet connection required. See http://moodle.gtu.edu/mod/resource/view.php?id=227 17 for full technology requirements.

SPECIAL TOPICS (HSST-9100)

Credits:3

SECTION 1: READING CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY IN CONTEXT Students will engage Christian voices and signature works in light of changing contexts, learning about the roots, developments, and diversity of Christian theological orientations. The course begins with the formation of Christian beliefs, the ecumenical Creeds, and documents from the early church; continues with medieval and Reformation era mystics and theologians; and then turns to a selection of modern treatises. While the course provides a historical survey through the centuries, the focus is on theological developments and critical consideration of core Christian texts and teachings with, e.g., feminist hermeneutics.

SPECIAL TOPICS (HSST-9810)

Credits:3

FALL 2017 Section 01 READING CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY IN CONTEXT Students will engage Christian voices and signature works in light of changing contexts, learning about the roots, developments, and diversity of Christian theological orientations. The online course begins with the formation of Christian beliefs, the ecumenical Creeds, and documents from the early church; continues with medieval and Reformation era mystics and theologians; and then turns to a selection of modern treatises. While the course provides a historical survey through the centuries, the focus is on theological developments and critical consideration of core Christian texts and teachings with, e.g., feminist hermeneutics.