Course Information

 

for A. Interdisciplinary Studies Department


ART OF ACADEMIC WRITING (IDS-0001)

Credits:0

THE ART AND TECHNIQUE OF EFFECTIVE ACADEMIC WRITING This writing course is designed to orient students to the primary types of academic writing they will be asked to do during their years at PSR and the Graduate Theological Union (GTU), including reflection papers, research papers, critical essays and exegetical papers. The course is intended to help students learn or "dust off" the writing skills they will need to succeed academically while in seminary. Through online lectures and discussions, extensive exercises, and brief homework assignments, participants will learn the art and technique of composing critical writing in a U.S. academic setting. Among other topics, this course will cover: developing a topic; identifying reliable resources; reading and note-taking; constructing a thesis; writing and revising the outline, body, introduction and conclusion of a paper; formatting footnotes and bibliography; and preparing an audience-oriented summary of a paper. Participants will also learn how to identify and use the online resources of the GTU library. Finally, the course will introduce PSR's Plagiarism Policy and will offer students strategies for avoiding plagiarism. This ONLINE course meets asynchronously using Moodle, 7/6/15-7/24/15. It has no required meeting times. High-speed internet connection required. See http://moodle.gtu.edu/mod/resource/view.php?id=227 17 for full technology requirements.

ART OF ACADEMIC WRITING (IDS-0800)

Credits:0

This intensive course is designed to orient students to the primary types of academic writing generally assigned at PSR and the Graduate Theological Union (GTU), including reflection papers, research papers, critical essays, and exegetical papers. The course is intended to help students learn or "dust off" the writing skills they will need to succeed academically while in seminary. Through lectures, online discussions, written exercises, reading assignments, and one-on-one check-ins with the instructor, participants will learn the art and technique of composing critical writing in a U.S. academic setting. Among other topics, this course will cover: developing a topic; identifying reliable resources; reading and note-taking; constructing a thesis; writing and revising the outline, body, introduction, and conclusion of a paper; and formatting footnotes and bibliography. Participants will also learn how to identify and use online resources available through the GTU library. Finally, the course will introduce PSR's Plagiarism Policy and will offer strategies for avoiding plagiarism in a U.S. context. Please note: This is an intensive course. We will be covering seven weeks of material in just three weeks. Successful learning in this course will require a significant daily time commitment-up to three hours some days-from participants. This ONLINE course meets asynchronously using Moodle (http://gtu.edu/library/students/moodle-help). High-speed internet connection required. [Occasional synchronous class meetings maybe scheduled; see syllabus for details.] NOTE: For registration & summer session policies, see www.psr.edu/summer.

THLGY & ETHICS IN XTN HSTRY I (IDS-1021)

Credits:4.5

The goal is to help students gain a knowledge of and skill in each of the disciplines of history, theology, and ethics, not simply as singular entities but also in interdisciplinary/mutual interaction. It is our hope that, by the end of the course, students will understand that an adequate approach to and knowledge of Christian history requires critical engagement with theology and ethics, of theology with history and ethics. This class is intended for PSR 2nd year MDiv students. One 3-hour lecture and one 1.5-hour discussion section. This is the first half of a year-long course which must be taken with IDS 1022 in the spring. [Auditors excluded]

JR COLLOQUIUM THEORY/PRAXIS I (IDS-1261)

Credits:3

This course introduces first year MDiv students to an integrative and interdisciplinary approach to Christian thought and praxis. Students will be required to integrate the traditional theological disciplines (Biblical Studies, Church History, and Systematic Theology) with their observations during ministry site visits. The goal of the course is to enable students to develop Christian worldviews and vocational visions that can inform faithful and effective leadership in the Church of the 21st century. During the first half of the semester, the class will meet on Monday and Wednesday evenings for seven theoretical sessions followed by seven context group sessions. This pattern will repeat itself in the second half of the semester. Each class session will incorporate lecture and group discussions of lecture and reading for that week. In addition, there will be a web based discussion board that students will be required to engage on a weekly basis.

JR COLLOQUIUM THEORY/PRAXIS II (IDS-1263)

Credits:3

This course introduces first year MDiv students to an integrative/interdisciplinary approach to Christian thought and praxis. Students will be required to integrate introductory material from three traditional theological disciplines (Biblical Studies, Church History, and Systematic Theology). The course will assist the student in acquiring critical reading, thinking and writing skills; a socio-cultural and theological overview of the OT; the ability to identify and discuss key issues, events and figures in the history of Christianity; as well as a familiarity with the wide range of theological approaches within the Christian tradition.

JR COLLOQIUM: OLD TESTAMENT (IDS-1271)

Credits:3

The successful student will acquire a socio-cultural and theological overview of the Old Testament that focuses on basic content as well as critical issues and exegetical and hermeneutical methodologies. In addition, students will be challenged to become self-aware concerning their own social location and its relationship to reading, thinking, and doing biblical, historical, and theological work associated with the critical issues of the day. Assignments include: four short exegetical papers and one book review.

ART OF THEOLOGICAL WRITING (IDS-1301)

Credits:1.5

This intensive course is designed to orient students to the primary types of academic writing generally assigned at PSR and the Graduate Theological Union (GTU). As the title indicates, theological writing is an art form that "makes sense" in its own context. In order to write well however, one must be able to read well. Reading well goes far beyond mere comprehension and literacy; reading well means to be able to competently track the argument/s in the essay and to present counter arguments or deeper arguments in turn. Reading well will also help in writing well. A well-presented, well-researched and well-argued essay is a model to build on. We shall follow this method in class, aiming to write the outline for a 20 page research paper by asking the following questions: What is the context of the theological essay? What is formal writing? What is the difference between a "research essay" and "reflection paper?" How does one make a theological argument? How are references to be cited? What is a properly formatted paper? What is the value of revision and rewriting? These exercises are meant to help you to prepare to write a "final twenty-page paper" for a "course" in Queer Theology. Please note: This is an intensive course. We will be covering seven weeks of material in just three weeks. Successful learning in this course will require a significant daily time commitment-up to three hours some days-from participants. Course meets daily MTW 1/2/18- 1/17/18, from 5-6:30pm, at Holbrook 124.

MULTIRELIGIOUS CORE INTENSIVE (IDS-1400)

Credits:3

Multireligious Intensive: Amidst the Blessing of the Ancestors weaves teachings on organic multireligiosity from Ibrahim Baba (Dr. Ibrahim Farajae) with practices of ancestor reverence and healing. According to Ibrahim Baba, organic multiregliosity “interrupts practices of considering religions as monolithic, rigidly-separated traditions in conflict with one another [and] rather understands them as having complex and constantly-morphing relationships in successive generations and in ever-widening geographical and cultural contexts.” His intensive focuses on embodying multireligiosity in personal practice, tending multireligiosity in spiritual leadership and public worship, and engaging multireligiosity toward countering oppression and cultural (mis)appropriation. The intensive engages embodied practice around ancestor reverence and healing - in spiritual lineage and family / blood lineage - as a way of anchoring multireligious expression, countering oppression, and aligning to blessing. Each day of the intensive combines conceptual exploration of multireligiosity, embodied practice of counter-oppressive devotion and tending work in ancestral lineage ritual and repair. Course texts include multi-media selections from Ibrahim Baba, The Cave of the Heart by Swami Abishiktananda and Ancestral Medicine by Daniel Foor. Prior to the intensive, students are expected to complete selected readings as well as to submit a reflection paper on personal experiences of multireligiosity and ancestral tending. At the completion of the course, students submit a second reflection paper weaving together their learning and experiences in the intensive. This is a required course for SKSM MDiv and MASC students. Relates to SKSM Thresholds 1 & 2 and MFC Comps 3, 5 & 7. Course meets daily, 1/21/2019-1/25/2019, from 9am-5pm at SKSM. [Faculty consent required; 20 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

MIDDLR COLLOQUIUM PRACTICUM II (IDS-2262)

Credits:3

This course is a continuation of the two-semester practicum portion of Middle Colloquium. It is an interdisciplinary two-semester approach to contextual (field) education. Students continue serving in their ministry or community settings (begun in September). The course emphasizes various ministerial arts (baptism, Lord's Supper, weddings, funerals) and interfaces with Middler Colloquium Theory II (IDS 2263). [Completion of IDS 2260 and IDS 2261]

MIDDLER COLLOQUIUM THEORY II (IDS-2263)

Credits:3

This course is a continuation of the two-semester theory portion of Middler Colloquium. It is an interdisciplinary course that emphasizes the study of the New Testament (Pauline letters). This course interfaces with the Middler Colloquium Practicum II (IDS 2262). [Completion of IDS 2260 and IDS 2261]

THE LUMINOUS DARKNESS (IDS-2500)

Credits:3

What does it mean to radiate, love and embrace the luminous dark? How do we create a sacred relationship with death? This course counters cultural contexts and spiritual teachings which elevate light and life while fearing, demonizing or invisibilizing their counterparts. In The Luminous Dark, we explore sacred darkness and conscious dying in an earth-honoring framework, through embodied healing practices, Jewish mystical and Islamic Sufi teachings, and with a trauma-informed, counter-oppressive lens. This course weaves text-based learning with psycho-spiritual inquiry, written reflections and ritual practice, and requires a willingness to work at depth both in and beyond class sessions. Relates to SKSM Thresholds 3, 5, 6, 7 & and MFC Comp 3. This course is high-residence only. [ECO preferred but not required; 15 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

MENTOR YEAR PROJECT II (IDS-3261)

Credits:3

Second half of a year-long course required for ABSW MDiv students. During the spring semester and with the guidance of a mentor, students implement the ministerial project they designed in the fall semester and also submit a 30-40 page project report.

HUMANIZING ECONOMICS (IDS-4203)

Credits:3

In this class, we will gain facility with economic theory in order to engage and deconstruct it in service of spiritual grounding, personal liberation, and social change. Despite the illusion of disembodied objectivity presented by mainstream academics, economics is fundamentally interactive. To that end, we will complement discussions about contemporary economic thought with image theater, forum theater, and other rituals to demechanize our habitual relations with money. All participants will collaborate to create a supportive and safe environment for receiving and transforming individual stories of scarcity, greed, exploitation, indebtedness, gratitude, abundance, forgiveness, renunciation, sacrifice, generosity, and other relevant experiences. The class is designed for people who have avoided economics classes and terminology out of aversion or fear and those who are familiar with the concepts and have found them inadequate or spiritually harmful. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

SKSM SYMPOSIUM (IDS-4205)

Credits:0.5

Starr King’s 7th Annual Symposium, will be held January 12th, 2019. • This urban retreat is an annual gathering of our entire student body, faculty, staff and trustees for two days of learning, ritual, celebration, food, music, community-building and service. • This 2019 Symposium is convened by Dean Gabriella Lettini in collaboration with other SKSM faculty and community leaders. Starr King students are requested to enroll. • Participation in 2 symposia is required for all degree students. 0.5 units of credit will be given to students who are currently enrolled in a degree program. • Students please note: This is a two (2) step process: (1) Enroll for the Symposium as a course through Populi to ensure course credit (see How to Register for a Starr King Course); AND (2) Complete a separate online registration form on the SKSM Symposium website (www.sksmsymposium.org) for event needs (including reg. type, dietary & special needs). • In order to obtain credit, students must read all required readings before Symposium, SIGN the attendance roster for each event, and be active in large and small group discussions. Students please go to the SKSM Symposium website (www.sksmsymposium.org) under Symposium Leaders tab and select “Recommended Reading” section on that website to see what reading is required before Symposium. • In addition, students are asked to work at least ONE work shift before or during Symposium. Making certain that you are signed in is the student’s responsibility. • Everyone is required to complete the separate online Registration Form on the SKSM Symposium (www.sksmsymposium.org) website, so we can prepare for your presence and address any special needs. For further information, please contact Shannon Eizenga, Coordinator of Academic Programs (seizenga@sksm.edu) and Chris Schelin, Dean of Students, (cschelin@sksm.edu) [200 max enrollment]

ART OF ACADEMIC WRITING (IDS-8100)

Credits:1.5

This intensive course is designed to orient students to the primary types of academic writing generally assigned at PSR and the Graduate Theological Union (GTU), including reflection papers, research papers, critical essays, and exegetical papers. The course is intended to help students learn or ^dust off^ the writing skills they will need to succeed academically while in seminary. Through lectures, online discussions, written exercises, reading assignments, and one-on-one check-ins with the instructor, participants will learn the art and technique of composing critical writing in a U.S. academic setting. Among other topics, this course will cover: developing a topic; identifying reliable resources; reading and note-taking; constructing a thesis; writing and revising the outline, body, introduction, and conclusion of a paper; and formatting footnotes and bibliography. Participants will also learn how to identify and use online resources available through the GTU library. Finally, the course will introduce PSR's Plagiarism Policy and will offer strategies for avoiding plagiarism in a U.S. context. Please note: This is an intensive course. We will be covering seven weeks of material in just three weeks. Successful learning in this course will require a significant daily time commitment-up to three hours some days-from participants. This ONLINE course meets asynchronously using Moodle (http://gtu.edu/library/students/moodle-help). High-speed internet connection required.