Course Information

 

for Liturgical Studies Department


LIVING WORSHIP (LS-1012)

Credits:2

This two-semester collaboratory course is designed through both classroom work and lab work to explore the histories and theologies of Lutheran worship, including its global expressions; to articulate a theology of baptism and communion; to prepare worship for weekly PLTS chapel services; to work with members of the pastoral care class to prepare services for life passages; and to embody postures, gestures and rubrics to find and develop their own styles of worship leadership. Evaluation will be based on participation, worship preparation, and written assignments.

FUNDAMENTALS OF WORSHIP (LS-1110)

Credits:3

This is a practical course for MDiv students to begin their preparation for leadership in liturgical worship. The course will walk students through the eucharistic liturgy from the perspective of different liturgical roles, attending to issues in public speaking, ritual movement, issues in liturgical music, knowledge of musical choices and comprehension of the shape of liturgy. Active participation in the class and preparation for the enacted elements constitute the basis for evaluation. Summer section meets 6/16/14-6/27/14, from 10:00-11:45am, at CDSP Chapel. [PIN code required; 20 max enrollment]

QUEERING LITURGY AND MUSIC (LS-3140)

Credits:1.5

The past forty years has seen the creation of liturgical and musical materials created specifically for LGBT settings, or adapted by GLBT churches, which examine the implication of GLBT identity when it comes to worship, ritual and secular and religious music used in these settings. This course is an interdisciplinary approach (liberation theologies, history, queer studies, pastoral care, ritual studies, music history and performance to name a few) and will consider a wide variety of texts and resources for use in designing worship and sacramental rites (communion, baptism, weddings, funerals, naming ceremonies, healing services, coming out rites) for GLBT congregations, GLBT gatherings, and settings in which GLBT people or issues are included in a larger group. Students will read critical texts, visit exemplary settings, and design sermons and liturgies for GLBT specific and GLBT inclusive settings. The week will include voluntary field visits to City of Refuge UCC, First UU of Kensington, MCC San Francisco, First Congregational Church of Berkeley, New Spirit Community Church in Berkeley, Congregation Beth El and Congregation Sha'ar Zahav, Glide Memorial Church, St. Gregory Episcopal Church, the Dignity Mass in San Francisco and others yet to be identified. Class meets daily, 7/20/09-7/24/09, from 1:00pm-5:00pm, in PSR 6 and PSR CHPL. NOTE: This course has special registration procedures and fees. See www.psr.edu/summer.

WOMNST/MUJERSTA/FMNST LITURGY (LS-4002)

Credits:1.5

WOMANIST/MUJERISTA/FEMINIST LITURGIES FOR TRANSFORMING CHURCHES It's time for women to create more new art, music, and liturgies that will transform our churches! Effective worship is crucial to social transformation, and participants will use their experiences of multiple cultural forms, their particular talents, and the ideas of womanist/mujerista/feminist thinkers and researchers to create new liturgical resources for church life. These resources will reflect the liberative work of diverse women and men, with attention to different generations--including music, prayers, poems, visual arts, litanies, and sermon ideas, as well as being informed by the history, context, and theologies of diverse early Christian spiritual practices based in life-affirming, this-worldly, communitarian ideas. With opportunities to work individually and in groups, the seminar will create liturgical resources that offer transformation of Christian worship beyond traditional forms. Special attention will be given to how differences in race, age, class, sexuality, ethnicity, abilities, and gender inform theology and biblical interpretation and inspire creativity -- particularly in the spheres of new art forms and rituals. In creating resources for worship, the seminar will focus on the lectionary texts for Lent 2016. Participants will be able to discuss insights and offer creative work at an open forum that the class will offer to the community and make them available online. Course meets daily, 7/6/15-7/10/15 from 1:30pm-5:30pm, at PSR Chapel and MUDD 100. NOTE: For registration & summer session policies, see www.psr.edu/summer.

MISSIONAL LITURGY (LS-8100)

Credits:3

This online course will address the relationship between social justice, ethical Christian formation, liturgical spirituality, and worship. Worship can happen anytime, anywhere. This course will examine missional implications of Sunday morning worship, but it will also explore emergent worship, worship at the margins, and the creation of worship spaces that are spaces of ^eruption^ where God's transformative spirit is invited to erupt in the midst of oppressive circumstances. This course is intended for MDiv, MCL, and MA students. The course will require weekly written responses, Online collaborative engagement, and a final project of the student's design.

MISSIONAL WORSHIP (LSCE-8250)

Credits:3

This online course will address the relationships between social justice, ethical Christian formation, liturgical spirituality, and worship. Worship can happen anytime, anywhere. This course examines missional implications of Sunday morning worship, but also explores emergent worship at the margins, and the creation of worship spaces of "eruption" -where God's transformational spirit erupts in the midst of oppressive circumstances. Through this course students will: (1) engage and develop multiple models for missional liturgical worship as it relates to issues of social justice and cultural change; (2) gain experience in identifying and participating in worship contexts beyond the local sanctuary with a focus on social justice; (3) develop a theological and practical understanding of what it means to be a church engaged in missional worship; and (4) develop skills for liturgical improvisation, the development of guerilla liturgies in the moment, as well as planned liturgies in uncommon spaces. This course is intended for MDiv, MCL, and MA students. The course will require weekly written responses, online collaborative engagement via Moodle, and a final project of the student's design. [PIN code required; auditors excluded] Note: This course is co-taught by PhD students George Tripp Hudgins and Khalia Jelks Williams with Newhall Awards with Dr. Jennifer Davidson.

Practicing Faith in Postmodern (LSFT-2140)

Credits:3

This seminar and practicum on worship explores the vital intersections of theory and practice, faith and life, theology and liturgy in the context of postmodernity. We will begin by gaining an understanding of contemporary religious environments through attention to theories and theologies of postmodernity, and to concrete worship practices in a variety of communities. Then we will study the strategies of contemporary movements in worship that address postmodern culture, including multi-sensory liturgies, the alternative worship movement, and emerging churches. Each class session will include practicum time where students will perform different elements of worship, from reading scripture, to leading communion, to introducing a time of prayer, etc. and receive feedback on their enactments. This combination of study, discussion, practice, and reflection is aimed at preparing worship leaders to create, plan and lead worship at the leading-edges of contemporary Christianity.

CHAPEL WORSHIP DESIGN PLANNING (LSFT-2141)

Credits:1.5

PLANNING AND CRAFTING CHAPEL WORSHIP This practicum course consists of working as a team to design, plan, and carry out worship for weekly chapel and other occasional services at the Pacific School of Religion. Students will gain experience with planning and carrying out worship in a variety of styles through a small group process. We will explore the nuts and bolts of designing meaningful, multisensory, and creative worship while reflecting on the historical, cultural, theological, embodied, and practical aspects that shape the experience of worship in contemporary communities of faith. Evaluation is based on attendance, participation, evaluation of chapel services, curation of chapel service(s) and a final critical reflection paper. It is geared toward MDiv. students, but all are welcome. Course meeting times coincide with Chapel Planning Committee Meetings on Mondays from 5:15-6:30pm in the small dining room of D'Autremont Hall, and with Chapel services on Tuesdays from 10am-12pm in the PSR Chapel. 3-4 other discussion sessions will be arranged in consultation with the professor and other students. [Auditors with faculty permission]

WORSHIP,THE ARTS & LIBERATION (LSFT-2142)

Credits:3

Description forthcoming.

WORSHIP PLANNING & LEADING (LSFT-2160)

Credits:1.5

Every Monday evening at ABSW the community comes together to begin the week with worship. This is a multicultural, multiethnic, multigenerational, multi-traditional, creative event. In this course students will gain hands-on, practical experience in designing and participating in the worship experiences at ABSW. Students will gain experience in planning worship as a team, participating in weekly chapel services, and evaluating worship through ritual criticism. Students can participate in each term throughout the year, but are not required to do so. Attendance at weekly chapel (M 6:00pm-6:40pm, plus time to set up and/or break down the chapel space) is required in addition to regular class meeting time. Course meets on W, 4:30-6:30. Students are only eligible to take this class a maximum of two times for credit. Pass/Fail only. [12 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

THEOLOGY OF PREACHING (LSHM-4500)

Credits:3

This course explores the theology of preaching in the Christian tradition and investigates the ways that different theological perspectives intersect with the preaching event. It gives primary place and focus to preaching as a liturgical event and seeks to integrate Word and Sacrament as a unitive proclamation of God's saving acts in Jesus. In addition, the relationship between shared literary texts and the community's reception, the cultural and social contexts of communities (their ^social location^), and the role of the preacher as ^one who proclaims^ in the name of Christ and the Church will help shape our discussion. The course welcomes ecumenical perspectives. Opportunities for shared preparation (lectionary based) and actual preaching integrate the practical ministry of the preacher with the theological investigation. [Faculty Consent required; 12 max enrollment]

EASTERN CHRISTIAN LITURGIES (LSHS-4675)

Credits:3

This course will introduce students to the fundamental elements of Eastern Christian worship. The survey will treat the distinct spirit of Eastern worship, the origins and development of the 7 extant eastern rites, and the physical setting and objects used by these traditions. The course will deal in detail with the most widely used eastern service, the Byzantine eucharistic liturgy. The course will combine lecture and seminar discussion. Evaluation will be based on two in-class presentation and two written assignments.

INTRODUCTION TO WORSHIP (LSHS-8100)

Credits:3

MUSIC/WORSHIP IN 21ST CENTURY (LSRA-2740)

Credits:3

The course investigates the interaction of culture, liturgy, and congregational singing with the goal of enabling participants to develop the tools necessary to navigate the complexities of liturgical studies and musical practice in contemporary contexts. Through lectures and discussions, the course will offer theoretical, theological, and liturgical perspectives on important themes such as music and social justice, global music and inculturation, and singing and Christian identity, as well as help participants develop strategies for incorporating these perspectives in the performance of worship. Evaluation will be based on participation, short written assignments, presentations, and final project. [20 max enrollment] This course is co- taught by PhD student Alicia Dean with a Newhall Award.

MUSIC IN LITURGY: EAST & WEST (LSRA-4130)

Credits:3

This course will analyze the place and significance of music in the liturgical traditions of the Christian East and West. After a brief introduction to the history of music in Christian Worship, students will focus on liturgical music in particular traditions (e.g., Byzantine, Armenian, Roman Catholic, Anglican, Lutheran, etc) with particular emphasis on scriptural commentary, theological expression, and ritual function. Evaluation will be based on weekly Moodle postings, participation in classroom discussion; leadership of one class session, and a final paper. [PIN code required] Note: This course is co-taught by Phd student Carl Bear with a Newhall Award with Dr. John Klentos and Dr. Lizette Larson-Miller.

LIFE CYCLES IN LITURGY & ART (LSRA-4230)

Credits:3

This course will consider how various stages of human life from birth to death are represented in the liturgical texts and visual arts of the Orthodox church. Format will be primarily discussion, with occasional lectures. Students will learn to read and interpret visual arts and poetic texts as a way into understanding how people have understood their place within the matrix of nature, their particular culture, and faith. Specific topics will include Birth, Baptism, Marriage, Monastic Life, Illness and Healing, Death, and Burial. The students will write a research paper and give an illustrated oral presentation. The course is intended for advanced MDiv, MA, MTS, and PhD students.

RITUAL/TRAUMA/SOCIAL CHANGE (LSRS-2000)

Credits:1.5

In many movements for social change, trauma plays an important, if unacknowledged, role. Social, cultural, and personal trauma in particular can serve to motivate individual activism, provide both tools and constraints for activism, and construct narratives and frames of injustice or reconciliation that can sustain and shape activism on a large scale. What is more, those who work for social change often experience trauma in the process of their work. This seminar explores the connections between movements for social change and the dynamics of social and personal trauma. We will consider the role that ritual can and does play in uncovering and addressing trauma by drawing suffering into the process of reconstructing memory, giving expression to that which has been silenced, offering frames for making meaning, and embodying visions of transformation. Evaluation will be based on leadership of discussions, critical reflection papers, observation, and ritual design/analysis. Course meets weekdays, 6/12/17- 6/16/17, from 1pm-5pm at MUDD 102.

WORSHIP IN TROUBLED TIMES (LSRS-3500)

Credits:1.5

Public worship is one of the primary collective acts of faith communities. As such, worship offers crucial opportunities for communities to grapple with the pressing social issues, struggles for justice, and conflicts of our time. This course explores the ways in which worship can serve our communities when the times are troubled. How can we creatively engage in truth-telling, justice-making and lament through ritual, prayer, word and song? What strategies for worship can offer hope and resilience in times of social unrest and struggle? What resources does our worship offer for resisting racism, classism, patriarchy, heterosexism, colonialism, etc. in their particularities and their intersections? How do we create worship services that address important issues, hold the complexities of those concerns, and generate imaginative possibilities for transformation? Through reading, discussion, case studies and worship planning and design, we will discover ways to worship that help us to live and lead as spiritually and theologically rooted people of faith in unsettled and unsettling times. Course meets weekdays 6/5/17-6/9/17, from 5pm- 9pm at MUDD 102.

WOMEN, SPIRITUALITY, & WORSHIP (LSSP-4364)

Credits:3

This seminar will explore contemporary women's engagement in worship across three interrelated arenas: 1)official liturgical/sacramental practice; 2)women-identified liturgical communities; 3)domestic rites and popular religious practice--with special attention to how women's spirituality shapes this engagement. Issues of language, leadership, space, women's bodies, images of God, symbols, and reordered relationships will be explored. Readings will draw on feminist, womanist, mujerista and Asian/African ^women church^ perspectives. The course will open with a brief look at the biblical and historical precedents for women's engagement/leadership in worship, and the role of gender analysis in re-imagining Christian liturgical history. Students will develop research papers or annotated bibliographies related to their specific interests and will prepare ritual prayer that will be included in each class. [PIN code required; 12 max enrollment]

THEO IN POETRY: HYMNOLOGY (LSST-2520)

Credits:3

This course will study the expression of theology in and through hymnology, particularly of the Byzantine tradition. How does the medium affect the message when poetry rather than philosophical discourse is used to communicate theological ideas? How are people's spiritual lives affected when the Church's teaching is communicated by hymns passed on in the home rather than through clergy's speaking?

PRAYER & PUBLIC WORSHIP: (LSST-2588)

Credits:3

This course will explore the different forms of prayer in worship and how they bring us into deeper intimacy with God. Particular emphasis is given to: theologies of prayer; historical perspectives on prayer in worship; the relationships between personal prayer and public prayer; and different genres of prayer in worship, including intercessions or Joys and Concerns. Format: Lecture and class discussion. Evaluation: Participation, readings, prayers, and final project.

ECOLOGY AND LITURGY (LSST-4015)

Credits:3

This seminar explores the vital connection between human concern for the Earth and its creatures, and worship of the living God. Readings and discussion will focus on scientific, liturgical and theological writings from a broad range of authors that illuminate the convergence of ecology and worship, and that propose a path toward deeper ethical and liturgical response to the global ecological crises that mark our times. Special attention will be given to perspectives of Ignatian spirituality and mission. Students will develop research papers or annotated bibliographies related to their specific interests. (MDiv, MA, MTS, DMin) [Faculty Consent required; 15 max enrollment]

DEVLPMNT OF EUCHARISTIC THLGY (LSST-4341)

Credits:3

Beginning with the New Testament evidence, this seminar will consider the historical developments in Eucharistic doctrine. Particular attention will be given to the theory of transubstantiation, Eucharistic disputes at the Reformation, ending with current perspectives in Eucharistic doctrine. Evaluation: organize & chair one class session; participate in discussion of weekly readings; final paper. Intended audience: MDiv with MA & PhD invited with more substantial final paper required. This course is co-taught by PhD student Stephen Shaver with a Newhall Award. [Introductory liturgy course; 10 max enrollment; PIN code required; Auditors with Faculty permission]

PERFORMING THE BODY (LSST-4400)

Credits:3

PERFORMING THE BODY: SEX, GENDER AND DESIRE IN WORSHIP AND RITUAL This course investigates the ways in which the practices of worship and ritual both shape and are shaped by the complex intersections that are bodies. We will reflect critically on how womanist, feminist, postcolonial and queer theories and theologies impact how spiritual practices are both performed and understood, with a focus on how these performances construct human bodies, the communal body of practitioners, and notions of embodiment. Students will leave the course with analytical and practical tools for reading and crafting worship materials in their own contexts which take account of bodies, gender, sexuality, and desire as categories of analysis and praxis. Evaluations will be based on attendance, preparation, reflection papers and worship design and a final synthesis project. MDiv, MA/MTS, DMin and PhD/ThD students are welcome. [Auditors with faculty permission]