Course Information

 

for Religion and Practice Department


INTRO TO PASTORAL COUNSELING (PS-1001)

Credits:3

Basic introduction to concepts and practices of pastoral care/ counseling. Through class discussions and readings, students will learn active and reflective listening skills, crisis intervention, when and how to refer, maintaining confidentiality, and boundary issues. Topics to be discussed will include: power issues, professional ethics, transference and countertransference, depression, marital/ relationship issues, post traumatic stress, childhood and adolescent issues, dying and grieving, loss, etc. Consideration will also be given to the importance of multi- cultural sensitivity. Format: lecture/discussion; evaluation: reflection papers, final paper. [15 max enrollment]

MINISTRY OF PASTORAL CARE (PS-1005)

Credits:3

This course is a basic orientation to the pastorcal care and counseling tasks of ministry. We shall explore and examine a variety of relevant and significant issues in the theology and practice of pastoral care and counseling.

INTRO TO PASTORAL CARE (PS-1006)

Credits:3

This course aims to introduce students to the history, practice, and theology of pastoral care in Christian traditions. Students will use most of the class time to discuss readings and engage in the analysis of case studies in small groups, though the instructor will give short lectures to present background information supplemental to the readings for each week. The course assumes no prior knowledge or experience in pastoral care. The course will place special emphasis on pastoral care in diverse contexts, for and by people of color, LGBTQ persons, and other underrepresented groups, in order to prepare students for a wide array of possible settings for pastoral care, and students will be encouraged to think critically about categories such as race, gender, and sexual orientation.

PRACTICE CARE COMNTY OF FAITH (PS-1008)

Credits:3

PRACTICING CARE IN COMMUNITIES OF FAITH This is an introductory course in practices of care for ministry in communities of faith. While the primary focus of the course is the local congregation the materials will speak to other settings as well. The working assumption for this course is that care involves the whole community of faith as it is called to co-create, nurture and protect the wellbeing of all people. Throughout the course pastoral and prophetic points of view will be held together as we explore the needs and situations facing people in diverse settings. Walter Brueggemann says, ^There are no personal issues that are not of a piece with the great public issues. To divide things up into prophetic and pastoral is to betray both.^ This means that as pastoral theology reunites with its prophetic legacy practices of care will engage people within the cross currents of public life. This course is the PSR MDiv requirement for Pastoral Care and replaces PS 1060.

INTRODUCTION TO PASTORAL CARE (PS-1009)

Credits:3

The purpose of this course is to grow in self-understanding as helping persons to understand the context for situations of care, to learn an approach to pastoral care that can serve as a framework for working with people in a variety of crisis situations, to foster empathetic ways of listening and responding and to develop skills of self-criticism about our pastoral care work. These aims will be developed through assigned readings, class lecture and discussions, and role playing practice in small groups. [30 max enrollment]

INTRO PSTRL CARE & COUNSELING (PS-1013)

Credits:3

In this course we will explore and practice basic areas of pastoral care and counseling for parish ministry: supportive, crisis, and bereavement counseling, spiritual care and direction, marriage and family counseling, referral counseling, group work, and pastoral psychotherapy. Students will be introduced to basic resources of the field as well as alternative voices. No prerequisites.

PASTORAL CARE AND COUNSELING (PS-1015)

Credits:3

This is an introductory course in the important ministry of pastoral care and counseling. It is designed to introduce the MDiv student to the basic concepts, dynamics, issues and skills necessary for effective pastoral care. This course will teach both theory and the skills of pastoral care. The course will include lectures and skill practice in small groups. Course requirements include regular attendance, personal reflection papers, quizzes, and a final case study. [20 max enrollment]

ANGELS FEAR (PS-1022)

Credits:3

At the end of this course the students of pastoral care will be able to: 1)engage theological thinking and contextual awareness about pastoral care situations, and appreciate the role of tradition, music and arts, and nature in creating pastoral care interventions; 2)distinguish first, second and third order theological reflection in particular pastoral care contexts; 3)distinguish the roles of practical theology, pastoral care, and pastoral counseling in the helping process; 4)use a systemic model for pastoral care to adapt to their own situation; 5)use a method or model for diagnostic purposes, assess pastoral care situations in-order-to communicate intelligently with other health care professionals; 6)apply key concepts in systemic thinking (metaphor, reflexivity, social-psychological and bio-medical science information) and discern the relevance of systemic thinking for ministry; 7)utilize Pastoral care journals, systemic thinkers and major texts in the field of pastoral care; 8)distinguish linear from systemic thinking in a competent practice of pastoral care.

PASTORAL CARE & CONGREGATIONS (PS-1060)

Credits:3

This survey course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of pastoral care, including its history, literature, theories and practices. Students will explore pastoral theology and pastoral care practice as essential components within Christian and other faith traditions and parish ministry. In this respect, students will further explore the nature of holistic care for individuals and families within faith and social communities. Through film, lectures, texts/readings and class discussions, this course will consider pastoral care and counseling principles and approaches and their relationship to common issues and concerns, e.g., worship and spiritual needs, marriage and family, sexuality, boundaries, illness, loss, grief, death and dying. In light of the fact that students find the role plays very helpful in their formation as pastoral care providers, this class will be taught twice each week; one class is devoted to lecture and the other class is a lab structure for modules (role plays). [20 max enrollment]

PSYCHOLOGY OF FLOURISHING (PS-1366)

Credits:1.5

PSYCHOLOGY OF FLOURISHING: EXPLORING SPIRITUAL GROWTH IN COMMUNITY Informed by the fields of positive psychology and Christian spiritual formation, this course will examine the possibility of cultivating our lives of faith and community in a culture that pushes us to live shallowly and relate to other people superficially. We will look at recent writing on flourishing (including Susan Phillips's ^The Cultivated Life: From Ceaseless Striving to Receiving Joy^) and moral community (including Jonathan Haidt's ^The Happiness Hypothesis^). Practices of personal and communal development will be taught in an environment of mutual interest and respect for individual differences. We anticipate a lively and diverse mix of class participants, and the class is open to all. Evaluation will be based on a self-analysis paper (3000-4000 words) of one's spiritual and moral foundations and practices, integrating texts, classroom discussions, and more. Course will meet on two Saturdays (3/10/2018 & 3/17/2018), from 9:00am-6:00pm.

INTRO TO JUNGIAN THOUGHT (PS-1505)

Credits:3

We will discuss Jung's contributions to psychology and philosophy in the context of their applicability to clinical work, their relevance to religion and spirituality, their relevance to work in the context of the church, the community, and to human suffering. Evaluation will be by class discussion based on lectures and student reflection papers and by mid-terms and final papers. [12 max enrollment]

LIVING WITH DYING (PS-1615)

Credits:1.5

Death is inevitable. Pastoral caregivers, in a variety of settings, will encounter death and dying. Advances in treatment and technology have transformed the trajectory of many terminal illnesses. A growing number of people with terminal illnesses are living longer than ever before, often transforming terminal illness into chronic illness. HIV/AIDS, cancer, COPD, end stage diabetes and renal failure may take years, if not decades, before a person dies. Pastoral care may involve long relationships with the dying, relationships which include hospital visitations, support during outpatient treatments and collaboration with hospice caregivers and other members of the treatment team. Pastoral care for the dying involves the diagnosed individual, families and other loved ones. The purpose of this course is to develop pastoral caregivers' culture and gender awareness, understanding and competencies in creating environments to relieve suffering for individuals and families in a wide variety of settings. The course is based on the premise that meaning and transcendence at the end of life are best achieved and understood through the interpersonal use of narrative techniques to facilitate communication. This course is strongly recommended for pastoral caregivers who have not had personal and professional experiences with dying, as well as those seeking deeper understanding. Class meets daily, 7/22/13- 7/26/13, from 1:30pm-5:30pm at PSR.

INTRO TO HEALTHCARE CHAPLAINCY (PS-1815)

Credits:1.5

This course is co-taught by Peter Yuichi Clark and Thomas Harshman. This course seeks to orient students to spiritual care with persons in crisis within healthcare settings, such as hospitals, outpatient clinics, hospices, and home health agencies. Students will practice basic pastoral skills (e.g., listening/attending/responding, assessment, etc.) and gain an understanding of topics including the clinical action-reflection method of learning, biomedical ethics issues, the chaplain's role in acute situations, and the dynamics of healthcare institutions. The course is designed to be most helpful for persons anticipating their first unit of Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) within the next year, but it also should be useful for people who anticipate that visitation in healthcare settings will be part of their future vocations. Course format includes discussions, lectures, and simulated pastoral encounters. Evaluation will be based on class participation and five reflection papers. Course meets daily, 1/28/19-02/01/19, from 6:10pm-9:45pm at ABSW. [25 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

DIALOGUE/RELIGION & PSYCHOLOGY (PS-2055)

Credits:3

The course is designed to explore the nature of and possibilities for dialogue between religion and psychology, with a special focus on depth psychology. An examination of the current history of dialogue between theology and psychology will be followed by an investigation of the challenges to both psychology and theology by feminist theory. Exploration of the ^religious interest^ will be a major focus of the course. [Basic theology course;max enrollment 10;written permission of instructor required;auditors excluded]

C/PC CRITICAL THEOL REFLECTION (PS-2058)

Credits:1.5

Critical Theological Reflection will use the "teaching case" method. The purpose of the "teaching case" is to establish a framework for discussion among students. This method is used to increase student's knowledge and assist student's integration of individual, group, organizational, social, political, spiritual, physical, psychological, and theological dynamics in pastoral care-giving contexts. The "teaching case" method allows students to reflect upon data collected from pastoral care encounters. The learning process includes a recollected reconstruction of the interchange between the student as care-provider and a care-seeker, as well as a structured reflection upon that interchange. This approach is used for clarification of pastoral care encounters, greater self-understanding as religious leader and person, shared learning among class participants; as well as increased pastoral competence and care-giving skills, contextualization of caring encounters, and theological reflection upon human situations. It is also an opportunity for students to develop consultation skills for providing critical theological feedback, and bridge the gap between theological reflection and pastoral care practice. Learning strategies include writing case studies, written and oral reflection in response to a series of questions (done outside class time), small group sharing, reading, and reflection papers. Participants must commit themselves to the weekly class and to the critical reflective process in order to receive credit. Priority to SFTS M.Div. C/PC Concentration students; SFTS M.Div. and GTU students admitted on a space available basis. [12 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

MINISTRY AND MENTAL HEALTH (PS-2108)

Credits:1.5

In the United States, it is reported that persons who are facing mental illnesses consult a clergyperson for help more often than any other profession. To help prepare themselves for these careseeking encounters, students will learn about commonly diagnosed mental illnesses (e.g., depression, borderline personality, schizophrenia, bipolar), explore their own personal/cultural/familial awarenesses about mental health and illness, engage in theological reflection on illness and healing, and practice strategies for offering spiritual care with persons dealing with mental disorders. Course format includes discussions, lectures, simulated pastoral encounters, films, and student presentations. Evaluation will be based on class participation, reflection papers, and a case study. [20 max enrollment] Class meets daily, 7/25/16-7/29/16, from 6:10pm-9:45pm at ABSW.

JEWISH PERSP ON SUFFERING&LIFE (PS-2126)

Credits:3

This course will explore the intersection between the experience of suffering and the search for personal meaning through a variety of Jewish pastoral perspectives. We will begin our course by exploring what a Jewish pastoral framework might look like and why it is a valuable approach in the study of Jewish text and life. Each week will focus on different views on the nature of suffering and life meaning from the relational to the communal to the liturgical. This course will expose you to selections from the Hebrew Bible and Talmudic tales that explore the main themes of the course. We will encounter the writings of Viktor Frankl, Martin Buber, the Warsaw Ghetto Rabbi (Rabbi Kalonymus Kalman Shapira), Rabbi Alan Lew, and other Jewish thinkers. This course will be geared towards students who will be applying the knowledge gained in academic and/or ministry settings.

PASTORAL CARE & COUNSELING: (PS-2402)

Credits:3

YESTERDAY AND TODAY This course interrogates the traditional understanding of pastoral care and counseling, reconciling, sustaining, nurturing and empowering, and various models of care. Care is almost reduced to pastoral counseling which is being influenced by humanistic theories, predominantly by Rogerian client-centered therapy and all that therapy and all that is borrowed from psychoanalysis, Gestalt and Rational Emotive therapies and various theories. In all its positive influence the hard core is that such care is dealing with intra- psychic and interpersonal relationship.

ADDICTIONS, 12-STEPS & CHURCH (PS-2492)

Credits:1.5

A broad study of addictive patterns, how they grow out of family systems, and how they affect the Church. Also, a theological exploration of 12-Step spirituality. Discussion/lecture/ attendance at recovery meetings. A response paper and book review of about 10 pages (total) is expected of credit students. Auditors expected to participate in class projects, assignments and discussion. Past students have consistently commended this course for both practical knowledge and personal growth. Students taking the class for credit must take it pass/fail. Intended audience: MDiv. Class meets daily, 1/13/14-1/17/14, from 9:00am-1:00pm, in CDSP 225.

PSTRL CARE IN ANGER & CONFLICT (PS-2862)

Credits:1.5

For spiritual caregivers, anger--both within ourselves and encountered in those for whom we are caring--is often misunderstood, and anger and conflict frequently create an apparent impasse in ministry. To address this situation, students in this course will learn about the physiology of emotions (specifically anger), explore their own personal/cultural/familial awareness of anger, engage a theology of anger and conflict, and practice strategies for offering spiritual care with angry persons and/or in conflictual interactions. Course format includes discussions, lectures, simulated pastoral encounters, films, and student presentations. Evaluation will be based on class participation, reflection papers, and a case study. Class meets daily, 7/24/17-7/28/17, from 6:10pm-9:45pm, at ABSW. [20 max enrollment]

HISTORICAL/COLLECTIVE TRAUMA (PS-3014)

Credits:1.5

HISTORICAL & COLLECTIVE TRAUMA: AFFECT, GRIEF & LOSS Affect, most simply put, is the experience of feeling or emotion. This course will examine the affective landscape and afterlife of collective trauma. The emergence of Trauma Studies, while not new, actually saw its proliferation after September 11, 2001 particularly in the U.S. We will conduct a preliminary examination on the study of affect and 'affective remainder' such as grief, loss, mourning and melancholia that while not presuming any kind of full 'recovery' from collective and historical trauma, might open ways for transformation. We will attempt to answer the question of 'what are affects?' and 'what might be political, social, cultural and religious work of affects?' Course meets daily, 7/13/15-7/17/15, from 1:30pm-5:30pm, at MUDD 206. NOTE: For registration & summer session policies, see www.psr.edu/summer.

CHANGING PATTERNS OF FAMILY: (PS-3045)

Credits:3

HEALING OF RELATIONSHIPS The concern of this course is to promote a paradigm shift in marriage and family counseling from dealing exclusively with intra psychic and interpersonal problems to address the larger macro systems which affect the family. This also means that any family counseling done from a perspective of a therapy, or even taking an integrated approach is in a sense: limited and reductionistic. The need is for a multidisciplinary approach using other disciplines such as the psychological, sociological, political, economical, ethical, spiritual, and theological frameworks to deal with issues and potentially to invite other specialists into counseling sessions or to consult with other specialists. In order to achieve this concern a twofold method is suggested. The course starts with what is available and reflects critically on the intervention and prevention methods of the existing therapies and moves onto explore the other models of care offered by other communities.

COUNSELING TECHNIQUES/PROCESS (PS-4005)

Credits:3

Course focus is on counseling/facilitation techniques and processes that will equip religious leaders to encourage transformational change for individuals and groups within the context of our current global unraveling/revolution. Numerous theories and practices of individual and group change will form the base of our work: Person-centered, Eco-psychology, Feminist approaches, Co-counseling, Work That Reconnects, Trauma Chaplaincy--all grounded in anti-oppressive commitment. Readings on these theories/practices as well as on the multiple dimensions of global unraveling/revolution will form the textual base supporting our praxis. [14 max enrollment; PIN code required; Auditors excluded]

THANK YOU FOR SHARING: (PS-4032)

Credits:3

We'll look at the origins of the twelve steps in the Oxford Groups of the 1920's and their emphasis on replicating first-century Christianity. We'll also study the first formal twelve step program, Alcoholics Anonymous, from its founding in 1935 through its remarkable growth to the present. Finally, we'll see how the steps are worked today, and what larger significance they may hold. We'll try to understand why some church basements are fuller during the week with twelve step meetings than the sanctuary is on Sunday morning with the customary worship. Personal experience with the steps is welcome but not necessary. [12 max enrollment/ Sig. on Reg. Card]

MEANING IN DREAMS & DREAMING (PS-4200)

Credits:3

^Dreams are the touchstone of our character.^ - Henry David Thoreau. ^The dreamer and his dream are the same. The powers personified in the dream are those that move the world.^ - Joseph Campbell. ^In dreams, we catch a glimpse of a life larger than our own.^ - Helen Keller. All creatures dream (with the possible exception of echidna, the spiny anteater of Australia.) Each dream comes in the service of health and wholeness and points to the reconciliation of each with all. The symbolic, metaphoric language of dreams can be more consciously understood and appreciated by anyone, since it is already unconsciously grasped by all. This is an open enrollment, introductory class. Much of the semester will be spent in small groups (of no more than eight people) led in rotation by the instructor and those who have previously studied dream work with the instructor and are currently under his supervision. [Auditors exluded]

INTRO DREAMWORK DRM GRP LDRSHP (PS-4201)

Credits:3

^History is a nightmare from which we are struggling to awake.^ - James Joyce; ^Begin with the dream and work outward^ - Anais Nin; ^The dreaming spirits love you.^ - indigenous Senoi wisdom. The sacred narratives and religious traditions of the world are in startling unanimity in their declarations that human beings are in closer and more direct communion with the Divine in our dreams than in any ordinary state of consciousness. The language and structure of dreaming is universal and archetypal. Anyone can learn to understand this symbolic language more consciously, with a modicum of effort and focused attention. This is an introductory class. Emphasis is placed on both the experiential process of working with dreams in a shared group setting, as well as on acquiring the skills and sensitivities necessary for leading and facilitating this process for others. For those who are interested, an opportunity to develop skills in this area, leading small groups under regular supervision, will be offered in the Spring class, ^Meaning in Dreams and Dreaming.^ [20 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

SWDNBRG & SPIRITUAL PSYCHOLOGY (PS-4325)

Credits:3

Swedenborg was a pioneer of spiritual psychology, meaning the project of understanding the health and sickness of the soul in terms of a Christian view of the cosmos, morality, and the great drama of fall and redemption. First, we will look at a range of his writings. Second, we will look at his influence on three spiritual psychologists: Blake, Jung, and Wilson Van Dusen. Third, we will explore the application of his ideas to concrete examples in the pastoral context. Ten 1-2 page discussion papers, plus final paper or exam.

ILLNESS, HEALTH & HEALING (PS-8400)

Credits:3

Illness is both soul-shaking and soul-evoking for the patient and for all others for whom the patient matters. We lose an innocence, we know vulnerability, we are no longer who we were before this event, and we will never be the same. We are in uncharted terrain, and there is no turning back. Illness is a profound soul event, and yet this is virtually ignored and unaddressed. - Jean Shinoda Bolen, Close to the Bone Illness, Health & Healing is a two-semester on-line course in which students (1) listen deeply to the voices of the ill and their caregivers; (2) explore ways of fostering health and healing in their congregations and communities; and (3) develop practices to aid in their own healing and well-being. During the Spring of 2015 students will focus on poetry, illness and pastoral care. Students will work with healing stories, both contemporary and ancient, from a multi-religious perspective, and craft their own. They will develop and/or deepen their pastoral skills and personal spiritual practices through weekly exercises. [PIN code required; 26 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

FORGIVENESS (PS-8430)

Credits:3

FORGIVENESS & MORAL REPAIR In this on-line class, we will meet people from all over the world, from a variety of religious and cultural traditions, who have practiced forgiveness as a means of healing, reconciliation and/or liberation. We will also explore the concept of ^moral repair^ or how we individually and collectively might apologize, repent, and/or make amends after wrong-doing. Through readings, films, and spiritual practice exercises we will develop our ^forgiveness^ muscles. We will also explore ways of using forgiveness to strengthen our pastoral, prophetic and public ministries. This class will be experientia and multi-faith, drawing on personal and communal narratives, neuroscience, and psychology. Evaluation will be based on weekly reflections, spiritual practice exercises, and class discussion.[Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

MORAL INJURY & SOUL REPAIR (PSED-4010)

Credits:1.5

The first week of this course can be taken alone for 1.5 credits or both weeks can be taken together for 3.0 credits. Recent works by Veterans Affairs clinicians have suggested that moral injury, which remains largely unaddressed, may be a greater factor than PTSD in alarmingly high veteran suicide rates (at least 3 times the general population). In examining the distinctions and relationship between the two and their relation to conditions of extremity in a number of professions, we will study aspects of moral formation in general and in military training, theological understandings of soul and conscience, affective neuroscience on empathy and ritual, the power of ritual in soul repair, and civilian moral responsibility for the aftermath of war. The goal of the first week of the seminar will be to study these ideas as they assist in helping communities in the work of soul repair after war, violence, and other conditions of extremity that challenge moral conscience. During the second week, participants will continue researching areas of interest with a focus on effective pedagogies for educating religious leaders and their communities, designing rituals for soul repair, and creating a two day conference to implement this work, not only in content, but also in conference design. The last two days of the course will be the conference itself. NOTE: For registration & summer session policies, see www.psr.edu/summer. Course meets weekdays 7/14/14- 7/18/14 or 7/26/14, from 1:30-5:30pm, at MUDD 103. [Auditors excluded]

PASTORAL CARE (PSFT-1009)

Credits:1.5

This is an introductory course in the psychological dynamics of pastoral care in Roman Catholic ministry. It is not a practicum in pastoral counseling techniques. Topics will include: Relational Models of Personality; Psychosexual Development; Transference and Counter-transference; Self-care; Identity Formation; Ethnicity and Family Systems; Death, Dying and Grief; Domestic Violence and Sexual Abuse; and Personality Disorders. The course may be taken either for 1.5 credits or 3.0 credits. Requirements include: Weekly readings, group activities, and final paper/project.

PSYCHOLOGY AND RELIGION (PSFT-4100)

Credits:3

Psychology is one of the fundamental disciplinary lenses employed in the study of Religion. In this seminar, we will read foundational theoretical texts and consider the ministerial application of psychological methods and insights. The readings and lecture topics were intentionally chosen to be useful for both academic and ministerial students serving diverse populations (MA, MDiv). Student grades will be determined by attendance, participation, and the choice of either one research paper or two reflection papers, 20 pages total. This course is taught by Ph.D student Daniel Moceri under the mentorship of Dr. Arthur Holder and supported by a Newhall Award.

PSYCHOLOGY AND MEDITATION (PSIR-4000)

Credits:3

Psychology and Religion can be symbiotic conversation partners when considering the myriad practices and theories associated with ^meditation.^ In this seminar we will read foundational sacred and secondary texts from Hindu, Buddhist, and Christian traditions, putting them in dialogue with relevant work from the field of Psychology. Grading will be determined by attendance, participation, and a 15-page term paper. This course is appropriate for all Masters level students. Residential only. [20 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

INTRO TO YOGA PSYCHOLOGY (PSPH-4100)

Credits:3

^Yoga is nothing but practical psychology^ stated a famous sage of the twentieth century, Sri Aurobindo. It is not a mode of ^physical fitness^ but is embedded in contemplative models based on an expansive psychological study of the nature of mind. Given that the strict dichotomous distinction of psychology and philosophy did not exist in the Hindu thought, this course will discuss yoga psychology within the larger context of yoga philosophy beginning with the ^Yogasutras of Patanjali.^ It will then advance to discussing psychology within the overall Vedantic framework of Sri Adi Sankaracharya, Sri Ramana Maharshi, and Swami Vivekananda. The discussions and lectures will include current psychological issues and problems faced by humanity within the larger context of the Yoga worldview. The psycho-spiritual transformation is highly essential in realizing the true objective of yoga-union with the divine-but there are many layers that have to be transformed before the objective is achieved, and the course will keep that in view. Requirements include a quiz, class discussions based on reading reflections, and a term paper. This course is appropriate for MA, MDiv, and PhD students (additional research).

CROSS-CULTURAL PASTORAL CARE (PSRS-2801)

Credits:3

This course offers a detailed examination of various racial/ethnic cultures within the Christian Church. Its aim is to equip students with knowledge about various cultures and how religious leaders can become more sensitive to the needs and interests of individuals within these groups. The course will address racism, xenophobia and classism as destructive forces in faith communities and explore ways to dismantle these structures in order to provide racial/ethnic healing and reconciliation. Through narrative, case studies and academic texts, this course will further examine the plight of the poor and pastoral care for economically marginalized individuals. In an exploration of cultural narratives, students will be invited to share their cultural narratives by engaging other cultural narratives. This approach allows for greater pastoral care, sensitivity, and awareness.

SEXUALITY AND PASTORAL CARE (PSRS-4160)

Credits:3

This course is a study of Christian sexuality and pastoral care approaches. Drawing from the work of theologians, James Nelson, Carter Heyward, and pastoral theologians Joretta Marshall and Larry Kent Graham, this course will explore issues of human sexuality and pastoral care. Students will study religious texts and ecclesial conversations in constructing pastoral care responses to such issues as pre and post marital sex, marriage and divorce, betrothal, and women's and lesbian and gay ordination. Students will develop pastoral skills to facilitate difficult conversations about human sexuality. In this respect, students will be expected to understand traditional as well as progressive approaches to human sexuality. Special attention will be devoted to examining case studies and church policies/practices regarding lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender issues and assisting individuals and families through crises and celebrations regarding sexuality.

ADDICTION AND RECOVERY (PSRS-8427)

Credits:3

Addiction can be understood as the persistent desire to fill an existential void. Pastoral counselors and faith community leaders have a unique opportunity to identify the signs and symptoms of addiction, providing an opening for support towards recovery. This course will offer practical models of basic engagement with people who are actively using or in recovery from drugs, alcohol, and other addictions. Students will gain a solid foundation in current theories, diagnosis, and interventions in addiction and recovery. Topics covered will included the biochemistry of addiction, identifying patterns of addiction, motivational interviewing towards change, dual diagnosis, the spirituality of recovery. The class will also debate conflicting models of understanding addiction, conflicting treatment philosophies, and personal and professional ethics around drug use. [20 max enrollment; PIN code required; Auditors excluded]