Course Information

 

for Sacred Texts and Their Interpretation Department


NT INTRODUCTION: (NT-1004)

Credits:3

GOSPELS AND ACTS. This course is a general introduction to the canonical and apocryphal Gospels and Acts in early Christian literature. Major methodological issues in current Gospel scholarship will be introduced first. Then, each text of the Gospels and Acts will be interpreted in terms of its literary characteristics, historical background and theological ideas. Throughout the course, explicitly or implicitly, hermeneutical implications of the critical interpretation of the bible will be raised and discussed. This course is taught by PhD student Grace Eunhye So with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Dr. Eugene Eung-Chun Park.

INTRO TO NT (NT-1005)

Credits:3

PAULINE EPISTLES This course is an introduction to the life, work, and theology of Paul as they are reflected in his epistles in the New Testament and in other related documents within and outside the NT. The course will reconstruct Paul's life and ministry and survey his letters in their chronological order. Special attention will be paid to the particular historical circumstances and theological concerns of each letter. The primary mode of inquiry in this course is historical-critical, but hermeneutical questions will also be raised with regard to the application of Pauline theology to current theological issues. Lecture and discussion. Midterm exam and final research paper. MDiv, MA/MABL/MATS

INTRO TO THE NEW TESTAMENT (NT-1008)

Credits:3

INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW TESTAMENT The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the collection of writings that we come to call the New Testament. Students will learn about the New Testament through reading, writing, discussions, along with other artistic mediums such as art, poetry, and films. As an introductory course students will become familiar with the historical context, culture, and the politics that lead to the production of this text. In addition to the traditional historical critical approach to the text, students will be introduced to other methods such as feminist, queer, postmodern, and postcolonial readings that will help us deconstruct these texts and reconstruct interpretations that are socially, ethically, and politically relevant to the world we live. This course has no pre-requisites.

INTRODUCTION TO NEW TESTAMENT (NT-1011)

Credits:3

This course studies the writings of the New Testament in their historical, cultural, social, and religious contexts. The student is introduced to the basic content, structure, and motifs of the NT writings; the theory and practice of major integrative methodologies; the hermeneutical and other critical issues of modern biblical studies; the resources for understanding, preaching and teaching the NT. Evaluation through exams of key biblical terms and one paper. [25 max enrollment; PIN code required]

CRITICAL INTRO TO NT (NT-1016)

Credits:3

This introductory course to the New Testament begins by familiarizing students with some basic issues of the text (manuscript transmission, translation, and canon) and the Greco-Roman and Judaic context of its writing. We will then focus on the diverse body of texts that form the NT itself, paying special attention to various methodologies of interpretation and the perspectives they represent. Intended Audience: MDiv, MA. SUMMER 2016 Class meets weekdays 7/25/16-8/5/16 from 9am-1pm, in MUDD 102.

EXEGESIS OF THE NEW TESTAMENT (NT-1018)

Credits:1.5

A hands-on introduction to historical-critical, literary and ideological methods of interpreting the New Testament. [35 max enrollment]

INTRO TO NT GREEK (NT-1070)

Credits:3

Part one of a two semester course sequence designed to enable students to read the Greek New Testament. While learning Greek vocabulary and grammar, students also gain skill in using Accordance Bible software as an aid to reading and research. Non-PLTS students enrolled in the course may purchase the required software at a considerable discount through PLTS. Required for first-year PLTS MDiv students who have not elected the Spanish alternative or have not otherwise fulfilled the language requirement. [12 max enrollment]

NEW TESTAMENT MIRACLE STORIES (NT-1500)

Credits:3

In this class we will focus on the question of reality in New Testament miracle stories. We will pursue this question in the light of ancient narratives, pilgrimages, medical texts, and visual images, the latter especially from the Catacombs. Since David Hume if not earlier, the interpretation of miracle stories has been dominated in the West by the binary distinction of fact vs. fiction. Even the latest research accepts this modern opposition as self-evident. The resulting ontology continues to underly the form-critical study of NT miracle stories, leading to interpretive nuances that presuppose the distinction of fact vs. fiction but have no basis in either the texts in question or their concepts of reality. The class will examine critically this extraneous mixing of modern concepts of reality with interpretations of miracles. To this end, the class will address how ancient concepts of reality, always complex, came to expression in stories of miraculous healings/ gifts/ changes of nature and their reception in ancient medicine, art, literature, theology and philosophy. Audience: MDiv, MA/MTS. [Introductory Greek]

LUKE-ACTS (NT-2026)

Credits:3

This course is a study of Luke-Acts as vehicles for exploring a variety of important textual, historical, and theological issues. Particular attention is given to Jesus (re-)founding the people of God and teaching theological, political and social values to a worshipping community. This course will engage the following questions: Is Luke-Acts a biography or a historiography? How is Luke related to Marcion? What is meant when Luke-Acts speak of nations, ^the other,^ Greeks, Jews and Samaritans? Of women? How is this related to mission? This course will engage texts from New Testament with iconography (images of ancient art) and methods in interpreting such as postcolonial method and the so-called Freiburg School. We shall study not only the Greco-Roman / Jewish context in which Luke-Acts was written, but also some twentieth-century approaches, and the way in which their sometimes orientalizing enterprises constructed the field of biblical studies. Audience: MDiv., MA, PhD, certificate students.

THE FOURTH GOSPEL (NT-2221)

Credits:1.5

THE FOURTH GOSPEL: TALES OF A JEWISH MYSTIC The purpose of this class, The Fourth Gospel: Tales of a Jewish Mystic, is to lift the Gospel of John out of the Bible in general and away from the other gospels, in particular, so that it can be studied in its own integrity. We will identify the unique themes found in the Fourth Gospel and seek to understand those themes in the light of the context of the history of the late first century when this gospel was being written. This means we will spend some time analyzing the different patterns of thought revealed in the Fourth Gospel, from the low Christology of the earlier part of this book to the higher Christology of the latter parts. We will speculate on the number of authors that might be revealed in the analysis. The course will proceed by breaking John's Gospel into its constituent parts and studying each in turn. Class meets daily, 7/14/14-7/18/14, from 9:00am-1:00pm at PSR Chapel. [Auditors excluded]

CONTEXTUAL READING OF LUKE (NT-2247)

Credits:3

Correlations of Luke with the readers' contextual settings. Evaluation of the relevance of a broad range of scholarly interpretations of Luke for contextual interpretation. Reading of a selection of passages in Luke and of academic commentaries. Format: Round table/seminar/lecture. Course can be used by JSTB students as contextual course. Evaluation: Weekly reports/participation. [12 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

LUKE-ACTS (NT-2248)

Credits:3

THIS CLASS WILL BE TAUGHT IN KOREAN. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the socio-historical backgrounds, literary characters and theological aspects of the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles. By understanding the books in terms of the Greco- Roman world of the first two centuries, this course will pay attention to the literary style, normative framework, theological motifs, and socio-historical context of the Lucan community. The students who successfully complete this course will be able to: 1)understand the literary genre of Luke-Acts in the Greco-Roman literary world; 2)describe the history of the early Christian movement; 3)articulate the main theological issues of Luke and Acts; 4)identify the socio-historical situation of the Lucan community located behind the books; and 5)figure out the contemporary scholarly debates about the books of Luke and Acts.

HERESY OF BIBLICAL LITERALISM (NT-2273)

Credits:1.5

Biblical Literalism: A Gentile Heresy -- A Journey into a New Christianity through the Doorway of Matthew's Gospel Why is a literal reading of the Gospels is actually heretical? How is it that this mistaken notion of literalism only entered the church once Gentiles had pushed out all the Jewish followers of Jesus? We'll take a radical new look at the gospels today to see just how deeply Jewish the Christian Gospels are, and how much they reflect the Jewish scriptures, history, and patterns of worship. Pulling back the layers of a long-standing Gentile ignorance, we will see how the church's literal reading of the Bible is so far removed from these original Jewish authors' intent that may be considered act of heresy. Using the Gospel of Matthew as a guide, we will explore the Bible's literary and liturgical roots-its grounding in Jewish culture, symbols, icons, and storytelling tradition-to explain how the events of Jesus' life, including the virgin birth, the miracles, the details of the passion story, and the resurrection and ascension, would have been understood by both the Jewish authors of the various gospels and by the Jewish audiences for which they were originally written. Class meets weekdays, 7/11/16-7/15/16, from 9:00am-1:00pm at PSR Chapel. NOTE: For registration & summer session policies, see www.psr.edu/summer.

THE PARABLES OF JESUS (NT-2302)

Credits:3

The purpose of this course is twofold: to explore social history of the New Testament times as mirrored in the parables of Jesus and to read the theological message of these texts as related to people's everday life. Method will include lecture and discussion; required reading; four short papers and a final paper. [Intro to NT; 25 max enrollment; Auditors excluded] Class meets for two weeks in July 2007, with dates and times to be determined.

PAUL (NT-2500)

Credits:3

An examination of Paul's life, letters, and theology, as well as of the deutero-Pauline letters and theology. Debated today, e.g., are Paul's relationship to Jesus, more broadly his relationship to contemporary Judaism(s), whether justification by faith is the center of his theology, his attitude to women's leadership in the congregations, what Paul meant by advising slaves to remain in their ^call,^ his relationship to Roman imperialism, and how the deutero-Pauline epistles (re)interpret Paul's theology and ecclesiology. This introduction to Pauline letters will also include practicing exegesis, as well as increasing awareness of Judeo/Greco/Roman culture, religion, and society, e.g., of the houses in which Pauline congregations lived and worshipped. [25 max enrollment]

PAULINE SOTERIOLOGY (NT-2515)

Credits:3

This lecture course will present a post- Bultmannian (^New Perspective^) account of Pauline Soteriology. The nine lectures will cover Introduction, Inside/Outside, Predestination, Faith, Baptism, Moral Purity, Love, Eucharist, and Hope. During the second week the students will present reports on significant ^New Perspective^ authors and there will be a written examination on the last day of class. Class meets weekdays, 6/7/10-6/18/10, from 9:00am-12:30pm, in DSPT 18.

PAUL'S LETTERS-CONTEXT & THLGY (NT-2523)

Credits:3

Exegetical and theological study of Paul's letters as expressions of an early Christian contextual theology. Location of each letter in the whole Pauline corpus. Survey of theological themes with emphasis on their contemporary relevance. Lectures/assignments/presentation/research paper. The course is intended for MDiv, MTS, MA, and STL students [25 max enrollment]

POSTCOLONIAL READINGS OF LUKE (NT-3104)

Credits:3

PRIMARILY TAUGHT IN KOREAN, this course focuses on re-reading the Gospel of Luke through postcolonial hermeneutics. This course is an exegetical workshop that gives students opportunities to re-evaluate and build their exegetical methods. High class participation is expected as students reassess how they have been interpreting Luke in light of Eurocentrism, colonial mentality, neocolonialism, and other postcolonial perspectives. Format: Lecture and discussion. Evaluation: Class presentation and final paper. [NT introductory course] NOTE: This course is taught by PhD student Dong Hyeon Jeong with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Drs. Sangyil Park and Tat-Siong Benny Liew.

LUKE-ACTS (NT-4007)

Credits:3

LUKE-ACTS: POSTCOLONIAL READING This course focuses on reading the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles through postcolonial perspectives with an interest for social justice. The first part of the course surveys postcolonial theories. The second part introduces various ways to interpret Luke-Acts from a postcolonial perspective. The third and fourth parts examine passages in Luke-Acts with various theories/methods found in postcolonial literature and contextualizes interpretations of the text. Students practice their own postcolonial interpretation of two passages, one from the Gospel of Luke and the other from the Acts of the Apostles. Overall, this course is an exploratory and pioneering exegetical workshop for students, which will enlarge their view on reading, interpreting, and relating biblical texts for them and the people to whom they will minister. Format: lectures/class discussions. Evaluation: a short written assignment, student presentations, exegetical papers. For MDiv, STM, STL, MA, PhD and STD students. This course is co-taught by Hyun Ho Park with a Newhall Award. [15 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

NT & HELLNSTIC MIRACLE STORIES (NT-4500)

Credits:3

This seminar will study the NT miracle stories in the context of other Jewish, Christian and Greco-Roman miracle stories, in order to determine the social functions and theological meanings of miracle telling. We will also consider in what ways and for what purposes miracle stories are used in written texts including the NT gospels and the Apocryphal Acts. [Greek will be used. Those who have not studied Greek may negotiate an alternate contribution to the class.]

APOCALYPSE & IMAGINATION (NT-4650)

Credits:3

This seminar focuses on the Apocalypse of John (Revelation) in ancient and later interpretations. We'll begin by considering other ancient apocalyptic literature, the origins and influences of apocalyptic, and its role in ancient Jewish and early Christian faiths. We'll then study apocalyptic as understood in medieval, modern, and postmodern imaginations, considering interpretations - not just textual but multimedia and societal - dealing with themes of disaster, end-of-history, politics, and the environment.

AS NVER SEEN B4:VISIONS IN NT (NT-4900)

Credits:3

This seminar will examine material from the NT which describe visionary experiences found in the synoptic Gospels, the Acts of the Apostles, 2 Corinthians, and Revelation. It will use approaches from cultural anthropology, intertextuality, narrative criticism, and media studies to study these segments of the NT. Format: lectures/seminar. Evaluation: student presentations, short written assignments, term paper. [15 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

IN-CARNATION INTO THE WORLD (NT-8004)

Credits:3

This course is the online section of NT-1004. The Gospels emerge in social and complex political context of the Roman Empire. This course examines the Gospels and contemporaneous texts within their first-century Greco-Roman contexts (especially Jewish contexts), pays attention to archaeological and inscriptional materials of the time, and demonstrates contemporary hermeneutical strategies, including feminist and postcolonial. Students will also consider the controversial contemporary contexts in which they and others interpret the New Testament. MDiv, MA.

HISTORICAL JESUS - THEN & NOW (NT-8113)

Credits:3

This course provides a general introduction through the Quest of the Historical Jesus to the life and activity of the first century revolutionary prophet. Who was Jesus before he became an object of belief and worship? Why did his movement happen right there and then? What was the ^good news^ that turned the ancient world upside down? We will consider the best available canonical as well as non-canonical literary and other evidences, will examine assumptions underlying the discipline (politics of interpretation), discuss methodologies and the limits of the historical investigation and also consider and evaluate several fascinating scholarly reconstructions. We keep a heavy emphasis on the social sciences in this class, that helps us understand how Jesus himself was embedded in a specific history and culture, and how is he and his counter cultural message relevant today in a postcolonial setting? [PIN code required; 13 max enrollment]

NT INTRODUCTION: GOSPELS (NT-8114)

Credits:3

This course is a general introduction to the canonical and apocryphal Gospels and Acts in early Christian literature. Major methodological issues in current Gospel scholarship will be introduced first. Then, each text of the Gospels and Acts will be interpreted in terms of its literary characteristics, historical background and theological ideas. Throughout the course hermeneutical implications of the critical interpretation of the bible will be raised and discussed.

INTERPRETING THE GOSPELS (NT-8175)

Credits:3

This online course introduces the four canonical gospels and several apocryphal gospels, with a focus on their theologies as well as on contemporary methods of interpretation. The class is primarily for pastors who will be preaching, reflecting ethically, and giving pastoral care for parishioners in dialogue with these gospels with their narratives and words of Jesus. [20 max enrollment]

RACIAL/ETHNIC READING OF NT (NT-8310)

Credits:3

^Racial/Ethnic Minority Readings of the New Testament^: This intermediate level course will survey racial/ethnic minoritization in the US and explore how various minorities groups and persons negotiate with the New Testament through their racialization and with their racialization through the New Testament. We will also investigate how different minority groups employ different reading strategies to approach the New Testament, and how those strategies also change over time. This ONLINE course meets asynchronously using Moodle. It has no required meeting times. High-speed internet connection required. See http://moodle.gtu.edu/mod/resource/view.php?id=227 17 for full technology requirements.

GOSPEL OF MATTHEW IN CONTEXTS (NT-8450)

Credits:3

This is an on-line course on the Gospel of Matthew in its historical setting in the first century Mediterranean world. The class will introduce the current status of Matthean scholarship and discuss a major shift of perspectives among contemporary Matthean scholars regarding the author's relation with Judaism. Then important passages in Matthew will be interpreted through standard exegetical methods and major themes of Matthew's theology will also be discussed accordingly. Along with the historical critical method(s), which is the primary interpretive tool in this course, the class will explore some of the newer reading strategies that constitute part of the rubric of postmodern hermeneutics to see how the ancient text could come alive and shed light on contemporary issues. [PIN code required; 20 max enrollment]

GENDER & SEXUALITY IN THE NT (NTBS-3007)

Credits:3

PARABLES OF JESUS (NTBS-4500)

Credits:3

This course explores the rich reservoir of meanings of the parables of Jesus in the canonical gospels and in the apocryphal literature. We will first study the ancient Greek traditions of fables, parables, allegorical stories, and novels as well as Jewish parables as the backdrop of the parables of Jesus. We will also place the parables of Jesus in the socio-economic realities of the advanced agrarian society and interpret them through the perspectives of the target audiences as they are suggested in the gospel narratives. We will also experiment various forms of reader-response criticism on the parables to see what new meanings have emerged or can be produced over and beyond the "original" meaning.

INTRPRTING BIBLE:MTHDS/ISSUES (NTOT-1701)

Credits:3

This course, the second of a year-long sequence, will explore the history, methods, and problems related to interpreting the Bible within a variety of intellectual and religious communities. We intend to look at how both the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and the New Testament have been read and used by readers who are differently situated or located. We will accomplish our goal by continuing the study of the development and use of various methods of reading the texts, and on the hermeneutical concerns and problems these methods resolve and/or create. In our exploration of these methods, we will try to provide illustrations by using various biblical texts as well as addressing some topics of significance. Our primary goal will be to provide each student with some beginning skills, both practical and theoretical, in the interpretation of biblical texts. Our secondary goal will be to provide students with some sense of the varying emphases that are found within different books of the Bible.

INTERPRETING SACRED TEXTS (NTOT-1709)

Credits:3

This course, building upon the historical, socio-cultural, and religious background provided in the Fall course, OTNT 1708, will focus on various hermeneutical approaches to and exegetical readings of the biblical texts. Special attention will be given to the contextual nature of reading, including the social location of the reader.

GSPL OF MARK AS INSTANT CINEMA (NTRA-2198)

Credits:3

An in-depth study of the Gospel of Mark: its content, structure, sequence and meaning. In addition to a verse-by-verse examination of the Gospel, an effort will be made to discern the purposes of Mark in creating the Gospel genre; the sociological situation of the community for which he wrote; and the impact of Mark's Gospel on later Gospels. A special feature of the course will be the screening of movie clips depicting events in Mark's Gospel. Weekly reflection papers and a creative term project.

MYTHS, GOSPEL, AND HUMAN LIVES (NTRS-2360)

Credits:3

This intermediate-level course will attempt to evaluate the category of ^myth^ as a lens to read and think about the stories related to the gospel or ^good news^ about Jesus, and how those stories relate to human lives. The majority of the course will seek to acquaint students with both the theories and specifics of myths. We will look at the work of myth critics (Frazer, Eliade, Levi-Strauss, Burke, Ricoeur), several ancient Near Eastern myths and a couple from other cultures and geographical areas, Rudolf Bultmann's demythologizing project, as well as Paul Tillich's understanding of ^broken myths.^ Then we will turn to look at the effects--both socio-political and individual--of myths. Issues concerning the relationship of myth to ritual, of myth to history, and of myth to faith and life will also be raised. Class meets weekdays, 7/20/15-7/31/15, from 1:30pm-5:30pm, at MUDD 102. NOTE: For registration, see www.psr.edu/summer.

GENDER, SEXUALITY, AND THE NT (NTRS-3515)

Credits:3

This intermediate course considers the constructions of gender and sexuality in the ancient world and in the New Testament. We will be analyzing several key and problematic NT texts, as well as ancient medical, philosophical, and religious texts. Essential to our discussion will also be a survey of current and recent discussions about the constructedness of gender, sexuality, and biological sex. Students are expected to present in class and write a final research paper. For MDiv students with some flexibility for students requiring a higher level course. [15 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

GENDER, SEXUALITY, AND THE NT (NTRS-8351)

Credits:3

This intermediate online course considers the constructions of gender and sexuality in the ancient world and in the New Testament. We will be analyzing several key and problematic NT texts, as well as ancient medical, philosophical, and religious texts. Essential to our discussion will also be a survey of current and recent discussions about the constructedness of gender, sexuality, and biological sex. Students are expected to write weekly responses to course material, as well as to other student responses, and submit a final research paper. For MDiv students with some flexibility for students requiring a higher level course. This ONLINE course meets asynchronously using Moodle. It has no required meeting times. High-speed internet connection required. See http://moodle.gtu.edu/mod/resource/view.php?id=227 17 for full technology requirements. {PIN code required; 25 max enrollment]

SPIRITUALITY OF NT HYMNS (NTSP-3620)

Credits:1.5

INTERPRETING THE BODY (NTST-4577)

Credits:3

THE BODY IN THE BIBLE, THEOLOGY AND SCIENCE: This course will engage the following questions: what role does the body play in personhood? in gender? in our relation to ourselves and to God? in creation and redemption? We will also ask: how should we get beyond the substance dualism of body and soul to a holistic understanding of personhood? We will follow the promise of healing via eschatological new creation as it appears in ancient Israel, Greco-Roman literature (esp. medicine and philosophy), New Testament, and systematic theology. Theological commitments will be placed in creative mutual interaction with natural science, especially genetics, neuroscience, transhumanism, and physical cosmology. Audience: MDiv, MA, PhD, certificate students.

INTRO TO THE OLD TESTAMENT (OT-1076)

Credits:3

This course provides a survey of the Hebrew Bible, focusing on the texts in their historical and literary contexts. Students will learn to read the texts from various perspectives and evaluate the notion of the literature as sacred texts both for ancient readers as well as contemporary faith communities. Evaluation will be based on written assignments and class presentations. [Fall 2018: 30 max enrollment]

HEBREW SCRIP & X'TN FAITH I (OT-1104)

Credits:3

Introduction to the three major parts of the Hebrew Bible (law, prophets and writings) in their ancient setting, and as a resource for Christian understanding and ministry. [30 max enrollment/signature on reg card]

THE OLD TESTAMENT (OT-1110)

Credits:3

The course will provide an introduction to the study of the OT. Students will be challenged to view the writings of the OT within their own time and culture and to transfer their message to contemporary faith and life.

CRITICAL INTRO TO HEBREW BIBLE (OT-1115)

Credits:3

This course gives an overview of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, particularly the history, archaeology, societies, religions, and various cultural and political forces that shaped and influenced the preserved text. The geographic focus of the lectures will focus on the southern Levant (Holy Land) in its Near Eastern contexts, the temporal range will be approximately 2000-333 BCE. Themes will be stressed that echo PSR's core values, with special focus on leadership in its biblical forms, critical thinking, contexts (both ancient and modern), race/ethnicity, sexuality, and gender. Audiences: MDiv, MA. NOTE: This course is the in-class version of OT 8114 Critical Introduction to Hebrew Bible. Students wishing to take the online version of this class should register for OT 8114. [Auditors with faculty permission]

EXEGESIS OF THE HEBREW BIBLE (OT-1713)

Credits:1.5

An introduction to biblical criticism and exegetical methods. Must be taken in conjunction with OT 1115. Format: lecture and seminar; Evaluation: class participation, short exegetical papers, and one final exegetical paper. [20 max enrollment per section]

HEBREW SCRIPTURES WORKSHOP (OT-1900)

Credits:0

The one-day workshop affords hands-on experience with basic Bible resources used in GTU OT courses, and provides a practical introduction to the exegetical process through Reader/workbook-guided small group work. STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO BRING THE ^OT WORKSHOP READER/WORKBOOK^ TO USE IN THE WORKSHOP (Order from Copy Central, Hearst Ave). The Reader/workbook also functions as a continuing self-teaching resource for students and in their church communities. The workshop format is similar to the NT workshop but focuses on OT materials. Class meets in the Mudd Bldg. Fall 2012: Sat 9/8 10am-4pm: Wed 9/12, 1:15-7pm. (This is a repeat of Sat 9/8, 10am-4pm.); Spring 2013: Sat 2/16, 10am-4pm. Mudd 101. [Max enrollment 15; Auditors excluded]

TEACHING THE OT: AN INTRO (OT-2025)

Credits:3

This course has two primary goals: 1)to introduce the history, literature, and theology of the Old Testament, focusing on Torah and Prophets and the period from the patriarchs to the Judean exile; 2)to address the challenges of teaching this literature in light of its ^user-unfriendliness^ (cultural, literary, historical characteristics). Special attention will be given to the critical exegetical methodologies, biblical content, and various tools and pedagogical strategies (including technological resources) which may aid in the teaching of this literature. The format will be lectures and discussion with written exercises, Bible content exams, and exegetical papers providing means of evaluation. Intended audience: MDiv. [Auditors with Faculty permission]

BEYONCE AND THE HEBREW BIBLE (OT-2054)

Credits:3

This course will explore the social discourse and politics surrounding the music and public persona of Beyonce Knowles. The course will use Knowles a paradigmatic figure to explore issues of womanist thought, with particular interest in topics of race, class, and gender, focusing on concepts of sexuality, embodiment, agency, etc. These popular social and political issues will serve as a framework to evaluate various texts in the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

WOMANIST-FEM BIBLICAL INTERP (OT-2076)

Credits:3

WOMANIST-FEMINIST BIBLICAL INTERPRETATION This course will use intersecting disciplines of ethical theory and literature as tools to construct various approaches to womanist and feminist biblical hermeneutics. As such, the class will require students to develop paradigms for understanding concepts of race, ethnicity, and gender as competing and intersecting realities both within the Bible and in its use and misuse in reader reception throughout history.

PENTATEUCH & FORMER PROPHETS (OT-2094)

Credits:3

This course, proceeding by lecture and discussion, will involve close, critical and careful study of the Pentateuch and Former Prophets (Joshua through 2 Kings), highlighting the main historical/ social issues, the literary tools useful for analysis, and the relevance of the books to various communities receiving them, including ourselves. The books of Genesis and Deuteronomy will anchor study of the other books. Issues of land- its fruitfulness and fragility-will be central. Participants can expect to write about 25 pages, likely in shorter and focused segments (though to write a research paper is an option). Regular, prepared participation is also expected, demonstrating familiarity with both texts and methods of study. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

PENTATEUCH & HISTORICAL BOOKS (OT-2102)

Credits:3

Introduction to historical, literary, and theological criticism of Genesis--II Kings. This course will examine critical theories of Israel's origins, the purpose and message of each Pentateuchal source, the role of myth and story in biblical literature, the various sources employed by the Deuteronomist in writing Israel's history, and the role of archaeology in corroborating this literature. Special attention will be given to theological issues encountered, especially as they relate to ministry, and an intro- duction to exegetical method will be offered. Fulfills JSTB requirement. [Auditors with permission of instructor]

OLD TESTAMENT PROPHETS (OT-2142)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to Old Testament prophets and prophetical books. It assumes prior knowledge about the historical-critical study of the Old Testament and the outlines of the history of Israel. Course format: Mixture of lecture and seminar. Method of evaluation: Quizzes, short essays, final exam. [OT intro (OT 1200 or equivalent)]

HOSEA (OT-2148)

Credits:3

THIS COURSE IS TAUGHT IN KOREAN. This course will examine what the message of Hosea is with special attention to the varied pictures of God's love and judgment which are described by multiple imageries. Each chapter of Hosea will be interpreted in terms of its literary characteristics, socio-historical background and theological ideas. All along, explicitly or implicitly, hermeneutical implications of the critical interpretation of Hosea will be raised and reflected upon, so the course will help discern analogies between the prophet's words and worlds and our own.

OT AS SCRIPTURE: (OT-2158)

Credits:3

An introduction to the Pentateuch, historical books, and the pre-exilic prophets. Special attention given to reading biblical texts, exegesis, the nature and use of scripture, and the teaching of the Bible. Lecture/discussion with exams and papers.

JEREMIAH AND EMPIRE (OT-2198)

Credits:3

This course examines the book of the prophet Jeremiah and its historical context amidst the Neo-Assyrian and Neo-Babylonian empires. The portrayal of the prophet in the theo-political roles as advisor to kings, divine messenger to peoples and nations, as well as representative of YHWH will be explored, especially as this sheds light on the peculiarities of prophecy in this book. Exploration of the text will call attention to theological, liturgical and societal implications for contemporary faith communities. This exploration will be done with the help of postcolonial theory, empire studies and other critical theory. Evaluation of the course includes class participation, written assignments and an exegetical project. Fulfills PLTS Prophets requirement for PLTS students. [An intro course in OT; Auditors with Faculty permission]

THE GOD OF THE OLD TESTAMENT (OT-2294)

Credits:3

A consideration of the Old Testament portrayal of God. Special attention will be given to various narratives and prophetic oracles that depict God in unusual and problematic ways. Issues of divine power and presence, judgement and salvation, revelation and healing will center the course. Class meets weekdays, 1/5-1/16/98 and 1/20-1/23/98 from 8:30am to 11:30am.

THE PSALMS (OT-2511)

Credits:3

This course is an exegetical seminar. Special attention will be given to the forms found in the Psalms and their particular characteristics and uses; the history of Psalm interpretation; the life and cycle of prayer manifest in the Psalms. Primary and secondary reading, discussion and exegetical presentations as well as a final exegetical paper constitute the course requirements and evaluation methods. [OT Introduction; 15 max enrollment; PIN code required; Auditors with Faculty permission]

WISDOM/DEUTEROCANONICAL BOOKS (OT-2604)

Credits:3

A seminar for MDiv students to develop a knowledge of the Wisdom and Deuterocanonical that will afford them an intelligent, mature recourse to these Scriptures in ministerial settings (parish, school, specialized ministries). Studying these texts in their original setting (historical and social location, literary appreciation and grasp of each book's theology) will assist participants to ask similar questions of contemporary contexts. JST students may take this course as PRAXIS class, attending to ecclesial settings, such as preaching, liturgical prayer and song, pastoral counseling and teaching. Active participation in the seminar; each student will plan and develop one class session; papers (2 brief, one longer). [OT Introduction; PIN code required; 12 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

WISDOM/WRITINGS (OT-2608)

Credits:3

The course provides a survey of most (not all) the books from the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible's wisdom and writing materials, focused around a particular pair of questions related to answerable living: What is the good life envisioned and described? How do humans achieve and/or receive it? The course is aimed at the intermediate level (so for MA/MDiv/MABL students) who ideally will have had an introduction to OT (e.g., BSSP 1066, Modules A, B). The course is lecture/discussion, with the format varying from session to session. Required will be a good deal of reading (biblical and secondary), active presence and participation, three to five short written assignments, a willingness to engage critical issues of biblical study. Grades will be based on effective discussion and presentation of material well-understood and made useful for participants. Alternative assignment: Those needing a research paper may request to do one. [A recent critical introduction to OT; Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

THE BOOK OF JOB (OT-3220)

Credits:3

An exegetical study of the Book of Job. Attention will be given to the literary features and theological issues of the book. Heavy reading of secondary literature, including Endo, Tan, Gutierrez, and MacLeish. Knowledge of Hebrew is helpful, though not a prerequisite. Format: Lecture and small group discussions. Evaluation: Class participation, critical responses to readings, exegesis papers, and one final paper. [Intro to OT and NT and exegesis; 15 max enrollment; PIN code required; Auditors excluded]

OLD TESTAMENT THEOLOGY (OT-3480)

Credits:1.5

Who is God? What does God think about people? What are God's hopes and plans for the world? These are some of the essential questions of theology. In this course, we will go back to the beginnings - to the Old Testament, the earliest reflections on God from the Jewish, Christian, or Muslim traditions - in search of a contemporary and relevant way to answer timeless questions. Within the ancient text, we'll find enduring insights and controversies, as a ground for our own theological search in the present contexts. Class meets daily, 7/9/12-7/13/12, from 9:00am- 1:00pm, in MUDD 103.

THE BIBLE AND IMMIGRATION (OT-4091)

Credits:3

The Scriptures of ancient Israel and early Christianity depict a variety of immigration movements, including exiles, forced migrations, conscriptions, refugee conditions, captivities, and enslavements. This course will examine the social and historical conditions of these migrants and their movements, as well as biblical renderings and interpretations of their condition, with special interest in how immigrant experience formed communal identity and served as a primary metaphor for religious and cultural self understanding. We will also investigate the role of religious communities in current immigration situations, to see how inclusion of immigrants leads to religious vitality.

JOSH & JUDG-AFR/AFR AM PERSP (OT-4109)

Credits:3

JOSHUA AND JUDGES - AFRICAN/ AFRICAN AM PERSPECTIVES This course studies the narratives of the books of Joshua and Judges with particular attention to issues of land, inter-tribal relations, and issues of identity as tied to land. In addition to exegetical study, readings of African and African American scholars will form the basis of much of this investigation. Course meets in GTU Library Conference Room.

JUSTICE AND RIGHTEOUSNESS (OT-4139)

Credits:3

CONCEPTS OF JUSTICE AND RIGHTEOUSNESS IN THE HEBREW BIBLE This course explores the topic of justice and righteousness in the Hebrew Bible. The focus will be on distinguishing different concepts within the Hebrew Bible (Deuteronomy and other legal texts; Wisdom and Psalms; Prophets; narrations) and connecting them with general Ancient Near Eastern ideas as well as with particular theologies of given writings. Fulfills SFTS capstone requirement. Format: seminar style. Evaluation method: classroom participation; classroom presentation; papers. [OT introduction]

WISDOM/WRITINGS (OT-4390)

Credits:3

A seminar for advanced students [MA, STL, MDiv] that explores the Wisdom books of the Hebrew Bible (especially Proverbs, Job, Ecclesiastes) and some Deuterocanonical Books (especially Ben Sira, Wisdom of Solomon, Baruch) and prose works (Esther, Judith, Tobit, Song of Songs, Additions to Daniel & Esther). Assessment: seminar participation, class presentation and research paper. [Faculty Consent required; 12 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

READING ISAIAH WITH HOPE/PEACE (OT-4422)

Credits:3

This course examines the book of Isaiah from the central Jewish and Christian frames of hope and peace. These major focii, hope and peace, present the opportunity to interrogate the total scope of the book of Isaiah as well as its constituent parts. Hope and peace will also assist in reading the book in the midst of contemporary challenges such globalization, war, terrorism, national security, ethnic identity and boundaries. Participants will spend time reflecting on theological appropriations of the book of Isaiah in the context of the book itself and various present day social settings. Participants will be assessed based upon discussions, written assignment, presentations, and project development. This course fulfills the Prophets requirement for PLTS students. Course offered jointly by PLTS and CDSP.

WOMEN & POWER IN JUDGES (OT-4606)

Credits:3

This seminar explores the questions in relation to women and the book of Judges. Topics of interest in this course includes: sexual politics and the roles of women in the ancient Mediterranean world, identifying and subverting patriarchy and androcentrism within biblical texts and the ancient world, literary analyses of biblical women as characters through the perspectives of power and powerlessness, and an examination of biblical women through various readers-response perspectives that emphasize the intersections between racial, ethnic, and gender identities. In addition, this course addresses how the text can be used as a source for women, men, and communities of faith that are dealing with issues of gender violence, gender disparities, and gendered theologies. This course places emphasis on approaches and perspectives that focus attention to people and causes that are on the margins, yet are equally valid for producing sound biblical scholarship. Participants will engage their readings of Judges in the context of real world situations. This course is co-taught by PhD student Diandra Chretain with a Newhall Award. [Introduction to Old Testament; 15 max enrollment; PIN code required; auditors with faculty permission]

INTRODUCTION TO THE OT (OT-8107)

Credits:3

Online version of OT-1070: This course offers a critical introduction to the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible. Students will learn about the ancient Near Eastern context of the OT/HB, the history of ancient Israel, the different parts and books within the OT/HB, the processes from oral original to canonical books, different streams of tradition (theologies) within the OT/HB, etc. Evaluation method: classroom participation, several short exams, three short papers. [Auditors with faculty permission]

CRITICAL INTRO: HEBREW BIBLE (OT-8114)

Credits:3

This course gives an overview of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, particularly the history, archaeology, societies, religions, and various cultural and political forces that shaped and influenced the preserved text. The geographic focus of the lectures will focus on the southern Levant (Holy Land) in its Near Eastern contexts, the temporal range will be approximately 2000-333 BCE. Themes will be stressed that echo PSR's core values, with special focus on leadership in its biblical forms, critical thinking, contexts (both ancient and modern), race/ethnicity, sexuality, and gender. Intended Audience: MDiv, MA. NOTE: This course is the ONLINE version of OT 1115 Critical Intro to Hebrew Bible. Only students taking the course as an online course should register using this course number; all others should register for OT 1115. This course meets asynchronously using Moodle (http://gtu.edu/library/students/moodle-help). High-speed internet connection required. (Occasional synchronous class meetings maybe scheduled; see syllabus for details.) [Auditors with Faculty Permission]

INTRODUCTION TO OT (OT-8174)

Credits:3

This course will provide a basic online introduction to the study and message of the OT. The successful student will have 1) acquired a socio-cultural and theological overview of the Old Testament with foci on basic content as well as critical issues and exegetical and hermeneutical methodologies; 2) developed a self-awareness concerning his/her own social location and its relationship to the reading, thinking, and doing of biblical, historical, and theological work.

INTRO TO THE OLD TESTAMENT (OT-8175)

Credits:3

This course provides a survey of the Hebrew Bible, focusing on the texts in their historical and literary contexts. Students will learn to read the texts from various perspectives and evaluate the notion of the literature as sacred texts both for ancient readers as well as contemporary faith communities. Evaluation will be based on written assignments and class presentations.

THEOLOGIES IN THE OT (OT-8475)

Credits:3

TOPICS OF THEOLOGICAL DISCUSSIONS IN THE OLD TESTAMENT/HEBREW BIBLE This course is about topics (like presence of God; revelation; monotheism; creation; history; humanity; good and evil; sin and redemption; election; covenant; land; king and messiah; justice and peace) that are crucial in the OT/Hebrew Bible. The goal is not to reconstruct the (one) theology of the OT/Hebrew Bible but, rather, to become aware of the diversity of theologies (plural!) mirrored in it and the differences between these theologies in crucial questions. This course is an intensive ONLINE course that meets asynchronously between 6/9/14-7/3/14 (4 weeks). As asynchronous course, it has not required meeting times. Each of the four weeks consists from 3 units, for which in average you each have to set aside about 10 hours (homework; online participation). In addition, at the end of the class, you are expected to write a 10 page paper, which is due by July 31, 2014. The course uses Moodle; high-speed internet connection required. Method of evaluation: online participation; final paper. Class runs from 6/9/14-7/3/14. [OT Introduction]

SITUATING BIBLE:CNTXTS/HSTRIES (OTNT-1700)

Credits:3

This course, the first of a year-long sequence, gives a critical overview of the Bible, particularly the history, archaeology, societies, religions, and various cultural and political forces that shaped and influenced the Hebrew Bible and New Testament. It will also introduce students to the historical critical methods, important for understanding historical matters related to the Bible. The geographic focus of the course will be on the regions of the Near East, the temporal range will be 1500 BCE-400 CE. The course will begin addressing issues of canon, text, and content before turning attention to the archaeology and history of the times of the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament. Having set the historical context, the course will move to introduce students to the historical methods of interpretation, with an emphasis on the Gospels and the Pentateuch, and end with the history of biblical interpretation.

THE BIBLE IN THE NEAR EAST: (OTNT-1708)

Credits:3

THE BIBLE IN THE NEAR EAST: 2000BCE-400CE This course is an overview of the history, archaeology, cultures, societies, and religions that shaped and influenced the Bible (both Hebrew Bible and New Testament). It will also pay attention to the process and politics of canonization.

THE BIBLE AND THE NEWSPAPER (OTNT-2001)

Credits:3

The Bible and the Newspaper: Poverty, Violence, War, and Public Policy...This is a new course that will focus on Hermeneutics, the Bible, and the daily news. Topics of interest will include war, Ebola, virus, racism, and violence. Specifically, we will spend time studying the Ferguson situation (and other similar incidents), the Ebola virus in Africa and beyond, school shootings, and religious liberty in the US. By the end of the course that successful student will have developed a systematic presentation for one or more of these categories that envisions new ways to shape the lively intersection between sacred texts and public policies. Course meets four Saturdays (2/7/15, 3/7/15, 4/4/15, and 5/2/15) from 9:00am-5:00pm at ABSW Crouch, 1st floor.

SOCIAL JUSTICE IN HEBREW BIBL (OTRS-1807)

Credits:3

This introductory course will provide a survey of Books in the Hebrew Bible whose themes focus on social justice issues; including Deuteronomy, the writing Prophets, Psalms, Proverbs, and Job. Evaluation will be based on several written assignment and participation in class discussion. This class is primarily designed for MDiv students and MAs in Biblical Studies and the MAST and CSST programs. We'll trace out some of the earliest developments in social justice in world history, and contextualize them with comparative materials from the ancient Middle East. Emphasis will be placed on understanding these social justice concepts in both their ancient and modern contexts.

OT DEATH MOURNING & AFTERLIFE (OTRS-2500)

Credits:1.5

Through textual, anthropological, and archaeological research methods this seminar investigates concepts of death, mortuary practices, mourning ritual, and ancestral / afterlife beliefs in the Hebrew Bible. Part I focuses on the Bronze & Early Iron Age communities that informed these texts and provides context. Part II examines the Biblical Hebrew texts from with this framework. Part III adds a modern lens as we explore ancestor veneration in contemporary San Francisco's Mission District. This course is dually designed to provide M.A. students sound biblical scholarship that recognizes the Hebrew Bible's first millennium context, and M.Div. students historic background to understand and preach these texts. UCB may students may cross-register for credit. Midterm: an excursion to the 2015 Day of the Dead celebration in the Mission followed by a short paper. Final: an 8-12 page research paper - OR - a sermon on one of the course texts. Course is taught by PhD student Alixx Ortiz- Roberts with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Aaron Brody. [Successful completion of an introductory Old Testament course or history of the ancient Near East / Palestine is helpful but not necessary]

PSALMS (OTSP-2503)

Credits:3

The Psalms have nourished the spiritual and theological life of the Christian and Jewish communities for centuries. Their vitality is manifest in liturgy/worship, in theological studies, in personal spirituality. This course will pursue such connections by studying psalms as part of the Old Testament and ways in which psalms impact the life of the early Christian writings in the New Testament. We will explore different ^types^ of psalms, moods of sadness and joy, hope and disappointment in them. Other literary questions, including their ^ordering^ in the Book of Psalms will contribute to our study. Course will explore spirituality of the Psalter by considering: relationship to individual and communal prayer, worship, music, and the Sunday lectionary, and history of Psalm reception in Jewish and Christian communities of faith. Course is designed primarily for ministry students (^praxis^ course for JST MDiv students). Lectures/discussions; midterm exams papers. [One course in Biblical Studies/Old Testament; Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

SPIRITUALITY OF PSALMS (OTSP-2513)

Credits:3

This course also seeks to understand the role of spirituality in Psalms, and the role of Psalms in spirituality. Thus, we will also consider the use of Psalms in individual and communal worship and devotion, in multiple traditions and throughout history, in a variety of media (text, song, art). While we will read the Psalms closely and critically, we will also focus on how the Psalms can be incorporated into a variety of ministry settings. Students will be evaluated mainly through written assignments, including a final research paper. Class structure will vary but will primarily combine lecture and discussion. This course is designed primarily for M.Div. Students but is open to anyone who is interested in the Psalms. [One course in Old Testament/Hebrew Bible or the equivalent; PIN code required; 25 max enrollment] NOTE: This Newhall course is taught by GTU PhD student Christina Fetherolf, under the supervision of John Endres.