Course Information

 

for A. Christian Spirituality Department


CHRISTIAN SPIRITUAL PRACTICES (SP-1001)

Credits:3

As interest in spirituality has increased in American culture, publishing houses reflect that interest, as do professional schools that offer programs incorporating spirituality, and churches are responding to growing demand for guidance in spiritual formation and practice. The aim of this course is to study Christian spiritual practices as engaged in and understood historically and in their present expressions. The course will contain a mixture of lecture, discussion, case presentations and studies, and experiential application, and will rest in the stance of contemplative listening. The intended audience is diverse, including seekers, Christian lay persons, seminarians (MDiv, MA/MTS, and DMin), and clergy. Students will be evaluated based on attendance and participation, completing assignments (including reflection papers, a journal, a comparative book review, and a research paper), and quality of reflection in written work. Course meets at Fisrt Presbyterian Church of Berkeley, 2407 Dana St, Room G208. [10 max enrollment]

SPRTUAL FORMATION FOR MINSTRY (SP-1002)

Credits:3

In this practicum style course students will engage spiritual formation both for personal appropriation as a spiritual leader and also for teaching practices in ministry. Students will be initiated into spiritual formation theory and practice through experiential exercises, small group interactions, and critical reflection. Selected spiritual practices from the Swedenborgian tradition will be explored in their historical contexts and examined critically for their potential use in personal and professional formation and in ministry. Developing students' teaching leadership for spiritually informed ministries will be a theme. Sessions will include lecture, small group work, and plenary discussion. A final project will be due within two weeks following conclusion of the intensive week. [Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded] Class meets daily, 1/23/16-1/27/16, 9:00am-5:00pm.

MEDITATION:THEORY & PRACTICE (SP-1145)

Credits:1.5

MEDITATION: THEORY AND PRACTICE Meditation has long been used to deepen religious and spiritual experience, and to quiet the mind for clarity and inner knowledge. This course is a practicum, an experiential exploration of the various forms and techniques of meditation and traditions. Buddhist, Taoist, Hindu, Jewish, Christian, Islamic, and non-religious viewpoints are included to broaden our practice, and acting as openings to interfaith (including atheists/ agnostics) dialogue and understanding. Explorations of mind will include concepts and practices of consciousness, awareness, mindfulness, and presence. Focus is given to the students' integration of meditation concepts and practice into their religious understanding and spiritual formation. Attention given to the value of meditation in developing a peaceful diverse world and enhancement of deep nonviolence toward all of life on earth. Class meets daily, 7/20/15- 7/24/15, from 1:30pm-5:30pm, in MUDD 100. NOTE: For registration, see www.psr.edu/summer.

ORIENTATION TO THEO EDUCATION (SP-1500)

Credits:1.5

This course is required of entering M.Div students. It will be conducted in seminar style, encouraging active discussion. We will explore disciplines of theological education as well as spiritual practices students might encounter. Emphasis is placed on the practice of academic writing. The class will work on one short term paper which will go through several drafts.

SACRED WALKS (SP-1510)

Credits:1

What is a 21st century pilgrimage and how is it different from a long distance hike or religious tourism? What are its privileges and politics? How do we prepare spiritually, physically, logistically? This courses uses the European Caminos to Santiago de Compostela as a reference for these questions (though not limited to these). As a course on walking, we will walk whenever possible. We meet five Saturdays during the semester; three will be 3-hour hikes/seminar in sites to be determined in class discussion. Participants must be fit enough to complete these walks. Bring a bag lunch. Course participants must commit to at least a 1 and a half hour walk & journal once a week, submitted online. This course is particularly helpful for those planning a Camino or other pilgrimage in the summer. SPRING 2018 FEB 3, 9am-12pm - INTRODUCTION FEB 17, 9am - 12pm WALK & SEMINAR MARCH 10, 9am-12pm WALK & SEMINAR Spring Break: March 26-30/ Good Friday, March 30/ Easter Sunday April 1 APRIL 7, 9am-12pm WALK & SEMINAR APRIL 21 9am-12pm FINAL MEETING Friday May 11, REFLECTION PROJECT/ PAPER DUE

ANGLICAN TRADITION AND LIFE (SP-1649)

Credits:3

This course will develop the student's ability to articulate the depth and breadth of Anglicanism as a living tradition in both English-speaking and non-Anglo contexts. It will touch on such areas as spirituality, history, theology, liturgy, the arts, and ethics, providing both knowledge of resources and participation in Anglican theological-spiritual discourse. Method: lecture, discussion, prayer. Evaluation: Class discussion; short papers; term paper. Intended audience: M.Div, MA/MTS, CAS/CTS. [Auditors with faculty permission]

END OF LIFE SPIRITUALITY (SP-2002)

Credits:1

In this class students will learn to work with people and families at the end of life, including spiritual care assessments, practical matters, prayers and blessings, bathing and other rituals, and burials/memorials. We will explore our current maps of the life and death process, our needs as human beings and spiritual beings in crisis, and the tools we have to offer. We will focus on the cultivation of skillful means for coping with these intense transitions, and prepare ourselves to serve others with these skills. SPRING 2018 Class meets Fridays, 4/13/2018-5/11/18, from 2:00pm to 5:00pm at JST 217.

ORTH SPIRITUALITY & THE BODY (SP-2501)

Credits:3

A certain Orthodox bishop, when asked to explain Orthodox spirituality, replies ^Orthodox spirituality is physical.^ He then goes on to explain how, when he was a young boy about to serve as an acolyte for the first time, his priest taught him bow to his knees while entering the altar. Thus, the young boy and future bishop learned the importance of uniting soul and body in whatever we do. This course will explore this Orthodox insistence on unity of action of soul and body. Starting with the theological underpinnings of the Incarnation of Christ and man as microcosm, we will then examine monastic and lay piety and the role of the five senses in Christian life and particularly in the Divine Liturgy. This course is designed as a forum for discussion, in which students dialogue with Chrysostom and each other, learning from their peers in a supportive atmosphere. Evaluation will be based on weekly written reflections, participation in classroom discussions, and one large or two smaller essays.

THOMAS MERTON (SP-2503)

Credits:3

2015 marks the 100th anniversary of Thomas Merton's birth! This seminar will explore Merton's writings through several "tracks" that will be running consecutively. First, we will follow Merton's life chronologically as presented in a summary of his journals. Second, we will read selections of Merton's writing that correspond to the time period under discussion. Third, we will read "New Seeds of Contemplation", one of Merton's books on spiritual practice, in small segments. Finally, in the latter part of the semester students will have the opportunity to make presentations on a topic of their choice. The goal of the class is to give students an opportunity to read and reflect on a wide variety of Merton's writing, including his spiritual writing, social critiques, letters, journals, and poetry. Evaluation based on class participation, two short papers, a presentation, and one long paper. Open to students in all programs. [12 max enrollment; PIN required; Auditors with Faculty permission]

SPIRITLTY OF FRANCIS DE SALES (SP-2505)

Credits:3

Beginning with a general survey of the life and work of Saint Francis de Sales (missionary, bishop, founder and doctor of the Church), students analyze the major themes of his spiritual teaching: 1)devotion and gentleness: two sides of Christian humanism; 2)meeting God in daily life; 3)means for progressing in the love of God. The special role of Saint Jane-Frances de Chantal is highlighted in synthesizing the impact of Salesian thought on the spirituality and pastoral life of the Church. Format: Lecture/discussion. Evaluation: Group work, reflection papers, class presentation.

BASICS OF SPIRITUAL DIRECTION (SP-2519)

Credits:3

THIS COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT IN KOREAN. This is an introductory course on spiritual direction for Korean Americans. Spiritual direction is a recently introduced spiritual practice for Korean American churches. This course will present various aspects of spiritual direction such as tradition, definition, prayer, discernment, cross-cultural issues, ethics, and its relationship with pastoral counseling. The class consists of theoretical discussions on each topic and practices with debriefing. This course is offered for Koreans and Korean Americans in their masters degree program.

IGNATIAN VISION & CULTURES (SP-2603)

Credits:3

This course offers in-depth studies of the relationship between spirituality and cultures. How one’s image and vision of God and of the world affect and influence the cultures which one lives and creates AND VICE VERSA. As second part, this course will explore the vision and cultures in the Ignatian tradition and Ignatian spirituality that are grounded in Ignatian discernment and how mission is understood and practiced. The course is organized as a seminar, and class participation is expected. Student evaluation consists of 2 short reflection papers (2 – 3 pages) coming out from individual reflection and group discussion, a presentation in class on your own ongoing “vision”, and a final research project (~ 10 pages). Reading knowledge of Spanish is advantageous but not required. [20 max enrollment; Auditors with Faculty permission]

FUNDMNTLS OF SPIRITUAL DIRECTN (SP-2680)

Credits:0

This course satisfies a core requirement for the diploma and certificate in the art of spiritual direction. Itinvites students to develop the basic attending, responding, assessing, and discernment skills necessary in the practice of spiritual direction. Participants will also explore the dynamics of direction sessions and become conversant with such issues as initial meetings with directees, psychological concerns in direction, special cases, etc. Students will learn about the professional dimensions and responsibilities, which accompany every spiritual direction relationship. Dates TBD.

SPIRITUALITY & SOCIAL CHANGE (SP-2811)

Credits:3

SPIRITUALITY & SOCIAL CHANGE: EXPLORING THE INTERSECTION THROUGH INTERCULTURAL DIALOGUE AND ACTION This course offers an opportunity for a community of learners to explore meeting points between Christian spirituality and movements for social change. The proposed curriculum seeks to engage knowledge from the lived experiences of all class members and supports action for justice as the primary educational outcome. The class will be structured based on transformative pedagogical ideas developed by the Highlander Research and Education Center, and the learning community itself will attempt to model transformative social change through our learning activities. We will focus on learning about and learning from each other, and we will design the course cooperatively. Assignments and the format of class sessions will depend on the learning community's course plan. This course is taught by PhD student Beth Anderson with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Elizabeth Liebert. [12 max enrollment]

WRITING AS HEALING MINISTRY (SP-2988)

Credits:1.5

Writing is an art form that belongs to every one of us. It is also a powerful tool for healing. In recent years, a growing body of research shows that the simple act of writing down thoughts and feelings helps people with chronic illness improve their health. But the healing power of writing extends well beyond physical illness. Writing also reduces stress, discharges complex emotions and helps us gain perspective. When we suffer pain or loss, writing about our feelings can help to relieve our burdens, establish a perspective, and cope more effectively with life's hardships. Writing helps us integrate our physical, emotional and spiritual well-being. It can be a kind of prayer-one in which you don't ask for anything, except to know your own experience and to make meaning of it. ^Writing as a Healing Ministry^ is designed to provide an overview of the field of therapeutic or healing writing for lay ministers, clergy, healthcare or helping professionals. In this intensive week-long course, we will explore how writing can heal ourselves and others. Class activities will include an overview of the research on therapeutic writing, review of several different writing methodologies used to help individuals heal from pain, suffering and trauma, small group discussion and individual writing exercises. NOTE: For registration & summer session policies, see www.psr.edu/summer. Class meets daily, 7/21/14-7/25/14, from 9:00am-1:00pm at MUDD 102. [9 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

DYNAMICS OF TRAUMA (SP-4055)

Credits:3

In this first course in the Certificate in Trauma and Spiritual Care, students will explore the basic dynamics of trauma from a variety of perspectives: sociological, psychological, psychiatric, neuroscience, relational, theological and spiritual. We will begin by exploring the great variety of trauma events, the demographics of trauma, related studies from the emerging field of traumatology. From the psychological and psychiatric fields we will identify trauma symptoms, and the concept of PTSD and Traumatic Loss. We will learn how to recognize the presence of trauma. Finally, we will explore the theological, spiritual and moral dimensions to trauma and the traumatized person, including the concept of “moral injury.” Along the way, we will touch on implications for the treatment and healing of traumatized persons, but a subsequent course in the certificate program will deal more directly with the dynamics of healing, recovery and treatment. We welcome to this class all who minister to and with traumatized persons. Classes will be held during 4 weekends: 9/7-8, 10/5-6, 11/2-3, 11/30-12/1. Fridays: 6-9pm, Saturdays: 9am-4pm. [Introduction to pastoral care or counseling]

CONTEMPLATIVE PRAYER (SP-4134)

Credits:3

This course will explore the development of contemplative prayer in the Western Christian tradition--both Roman Catholic and Protestant--through the works of Bernard of Clairvaux, John Ruusbroec, Teresa of Avila, Johann Arndt, Jeanne Guyon and Jonathan Edwards. Format: lecture, seminar; Evaluation: research paper and short issue papers. [12 max enrollment; Faculty written permission required; Auditors excluded]

CTSC SYSTEMC ISSUES OF TRAUMA (SP-4151)

Credits:3

COLLECTIVE TRAUMA, COLLECTIVE MEMORY: SYSTEMIC ISSUES OF TRAUMA Survivors of trauma can be caught in a relentless spiral in which distress in social relationships exacerbate trauma symptoms, and trauma symptoms exacerbate disconnected social relationships. This spiral then takes on a life of its own, becoming self-reinforcing. The communal resources that could be an aid for healing, are instead an avenue of danger. The goal for trauma care, therefore is not only to lessen the distress in survivors' lives, but also to create secure human resources that promote active and optimal adaptation to a world that contains distress. Using race as the central category for systemic issues that exacerbate collective trauma and collective memories of trauma, we will examine the traumatic reality of racism, sexism and classism in social systems. The hope is that we will uncover the roots of racial, gender, and class social injustices, such that social realities that create and reinforce collective trauma may be identified and eliminated and social connections with others as essential for the survival and stability of the collective human condition constructed. We will use arts, theology, history and philosophy to reflect on our own healing from and participation in racism, its interlocking social constructions, and its traumatizing social effects in order to attend to grief, make meaning, create ^new normals,^ and promote reorganization within multi-system collaborations in ways that are healthy for interlocking organizational systems and for all who live within them. The course is PASS/FAIL only. This 4000-level course is designed for the Masters student and may be used to fulfill an elective requirement as well as toward the Certificate in Trauma & Spiritual Care. Class meets Fridays,7:00pm-10:00pm, and Saturdays, 9:00am-4:30pm at SFTS. FALL 2017 Dates: September 22-23 October 20-21 November 17-18 December 8-9

DEVOUT & DIRECT IN DAILY LIFE (SP-4337)

Credits:3

Building on the spiritual legacy of Francis de Sales (bishop of Geneva 1602-1622) through a study of his major writings, correspondence and preaching, students delve into the themes of spiritual accompaniment, Christian friendship, and the spirituality of daily life, especially in the area of the relation between faith and life-- meeting God in the circumstances of one's every- day responsibilities, struggles, joys, hopes and fears. The special role of St. Jane de Chantal is highlighted in synthesizing and developing Salesian pastoral life and spiritual direction. Format: Lecture/seminar. Evaluation: Group work, research paper, class presentation. Intended audience: MDiv, CTS, MA/MTS, DMin (varying requirements).

SPECIAL TOPICS (SP-9100)

Credits:0

SPRING 2017 Section 1 SPIRITUAL PRACTICE GROUP - Prayer Through Poetry Participants will gather around various sacred themes or stories, sometimes seasonally-informed, and hear sacred scripture and contemporary poetry around that theme. An example might be a day in Advent reading the Magnificat and exploring Mary's response as told by the poets. Participants will be encouraged to "doodle" during the hour, writing or drawing thoughts, reflections, images or words that stand out to them. We will discuss the theologies, purpose, lenses and insights in the pieces we read. Required for MDiv, MTS, and CATS students. [5 max enrollment per section] Meets on Wednesdays at PLTS Giesy 1 from 8:30-9:30am as follows: 2/8, 2/15, 3/1, 3/15, 4/12, and 5/3. Section 2 SPIRITUAL PRACTICE GROUP - Spirituality and Music We will take a musical journey to spirituality, experiencing music from different eras and genres as an expression of and inspiration for spirituality, and as a wealth of resource for theology and ministry. Required for MDiv, MTS, and CATS students. [5 max enrollment per section] Meets on Wednesdays at PLTS, Stjema's Office, from 8:30-9:30am as follows: 2/8, 2/15, 3/1, 3/15, 4/12, and 5/3. Section 3 SPIRITUAL PRACTICE GROUP - Narrative Medicine: The Spiritual Practice of Storytelling and Storylistening Participants will participant in a close reading of one short story (fiction). We will read this story aloud, together, and in multiple parts. The story will serve as our launchpad for learning to tell our own stories and learning to listen deeply to others' stories. Required for CATS, MTS, and MDV students. [5 max enrollment] Meets on Wednesdays from 8:30-9:30am as follows: 2/8, 2/15, 3/1, 3/15, 4/12, and 5/3. FALL 2017 Section 1 SPG: WALKING THE WALK: A KINESTHETIC SPIRITUAL PRACTICE Each meeting we will hike together in a local park and/or urban oasis. Each hike will include reflection on and praying a Creation Psalm. Required for CATS, MTS, and MDV students. Meets on Wednesdays from 8:30-9:30am as follows: 9/13, 10/4, 10/18, 11/1, 11/15, 11/29. [6 max enrollment] Section 2 SPG: SPIRITUAL FORMATION IN THE CITY As members of the PLTS community, we pray, study, worship, reflect, read, and live in the city. In this group we will experience how not to take this ^for granted,^ by experiencing (in body and spirit) that all of these gifts happen in an urban context. As a practice we will reflect on encountering the divinity through the rewarding process of experiencing City Life in Berkeley, especially what public spaces have to offer (Public Libraries, Parks, University.) The group will meet at the Seminary, will walk around and explore different aspects of city life. Required for CATS, MTS, and MDV students. Meets on Wednesdays from 8:30-9:30am as follows: 9/13, 10/4, 10/18, 11/1, 11/15, 11/29. [6 max enrollment] Section 3 SPG: GOD THROUGH THE SENSES This group will explore the practice of knowing God through the bodily senses -- sight, hearing, taste, smell, touch. Christianity is a religion of incarnation, God enfleshed in matter and energy; God is within (as well as beyond) us and the rest of creation. Spiritual practices are to help us perceive this God, grow in intimacy with this God and one another, and live according to the Spirit of this God. The bodily senses are one pathway for doing so. In knowing God through the senses, we also will explore the faith claim that God created us in part so that life, love, and joy could be experienced and that one tremendous gift for experiencing them is the bodily senses. Required for CATS, MTS, and MDV students. Meets on Wednesdays from 8:30-9:30am as follows: 9/13, 10/4, 10/18, 11/1, 11/15, 11/29. [6 max enrollment] Section 4 SPG: SPIRITUALITY WITH LUTHER We will read Luther's Catechism as a spiritual exercise, per the reformer's own example and instructions. We will learn to use the Large Catechism as a tool for our personal spiritual formation, as a resource for our varied ministries, and for theological integration and exploration. In the process, we will explore the presence of the Holy Spirit in our daily lives. Recommended (while purchase not required): the new study edition of Luther's Catechism (Fortress Press, 2016), or other editions. Required for CATS, MTS, and MDV students. Meets on Wednesdays from 8:30-9:30am as follows: 9/13, 10/4, 10/18, 11/1, 11/15, 11/29. [6 max enrollment] SPRING 2018 Section 1 SPG: NARRATIVE MEDICINE: THE SPIRITUAL PRACTICE OF STORYTELLING AND STORYLISTENING Participants will participant in a close reading of one short story (fiction). We will read this story aloud, together, and in multiple parts. The story will serve as our launchpad for learning to tell our own stories and learning to listen deeply to others' stories. Required for CATS, MTS, and MDV students. Class meets on Wednesdays from 8:30am-9:30am as follows: 2/14, 2/28, 3/14, 4/4, 4/18, 5/2. Section 2 SPG: SPIRITUAL FORMATION IN THE CITY As members of the PLTS community, we pray, study, worship, reflect, read, and live in the city. In this group we will experience how not to take this ^for granted,^ by experiencing (in body and spirit) that all of these gifts happen in an urban context. As a practice we will reflect on encountering the divinity through the rewarding process of experiencing City Life in Berkeley, especially what public spaces have to offer (Public Libraries, Parks, University.) The group will meet at the Seminary, will walk around and explore different aspects of city life. Required for CATS, MTS, and MDV students. Class meets on Wednesdays from 8:30am-9:30am as follows: 2/14, 2/28, 3/14, 4/4, 4/18, 5/2. Section 3 SPG: GOD THROUGH THE SENSES This group will explore the practice of knowing God through the bodily senses -- sight, hearing, taste, smell, touch. Christianity is a religion of incarnation, God enfleshed in matter and energy; God is within (as well as beyond) us and the rest of creation. Spiritual practices are to help us perceive this God, grow in intimacy with this God and one another, and live according to the Spirit of this God. The bodily senses are one pathway for doing so. In knowing God through the senses, we also will explore the faith claim that God created us in part so that life, love, and joy could be experienced and that one tremendous gift for experiencing them is the bodily senses. Required for CATS, MTS, and MDV students. Class meets on Wednesdays from 8:30am-9:30am as follows: 2/14, 2/28, 3/14, 4/4, 4/18, 5/2. Section 4 SPG: SPIRITUALITY AND MUSIC We will take a musical journey to spirituality, experiencing music from different eras and genres as an expression of and inspiration for spirituality, and as a wealth of resource for theology and ministry. Required for CATS, MTS, and MDV students. Class meets on Wednesdays from 8:30am-9:30am as follows: 2/14, 2/28, 3/14, 4/4, 4/18, 5/2.

BIBLICAL SPIRIT/S OF SUFFERNG (SPBS-2010)

Credits:3

This course will dive deeply into three biblical texts, Esther, Lamentations, and Job, to consider how specific sets of religious subjects in the Hebrew Bible experience suffering and reflect on their faith and theology in contexts of extremity. We will then put these biblical pericopes into conversation with contemporary theologians and scholar-practitioners, like Gustavo Gutierrez, Soong-Chan Rah, Brenda Salter McNeil, Christianne MTroz, and Walter Brueggemann, to begin to explore biblical spiritualities of suffering. Through lecture, discussion, and student-led sessions on specific concerns of contemporary theodicy, we will consider the theological implications of God's silence in the midst of horrors depicted in Scripture and ways that people of faith can approach sacred narratives that show practices of faith and resistance in the face of violence, grief, racism, poverty, and injustice. This class is suitable as an introductory course for MDiv, MTS, or MA students or for intermediate students interested in biblical spirituality and theologies of suffering.

SWEDENBRGN BIBLICAL SPRTLTY (SPBS-4000)

Credits:3

Students will engage Swedenborgian hermeneutics using biblical themes as sites for theory and practice. Swedenborg's biblical spirituality will be framed from his own works and from the ensuing Swedenborgian tradition, and this tradition will be historically contextualized. Then, students will explore six canonical leitmotifs for constructive spirituality in the practice of ministry (sermons, Bible study groups, retreats). Sessions will include lecture, small group work, and plenary discussion. A final project will be due within two weeks following conclusion of the intensive week. Course will meet at Hillside Community Church, 1422 Navellier Street, El Cerrito, CA, 9am to 5pm daily, January 24-29, 2016. [Faculty consent required; Auditors excluded]

VIRTUE AS SPIRITUAL PRACTICE (SPCE-2610)

Credits:3

How do spiritual practices make us better people? Guided by the exploration and disciplined, community-assisted practice of virtue, this course will examine character and virtue through the lenses of philosophy, history, liberation spirituality, and psychology while prioritizing the student's own personal character growth. Students will consider virtue-based spiritual formation, what constitutes a virtue, methods for growing in virtue, and approaches to teaching virtue in ministerial contexts. We will study spiritual exemplars (from Christian and also non-Christian traditions) and their particular virtues and methods of cultivating virtue while practicing a variety of traditional and innovate methods of forming virtue. Students will keep a virtue journal; some class time will be spent in small groups for discussion and virtue-centric exercises. Format is lecture and discussion. Grade will be based on student presentation(s), final paper, and small group participation. This course is appropriate for MDiv and other master's students. This course is taught by PhD student Matthew Boswell with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Lisa Fullam. [15 max enrollment]

TEACHING PRTSTNT SPRTL EXRCSES (SPED-1084)

Credits:1.5

This course is an optional continuation of SPFT 1080. Teaching ^engaged spirituality^ practices in Protestant faith communities will be the focus. Special attention will be given to practices which support ministries of justice and compassion. Class meets the 2nd half of the semester. Intended audience: MDiv.

DIALOGUE AS SPIRITUAL PRACTICE (SPFT-1002)

Credits:1.5

Meaningful dialogue is a spiritual practice incorporating aspects of meditation and prayer, e.g., focused attention, patience, ego surrender, and cultivation of loving kindness. Furthermore, dialogue is a key element of cultural and organizational renewal. We explore the practices of Socrates, David Bohm, Martin Buber, and others. Dialogue in this context is an open-ended, spontaneous process enhancing creativity, understanding, and problem solving. The course is a five half-day "mini-retreat," where we engage in dialogue as our primary way of learning. Class meets daily, 7/22/13-7/26/13, from 1:30pm-5:30pm, at PSR.

SPRTL DISCIPLINES FOR LEADRSHP (SPFT-1080)

Credits:1.5

This required course for first semester PSR MDiv (1.5 credits) and CSSC (3.0 units)students initiates the professional leadership formation process by engaging students in experiential practices, small group interactions, and critical reflection. Selected spiritual practices from the Christian tradition will be explored in their social and historical contexts and examined critically for their role in contemporary leadership formation.

SPRTL DSCPLNS PROTSTNT COMMNTS (SPFT-1081)

Credits:1.5

This course is a continuation of SPFT 1080. It continues the exploration of Protestant spiritual traditions and practices by engaging students in experiential practices, small group interactions and critical reflection. Leadership formation for ministries of justice and compassion will be a theme. The course meets three hours a week for the last seven weeks of the semester. [SPFT 1080; Auditors excluded]

MINISTRY & SPIRITUALITY (SPFT-2513)

Credits:3

Spirituality and Ministry are profoundly related aspects of the Christian life. In this lecture/discussion course, we explore these disciplines separately and in relationship to one another across a wide variety of types and topics. These include: ministry on the margins, theological reflection on ministry, discernment and decision-making for ministry, and themes in personal and communal spiritualities. The course is scheduled to meet on a series of Saturdays at JST, from 9:00a to 3:00p on these dates: 9/7, 9/28, 10/12, 11/9 and 12/7. In addition, between on-site sessions students will be involved in several online exercises individually and in small groups. This schedule is meant to accommodate the work and study lives of busy students, but the topic also avails itself to a slower rhythm and pace associated with more contemplative processes.

AGING & RELIGIOUS LEADERSHIP (SPFT-8430)

Credits:3

Our dominant cultural paradigm ignores systems of privilege and difference in our society and encourages caring professionals to understand aging-related issues only as individuals' personal problems. This basic misapprehension lessens our ability to be effective in our ministries. We will bring pastoral and societal contexts of aging together and examine role loss; spiritual growth/development in later years; worship resources; successful faith-based programs; end-of-life issues. After successfully completing this course, students will be able to examine and understand aging-related issues both as individual circumstances, and as manifestations of the broader societal context in which these individual situations and problems are situated. [20 max enrollment; PIN code required; Auditors excluded]

INTERRELIGIOUS DIALOGUE: (SPHR-2620)

Credits:3

ST. IGNATIUS' SPIRITUAL EXERCISES AND THERAVADA BUDDHIST MEDITATION In this course, students will gain not only greater understanding but also experience transformation through interreligious dialogue. Focusing on the Ignatian Spiritual Exercises and Theravada Buddhist meditation, students will actively engage in textual dialogue, person-to- person dialogue, and practical or experiential dialogue in order to understand and cultivate the Christian tradition more deeply. In addition, students will be given guidance in how to practice interreligious dialogue and will find new insights about the Christians understanding of God, human beings, ultimate goals, and contemplation. They will also appreciate the challenges and opportunities of interreligious dialogue between two traditions. This course is designed primarily for Christians open to other religions who wish to gain a deeper understanding of dialogue and their own practices; Buddhists who want to experience interreligious dialogue can join the class with permission of faculty. Major learning strategies include: lecture, discussion, spiritual practices, journals or short reflection papers, student presentations, and a term paper. [12 max enrollment; PIN code required; Auditors with Faculty permission] This course is taught by PhD student Daesop (Daniel) Yi with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Dr. Elizabeth Liebert.

KOREAN SPIRITUALITY (SPHR-3705)

Credits:3

Introuctory seminar on history of religions in Korea and their influences on Christianity in Korea. Format: Seminar. Evaluation: Short papers, final project. This course is co-taught by PhD student Kang-Hack Lee with a Newhall Award. [15 max enrollment]

MEDIEVAL ENGLISH MYSTICS (SPHS-2549)

Credits:3

Using the lens of ^challenges and gifts,^ this seminar-style course will engage in an in-depth study of five fourteenth-century English mystics: Richard Rolle, the author of the Cloud of Unknowing, Walter Hilton, Julian of Norwich, and Margery Kempe. Together we will seek to understand the spiritualities of these writers within their historical contexts, including some elements of their lives and writing that make us uncomfortable or challenge us as 21st century readers. We will also explore the gifts these writers might offer to our own spiritualities today. Course materials will include an anthology of primary sources, podcasts, websites, and articles. Evaluation will be based on class participation, short reflection papers, a short research paper, and a group project leading the class in a spiritual exercise. This course is co-taught by PhD student Andrew Lee with a Newhall Award.

THEMES IN FRANCISCAN SPIRITLTY (SPHS-2653)

Credits:3

An examination of fundamental themes of Franciscan Spirituality: Incarnation; creation, image of God (in nature, in human person); Christocentrism; poverty; Mary and church; brother-sister relationships. Figures will include Francis, Clare, Bonaventure with some references to later mystics. Lecture and discussion. Evaluation by participation in class discussion, final research paper (10-15 pages). Intended audience: MDiv, MA/ MTS; STL candidates may upgrade.

BLACK CHURCH SPIRITUALITY (SPHS-3010)

Credits:3

The Black Church in the US and its history is an important element of American History. This course charts the history of the Black Church in the US beginning with its African legacies that survived the Transatlantic slave trade, through Jim Crow laws enacted after the Reconstruction period, including segregation and desegregation, through the Civil Rights era of the 1950s and 1960s, and into the twenty-first century. Popular misconception suggests that contemplation is absent from black spirituality, which is instead only to be expressive, full of moan, shout and frenzy. The focus of the course will be the distinctive contemplative experiences of the Black Church in the US, and its spirituality. Lectures and selected readings are designed to inform students cognitively and ground students experientially in Black Church traditions of spiritual practice. Opening devotions are intended to introduce and involve students in contemplative practices of the Black Church in the US. Field trips to local Black congregations will be offered for further immersion. Students will examine understandings of contemplation, and analyze the legacy and traditions of the Black Church as core to the broadly accepted and studied canon of contemplative spiritual practices. The intended audience includes MDiv, MA and other Masters students interested in Black Church, Africana, and Spirituality Studies. This course is taught by PhD student Ineda Adesanya with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Wendy Farley. [25 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

COMPARARATIVE CONTEMPLATIVES (SPHS-4200)

Credits:3

Contemplative theologies and practices in Christianity, Judaism, Sunni Islam, and Mahayana Buddhism. Particular emphasis on apophatic practices. Marguerite Porrette's Mirror of Simple Souls will be the focal point of our study, supplemented by Shantideva's Guide to the Bodhisattva's Way of Life and consideration of Christian (Pseudo-Dionysius, Nicholas of Cusa), Muslim (Muhammad ibn al-Ghazzali), and Jewish (Kabbalah) mystical writings. Presentations by distinguished guests. Inter-religious immersion experiences.

HISTORY OF XTN SPIRITUALITY (SPHS-5000)

Credits:3

This seminar explores primary readings in the classical sources of Christian spirituality from the early, medieval, early modern, and modern periods, as well as secondary readings on the sources and on historical methodology. Emphasis will be on various aspects of the mystical journey including biblical interpretation, asceticism, prayer, apophatic and cataphatic theologies, action/contemplation, visions, personal and social transformation, and union with God. By the end of the course, students will have gained a more detailed knowledge of a select number of topics within the history of Christian spirituality, and should have developed the ability to handle historical material for research projects in the same field. Weekly reflections, a presentation, and a final research paper of 20-25 pages. Primarily intended for PhD, STL, STD, and DMin students but open to advanced masters students with the permission of the instructor.

INTRO TO COMPARATVE MYSTICISM (SPHS-8100)

Credits:3

This course offers an overview of the field of comparative mysticism and its methodological foundations that will include a study of readings from representative figures in the history of mystical traditions both West and East. We will explore the principal schools of critical theory, including contextualist, perennialist/neo-perennialist, textual, feminist, psychological/participatory, and comparative perspectives, and work through the major issues in play and at stake in the phenomenon and/or claims of mystical experience in both historical and contemporary contexts. Every session will include primary and secondary sources to frame the week's discussion. Emics and Etics alike are welcomed. This ONLINE course meets asynchronously using Moodle. It has no required meeting times. High-speed internet connection required. See http://moodle.gtu.edu/mod/resource/view.php?id=227 17 for full technology requirements. Intended audience: MA, MDiv, MTS.

SPRTLTY OF PROTSTNT MYSTICISM (SPHS-8486)

Credits:3

Protestant history is rich with theologies and practices of transformative religious experience that constitute a broadly conceived "Protestant mysticism." After laying a foundation of critical theory on mysticism and religious experience and on interpretive reading of texts, this course will engage the social history, philosophy, practice, and cultural reception of such currents as the radical Reformation(s), Pietism and Romanticism in the mainline traditions, Theosophy, Transcendentalism, New Thought, spiritual poetry, and the rise of a distinctive women's spirituality. Focus will be both on entering sympathetically and critiquing varieties of extraordinary Protestant experiences and practices. Lecture/Seminar. Class presentations; research paper (M.Div. students have option of semester journal instead). Two sections: residential and online. Intended audience: MDiv, MTS, MA. NOTE: This course is the ONLINE version of SPHS 4086, Spirituality of Protestant Mysticism. Only students taking the couse as an online course should register using this course number; all others should register for SPHS 4086.

PSYCHOLOGY OF SPIRITUAL LIFE (SPPS-2170)

Credits:1

FALL 2017 SECTION 01 PSYCHOLOGY OF SPIRITUAL LIFE: UNDERSTANDING RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE This one credit course, first in the sequence of modules on the Psychology of Spiritual Life, focuses on religious and spiritual aspects of human subjectivity, theoretical aspects of the problem of religious experience, and the methods and practices leading to such experience. This deeply intimate dimension of practical theology will be explored through the study of traditional texts, and through student's self-reflection on their own experience. The course examines first-person authority both in contexts of confidentiality, and with regard to the social significance and health-related importance of subjectively lived religious experience. Class meets Wednesdays: 9/6, 9/13, 9/20, & 9/27/2017; from 6:10pm to 9:00pm. SECTION 02 PSYCHOLOGY OF SPIRITUAL LIFE: INCARNATION AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT In this one-credit course, second in the sequence of modules on the Psychology of Spiritual Life, students will review the "state and stage" psychologies of human development in world religions. A special attention will be paid to the concepts of incarnation (Christianity) and the Perfect Man (in Islam) as prerequisites to ideas related to human psychospiritual development, and to the modes of embodiment in the traditions such as Kundalini Tantra. The course will show how cultural formations of the self, the modes of spiritual introspection, and the models of human development come together to form a wholistic soteriology. As a part of this study, students will be guided through the contemplative practices and spiritual tools for psychological and physical health. Class meets Wednesdays: 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, & 11/1/2017; from 6:10pm to 9:00pm. SECTION 03 PSYCHOLOGY OF SPIRITUAL LIFE: CONTEMPORARY PSYCHOLOGIES This one-credit course, third in the sequence of modules on the Psychology of Spiritual Life, will include empirical research and theory on religious and spiritual behavior and transformation from contemporary psychology. The historical dimension in this class will establish connections between psychologies of spirituality, and the religious psychologies at their source. A spiritual formation project will help students experience a hands-on activity to examine their own spiritual formation and development. The topics include an overview of scientific psychological approach to spirituality and religiosity, advances in psychology of meditation and prayer, and Jung's, Assagioli's, and transpersonal psychological approaches. Class meets Wednesdays: 11/8, 11/15, 11/29, & 12/6/2017; from 6:10pm to 9:00pm.

SPRTL FORMATION & PSTRL CARE (SPPS-2386)

Credits:3

This course is designed to encourage students to engage in a thoughtful examination of the nature of pastoral care through the framework of spiritual formation. Through capturing principles of spiritual formation and committing to spiritual practices as a lifelong pattern, students will become aware of God, themselves, and others at work in their lives (seminary and ministry settings) and become more effective spiritual directors and pastoral caregivers. Students will be encouraged to engage in a practicum, with an emphasis on the implications for spiritual formation (contemplative listening, examen, and prayer) and pastoral care (effective listening, awareness of cultural differences, and self- care)--all in the context of the community of faith. This course will be taught in Korean. [12 max enrollment; PIN code required; Auditors with Faculty permission]

WOMEN'S SPIRITUAL QUEST (SPPS-2526)

Credits:3

This seminar will engage women in a process of reflection on their experience from the perspectives of spirituality, psychology, and the arts. We will consider women's religious experience; relationships; personal/social transformation; the body; nature. Class will include feminist readings, written reflections, discussion, and ritual. Format: Seminar. Evaluation: Informed class participation, reflection papers. [Faculty Consent required; 12 max enrollment; Auditors with Faculty permission]

SPIRITUALITY & HEALING (SPPS-4318)

Credits:3

BODY, NATURE, HEALING AND SPIRITUALITY This course unfolds at the intersection of spirituality, medicine, issues of pastoral care and political theology. Utilizing a modified seminar format, the discourse brings together all different aspects that are involved in the process of healing. The discourse on healing in this seminar is guided by the insights of integrative medicine and feminist hermeneutics, eco-spirituality and social contexts. The theoretical analysis will be developed in close relationship with the experience at site visits and through encounters with experts in the dynamics of healing and health. The seminar works with the underlying thesis that any human vocation is born out of ones own healing and the call to participate in the healing of others. Consequently, the goal of the seminar will be to deepen our own vocation in understanding the multi-layered process of healing that connects human experience and academic research. It is a comprehension of healing that leads into the wholeness and holiness of life. The seminar will meet on campus, with the exception of one site visit to an urban farm and a day workshop at Commonweal, Bolinas, CA , (Friday of reading week). Because of the site-visit and workshop day: Last day of seminar will be May 10th, 2018. The course is primarily intended for advanced Students. [Faculty Consent required; 15 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

BODY NATURE HEALING & SPRTY (SPPS-4400)

Credits:3

This course unfolds at the intersection of spirituality, integrative medicine, pastoral care and issues of fundamental theology. Utilizing a modified seminar format, it brings into dialogue political awareness, eco-spirituality and feministhermeneutics addressing questions of health and healing. Health and healing is understood individually and communal. The theoretical analysis will be developed in close relationship with the experience at site visits to urban farming and spirituality centers focusing on health and healing , and through encounters with experts in the area of integrative medicine and healing. (see www.commonweal.org )We will work from theologies of creation, revelation and baptism to develop an understanding of life as sacred and consecrated integrating body and health, rather than starting with traditional theologies of religious life and lay consecration, The goal of the seminar will be to develop theological categories that grow out of human experience of need for healing and academic research into the wholeness and holiness of life. The seminar will meet bi-weekly and includes a full day immersion on October 30th . This course is primarily intended for MDiv, MA, and MTS, although STL, ThM, STD and PhD students are very much invited to integrate the course with advanced requirements that meet their specific research interests [PIN code required; 15 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

CTSC TRAUMA CARE RESILIENCY (SPPS-4460)

Credits:3

Trauma Care is provided under unique pressures: extreme uncertainty, fear/anxiety, real threat, complexity, time sensitive, political pressure, and public scrutiny in a high consequence environment. Preparation of trauma care givers for this challenge has focused on related knowledge and technical care-giving skills. Yet, researchers have found that competencies for trauma care are largely dimensions of emotional intelligence (EQ). This trauma care course applies the principles of transformative learning to foster EQ growth. The approach requires sufficient time for implicit learning to occur, space for self-reflection and questioning one’s own assumptions, and an environment which supports, confronts and clarifies. In this class, students will learn critical care competencies for trauma care giving including self-awareness, self-management and impulse control, empathy and the ability to attune to others, flexibility, creativity, decision-making and problem-solving, and the ability to engage and inspire others. This course meets at SFTS in San Anselmo for four intensive weekends during the fall semester. Classes will be held during 4 weekends: 9/14-15, 10/12-13, 11/9-10, 12/14-15. Fridays: 6-9pm, Saturdays: 9am-4pm. Please visit www.sfts.edu for more information. [20 max enrollment]

PRAYERS OF THE HEART (SPPT-2010)

Credits:3

The course introduces students to the Prayer of the Heart, often referred to as the Jesus Prayer, and various other spiritual disciplines and practices related to this ancient art. Students will examine the historical development, prominent personalities of the ^hesychastic tradition^, phrases and expressions associated with the discipline, theological concepts related to the practice, as well as metaphysical concepts. Expressions such as ^the incomprehensible God, theosis, purity, emptiness, inner being, and spiritual guide^ will be studied, as they relate to the Prayer of the Heart. Psychological aspects which relate to prayer disciplines will be included, including introspection and revelation. While emphasis will be given to the Eastern Orthodox understanding of the Prayer of the Heart and its development, students will also examine ^the mystical experience^ in other traditions, including Gnosticism, Neoplatonism, Merkava and Sufism. The course work will include various readings from the Patristic tradition, introspective practice assignments, self-reflection, and journaling. Reading of the required materials is necessary for class discussion and participation. A ten to fifteen page paper will be required at the end of the course.

THURMAN SPIRITUAL DISCIPLINES (SPRS-2008)

Credits:1.5

HOWARD THURMAN: DISCIPLINES OF THE SPIRIT Howard Thurman was a 20th century religious leader and thinker whose prophetic vision and quiet mentorship were instrumental to Martin Luther King Jr. and many others in the struggle for freedom and justice. Thurman's text, Disciplines of the Spirit, explores subjects central to spiritual growth and maturity: commitment, suffering, prayer, reconciliation. Through readings, discussion, audio and video resources we will examine the relevance and practical applications of the ideas presented for each participant's life, work, and deepening spiritual journey. Course meets daily, 7/13/15-7/17/15, from 1:30pm-5:30pm, at MUDD 103. NOTE: For registration & summer session policies, see www.psr.edu/summer.

ENGAGED SWEDENBORGIAN SPRTLTY (SPRS-2050)

Credits:3

This course explores horizons of the lived experience in a committed Swedenborgian faith practice and appropriates multi-disciplinary resources in Swedenborgian spirituality for personal practice and social engagement. Beginning with a review of core concepts in Swedenborgian spirituality and metaphysics, the sequence of sessions will investigate various systems of spiritual practice in the Swedenborgian tradition and shape discourse for responding to such current cultural challenges such as social justice, the environmental crisis, the ^New Atheism,^ theodicy, pluralism, and the consumerist culture. [Faculty Consent required]

SOURCES:SEX-POSITIVE SPIRITLTY (SPRS-2402)

Credits:3

How do we build a healthy sense of sexuality as individuals and as communities of faith? In this class, we will use several selected texts, images, and other art forms to consider the question of developing a sex-positive spirituality. The course will examine materials from a range of cultures and time periods that explore the connections between sexuality and spirituality, focusing primarily on Christian and humanist sources. After consideration of the materials, the class will then go on to develop practical ways in which these could be used by both individuals and communities of faith to further their own understandings of an embodied and sex-positive spirituality. We will look at personal devotions, physical prayer practices, worship, small group study and outreach as they could be embodied in a sex-positive community or the life of an individual. This course is offered by PSR.

SPRTLTY/NONVLNT SOCL TRNSFRMTN (SPRS-4024)

Credits:3

This course will explore the quests of Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., Dorothy Day and Cesar Chavez for social transformation through nonviolence. Critical to the course will be an emphasis on the connection between spirituality and social action. What were the influences, e.g., Thoreau, Tolstoy, DuBois, that helped shape the zeitgeist of their times? How were strategies determined and employed? What is essential to an effective nonviolent campaign? What were the faith foundations of these extraordinary leaders? What were their relationships to their communities? How did they manage to keep their resolve in times of disappointments? These are some of the questions the course will explore. Limited Skype/virtual attendance allowed. [Faculty Consent required; 14 max enrollment; Auditors excluded] ATTN: This course is HYBRID (Residential with Skype participation).

SWDNBRG & CONTEMP SPRTUALITY (SPST-2970)

Credits:3

This course will put Swedenborgian ideas and theology into dialog with a variety of currently vibrant spirituality practices and movements that embody themes resonant with both the history and potentiality of Swedenborgianism. Explorations of social justice, deep psychology, esotericism, various spiritual practices East and West, and cultural poetics will be included. Sessions will involve some lecture and presentation, seminar-style discussions, and some practice. Bias will be towards effective appropriations for practice in ministry. Final research paper or pastoral project. Class meets weekdays, 1/20/14- 1/24/14, from 9am-5pm in MUDD 101.