Course Information

 

for To Be Determined Department


BASIC GREEK I (BS-1002)

Credits:3

Introduction to basic grammar and vocabulary needed to begin reading biblical Greek. This course or the equivalent is a prerequisite for Basic Greek II, the intensive course given during January Intersession.

BASIC GREEK I (BS-1002)

Credits:3

Introduction to basic grammar and vocabulary needed to begin reading biblical Greek. This course or the equivalent is a prerequisite for Basic Greek II, the intensive course given during January Intersession.

BASIC GREEK II (BS-1003)

Credits:3

Intensive introduction to working with the Greek text of the NT; assumes familiarity with the Greek alphabet and some basic volcabulary and grammatical concepts. Class dates TBD at SFTS.

BASIC GREEK II (BS-1003)

Credits:3

ELEMENTS OF NT GREEK (BS-1010)

Credits:3

SUMMER 2019 This course offers a one-semester introduction to New Testament Greek, including an overview of grammar, syntThis course offers a brief introduction to the Hellenistic (Koine) Greek language as found in the New Testament. The emphasis is on learning the basic features of New Testament Greek, making use of exegetical tools, and being able to use Greek for practical purposes, such as preaching and teaching, in the context of ministry. Evaluation: quizzes, exams, short exegesis assignments, classroom participation. Intended audience: MDiv students. Course meets weekdays, 6/17/19-6/28/19, from 2pm-5:45pm at CDSP. SPRING 2020 This course offers a one-semester introduction to New Testament Greek, including an overview of grammar, syntax and exegetical resources. Evaluation: quizzes, exams, short exegesis assignments, classroom participation. Intended audience: MDiv.

NT GREEK I: AN INTRODUCTION (BS-1020)

Credits:3

The first part of a two-semester course introducing the skills required to read and interpret New Testament texts in the original Greek. Basic and intermediate grammar and vocabulary on the focus, with an emphasis on acquiring the tools to sight-read texts. Grades will be based on class participation, quizzes, and midterm and final exams. This course is taught by PhD student Laura Jean Torgerson with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Uriah Kim.

NT GREEK II: AN INTRODUCTION (BS-1021)

Credits:3

The second part of a two-semester course introducing the skills required to read and interpret NT texts in Greek. Basic and intermediate grammar and vocabulary are the focus. Grades will be based on weekly assignments, quizes, and two exams. Course taught by PhD student Laura Jean Torgerson with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Uriah Kim.

ECCLESIASTICAL LATIN I (BS-1036)

Credits:3

This first half of a year's course aimed at preparing students to read (with a dictionary) Latin from Vulgate to recent Vatican documents. No prerequisites except rediness to come to class and study two/three hors in preparation. Daily recitation,occasional quizzes, midterm and final. Text: J.F. Collins, ^A Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin^ (CUA Press).

ECCLESIASTICAL LATIN I (BS-1036)

Credits:3

This first half of a year's course aimed at preparing students to read (with a dictionary) Latin from Vulgate to recent Vatican documents. No prerequisites except rediness to come to class and study two/three hors in preparation. Daily recitation,occasional quizzes, midterm and final. Text: J.F. Collins, ^A Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin^ (CUA Press).

ECCLESIASTICAL LATIN II (BS-1037)

Credits:3

A continuation of Ecclesiastical Latin I. Same text, same requirements. My hope is to finish the Collins Text before the end of the term and have time for reading of real texts from Bible and Christian Latin authors such as Augustine and Aquinas.

LATIN I & II: INTENSIVE STUDY (BS-1042)

Credits:6

This six week course (June 10- July 19) at JST covers two semesters of Latin. The course offers an introduction to the grammar and syntax of Latin. The goal is to learn Classical and Medieval Latin well enough by the end of Semester II to read accurately, precisely, and without extensive help. Exercises and readings are drawn from original texts of Classical and Medieval authors. There is strong emphasis on etymology, vocabulary, and comparative grammar. The three paperback textbooks are Wheelock's Latin, 7th edition (2011); Workbook for Wheelock's Latin by Paul Comeau and Richard LaFleur (2000); and Thirty-Eight Latin Stories Designed to Accompany Wheelock's Latin by Anne Groton and James May (2004). Grades for each semester are made up of four components: class participation including regular quizzes, written exercises, tests every four chapters (of 40 chapters overall), and a cumulative exam at the end of the semester. The course fulfills the Latin requirement for the JST or Boston College School of Theology & Ministry STL degree. Professor Stephanie Dixon is happy to answer questions about the course. Class meets weekdays, 6/10/2019-7/19/2019, from 9:00am-12:00pm, at JST 216.

BIBLICAL HEBREW (BS-1110)

Credits:3

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a working knowledge of Biblical (Classical) Hebrew; by the end of the course, the student will be able to read any passage of narrative in the Hebrew Bible with the aid of a lexicon (dictionary). The ability to reach this goal is dependent upon three primary areas of comprehension: 1) Knowledge of the Hebrew writing system (consonants and vowel points), 2) Knowledge of Hebrew grammar and basic syntax, and 3) Knowledge of Hebrew vocabulary

BASIC HEBREW I (BS-1120)

Credits:3

An introduction to the basic phonology and morphology of biblical Hebrew. This course or the equivalent is a prerequisite for Basic Hebrew II, the intensive course given in January Intersession.

BASIC HEBREW I (BS-1120)

Credits:3

An introduction to the basic phonology and morphology of biblical Hebrew. This course or the equivalent is a prerequisite for Basic Hebrew II, the intensive course given in January Intersession.

BASIC HEBREW II (BS-1121)

Credits:3

BASIC HEBREW II (BS-1121)

Credits:3

The second (intensive) half of a course aimed at enabling students to achieve reading knowledge of biblical Hebrew. Class meets weekdays, 1/7/2019-2/1/2019, from 9:00am-1:00pm, at SFTS. [BS1120 or equivalent]

ELEMENTARY BIBLICAL HEBREW I (BS-1127)

Credits:3

This is the first half of a year-long course introducing the basic grammar of biblical Hebrew. The course focuses on the basics of phonology (sounds), morphology (forms), and syntax (word order and function) for biblical Hebrew. The primary purpose of this course is to establish a foundational understanding of biblical Hebrew for students pursuing further study of the language. Issues of exegesis and interpretation will be discussed where appropriate, but the main focus of this course will be learning the grammar of biblical Hebrew. [20 max enrollment] NOTE: This course is taught by GTU PhD student Eric Sias with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Uriah Kim.

ELEMENTARY BIBLICAL HEBREW II (BS-1128)

Credits:3

This is the second half of a year long course introducing the basic grammar of biblical Hebrew. The course focuses on the basics of phonology (sounds), morphology (forms), and syntax (word order and function) for biblical Hebrew. The primary purpose of this course is to establish a foundational understanding of biblical Hebrew for students pursuing further study of the language. Issues of exegesis and interpretation will be discussed where appropriate, but the main focus of this course will be learning the grammar of biblical Hebrew. [BS 1127 or equivalent; 20 max enrollment] NOTE: This course is taught by GTU PhD student Eric Sias with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Uriah Kim.

INTRO TO BIBLICAL GREEK (BS-1145)

Credits:1.5

This course designed to provide students with the basic linguistic tools to approach the Greek New Testament. This course focuses on vocabulary, grammar, and short translations. The emphasis is on becoming familiar with the basic grammatical structure of Koine Greek. [15 max enrollment]

RHETORICAL USE OF TEXTS (BS-1200)

Credits:3

This course is taught by Sharon Jacob. This course will introduce students to methodologies of interpretation of sacred texts. Focus will be placed on various texts of the Hebrew Bible and New Testament, but will include comparative texts from other sacred traditions (ancient Near Eastern, Mediterranean, and Hindu). Methods explored may include literary criticism, text criticism, and source criticism, material cultural approaches, arts and religion approaches, postcolonial, and critical race/ethnicity methods. Assignments will include several reflection papers. Assessment will be based on those papers and class participation and class presentations. This course is available for 3 units.

USING BIBLICAL LANGUAGES (BS-1250)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to the fundamental skills of biblical interpretation including basic Greek and Hebrew analysis of biblical texts, the use of key Hebrew and Greek grammatical and lexical aids in both print and electronic resources. Students will also be introduced to basic linguistic theory and a wide range of methods of biblical criticism. Required course for MDiv students. This course will be taught in Spring 2019 by PhD student Eric Sias with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of LeAnn Flesher.

INTERMEDIATE HEBREW II (BS-2003)

Credits:3

Students in the course will read selected texts in prose and some in poetry toward the end of semester. It will give some attention to the critical apparatus of BHS and some textual witnesses from other manuscripts. Attention given also to oral reading of the texts. Assessment by regular class participation and by two examinations. This course is designed for those students in any program in the GTU consortium with at minimum one year of Hebrew and will be especially relevant to those students in the MABL program and doctoral students in Biblical Studies.

INTERMEDIATE HEBREW (BS-2007)

Credits:3

The goals of this course are: to review the grammar (morphology and syntax) learned in first year; to increase vocabulary knowledge; to introduce students to prose readings from the Hebrew Bible (especially from narrative texts). Prerequisites: 2 semesters of elementary Hebrew

INTERMEDIATE GREEK I (BS-2008)

Credits:3

This course is designed to develop proficiency in reading and translating New Testament Greek. For that purpose, it includes a revision of some elements of verb morphology, verbal aspect (tenses) and grammar. It nevertheless mostly consists in translating and analyzing sections of Luke, Acts and some letters from the Pauline corpus, paying special attention to syntax. The course also introduces the student to the usage of the critical apparatus of NA28. [Two semesters of Greek or equivalent; 20 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

EXEGESIS WORKSHOP: GREEK (BS-2245)

Credits:1

This course is designed to apply the basic linguistic tools learned in Biblical Greek to the task of interpreting the biblical text in the context of preaching. This course focuses on the text selected in Biblical Preaching. The emphasis is on understanding the nuances of approaching the text in its original language with the purpose of making it available to a worshipping audience. Prerequisite: BS-1145 Introduction to Biblical Greek. Concurrent: HM-2245 Biblical Preaching. [30 max enrollment]

THE GOSPEL OF JOHN (BS-2251)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to 1) the content of the Gospel of John, including a brief comparison with the Synoptic Gospels; 2) its genre and the various literary styles used to convey the message of the Gospel of John; 3) traditional introductory issues, e.g., authorship, date, background, structure, etc.; and 4) various methods appropriate to the study of this Gospel. Because this is a text-based class, primary attention will be given to the analysis of the text, while secondary, but critical, attention will be given to the first century historical context. The format of the course will be lecture, exegetical work in class, and class discussion. Students are expected to read course material for the day in advance of the class and be prepared to take part in the discussion. Discussion participation will focus on the assigned texts or topics of the Fourth Gospel for that day. Evaluation of the student’s progress will be based on two objective/essay exams and one ten (10) page paper. Prompts will be given in class for the paper. [Auditors with faculty permission] Class meets Wednesdays, 7:10pm-9:40pm, at the First Presbyterian Church of Berkeley, 2407 Dana St.

ARCHEOLOGY OF THE LANDS OF THE BIBLE (BS-2603)

Credits:3

This course will examine the archaeology of the lands of the bible from prehistory through the Roman period. Particular attention will be paid to questions of what we can learn from material culture and materiality and how that informs us about the cultures portrayed in the bible and their religious and social transformations over various time periods. Themes will include reconstructing ancient societies based on archaeology, and what insights archaeology can give us with regards to religion, economics, and empires. This course will provide a solid background for the summer 2020 immersion course in Israel, excavating at Tel Akko an ancient harbor city on the Mediterranean, home to Canaanites and Phoenicians. Evaluation will be based on 3 reflection papers and class participation

SHADOW OF EMPIRE: JESUS AND EMPIRE (BS-3600)

Credits:3

THE END OF THE WORLD (BS-3831)

Credits:3

MARGINS, SPEAK (BS-3900)

Credits:3

This course is a seminar on global hermeneutics and the Bible. We will concentrate on the study and critique of particular interpretations of the New Testament coming from marginalized communities that have at one time or another felt disenfranchised, powerless, and voiceless. Such communities take it upon themselves to resist the dominant interpretations and in doing so they begin to create a space in which their voices can be heard and empowered. Special attention will be given to critical approaches, issues of identity, colonialism and resistance, and the ideological spectrum between the margins and the center. In so doing, this course serves the stated program goal of helping students attend to “the continuing importance and practice of interpretation of texts and their communities in history and culture.” During the semester, we will read and study biblical texts using different perspectives within a postmodern ideological framework. Under this postmodern lens, all interpretations of the biblical text -- whether historical, theological, literary or of any other kind; and whether presented by the instructor or the students -- are partial and non-universal readings. All real readers, flesh-and-blood readers like us, read subjectively and partially.

ADVANCED GREEK (BS-4014)

Credits:3

THE SYMPOSIUM: This course will read selected portions of Plato's Symposium, which is one of the best known prose texts in Attic Greek. The class will translate the text and discuss its grammatical features focusing on the syntax of each sentence and morphology of the vocabulary. Pertinent philosophical ideas of Plato will also be discussed as they shed light on the linguistic features of the given text.

ADVANCED GREEK: PLATO'S PHAEDO (BS-4015)

Credits:3

BEFRIENDING THE BIBLE (BS-4072)

Credits:3

This course is designed to serve as an introduction to the Bible for persons who are curious about biblical literature but who do not identify any given canon as authoritative for their spiritual practice. It is suitable for candidates for ordained UU ministry, non-Christian religious progressives, seekers, and skeptics. Participants will learn the origins, development, and content of Israelite/Jewish and Christian texts and will identify both theological and academic methods of interpretation. Utilizing the metaphor of "befriending" the Bible, students will explore how these scriptures have both supported and hindered emancipatory social change, and will consider methods of engaging this complex anthology in their personal lives and spiritual communities. Course meets daily, 1/21/20-1/25/20, from 9am-5pm at SKSM. Relevant for SKSM Thresholds 1, 3, and 6; MFC Competency 3. [20 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

DEAD SEA SCROLLS & SCRIPTURES (BS-4430)

Credits:3

Survey of the Dead Sea Scrolls (DSS), their discovery, archaeology and publication. Contents will include: sectarian writings, pseudepigrapha, apocrypha and biblical texts found in the Qumran `library'. Special focus on Jewish interpretations of Scriptures and their significance for understanding Judaism of the Second Temple / New Testament eras. Lecture / seminar format; student presentations/ book review/ research paper; intended for Advanced Students (M.A., S.T.L., PhD, ThD, STD); texts read in English (special sessions for students who read Hebrew). [Courses in OT and NT; Faculty Consent required; 15 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

QUMRAN LITERATURE (BS-5000)

Credits:3

Students in this advanced seminar will study a selection of the written remains of Qumran, reading selections from them in Hebrew. By end of course participants will demonstrate: a broad acquaintance with written Qumran texts; knowledge of their relevance for understanding biblical texts; facility in reading Hebrew (or Aramaic) textual remains, grasping the significance of their publication information, dealing with lacunae, preparing an adequate translation and commentary on a chosen text; ability to produce a critical study of a scroll text / or a topic within the wider field of Qumran studies. [Advanced status in biblical studies; Hebrew reading at upper intermediate level; Faculty Consent required; Auditors with faculty permission]

TEXTS AND METHODS (BS-6005)

Credits:3

BALDWIN, BIBLE & SOCIAL JUSTC (BS-8260)

Credits:3

James Baldwin's biblical canon in ^Go Tell It on the Mountain^ and ^The Fire Next Time^ will be explored to identify his use of OT/NT texts to carve out a unique expression of social justice. Baldwin's texts, including texts to be selected by students, will help each participant to develop their own Baldwinian applied justice portfolio.

RITUAL STUDIES IN HINDUISM (BSHR-4201)

Credits:3

HINDU RITUALS AND HYMNS FOR PURIFICATION, BALANCE, HEALING AND SPIRITUAL SELF DEVELOPMENT This course offers the theory & practice of Hindu praxis of Prayer and Ritual Studies. The Hindu theological vision—that all existents, known & unknown, including oneself, is pervaded by the Divine, at once immanent and transcendent—is understood & assimilated by following practices designed to lead to the discovery of the interwoven nature of reality, including one’s place in the scheme of things. Prayer in the Hindu tradition, is viewed, at once, as a potent way to connect with the Divine & an articulation of the interconnections between individuals; the individual & the environment; and the micro & macro levels of the manifest universe. This course offers a thorough overview of rituals and hymns used in the tradition, emphasizing rituals meant to purify, heal, and balance (at the individual and collective levels). The course will examine the purpose & methods of: chanting the “prayers for peace” (santi-mantras); Vedic hymns (sukta-s), recitation of the divine names (as in the Vi??u-sahasranama); performance of rituals for healing self, community, & the ecosphere; and basic training in conducting a traditional fire ritual known as yajña. Background knowledge in Hinduism and Sanskrit is an asset but is not essential. The course is appropriate for MDiv, MA, and PhD students. Doctoral students will do additional research.

SACRED TEXTS SEMINAR (BSHR-6100)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Rebecca Esterson and Rita Sherma. What makes a text sacred? How does a community form a “canon” from original narratives? This course will explore the diverse ways in which sacred are read, understood, interpreted, embodied, and experienced. We will undertake a journey of discovery of the many ways in which sacred texts serve lived religion in the following traditions: Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism [alphabetical order]. After a study of their historical development ecumenically and interreligiously, we will consider their function within the tradition (theological, contemplative, liturgical, ritual, pastoral, spiritual formation, ethical, artistic, performative, etc.) and the hermeneutical principles that guide their interpretation.

INTRO TO RABBINIC LITERATURE (BSHS-0006)

Credits:3

This class will serve as an introduction to rabbinic literature and history. We will consider the development of rabbinic Judaism in its late-antique context and gain familiarity with the primary collections of rabbinic literature: the Talmud and Midrash. Some themes that we will explore include rabbinic Biblical hermeneutics, the origins of rabbinic law, the rise of rabbinic authority and rabbinic constructions of gender.

INTRO TO RABBINIC LITERATURE (BSHS-3320)

Credits:3

CHRISTIANITY FROM CHRIST TO CONSTANTINE (BSHS-3455)

Credits:3

This course is an exploration into the writings of the early Church, using the primary sources of texts from key figures within the church’s early centuries and Eusebius of Caesarea’s ecclesiastical history. Following the story of a non-entity on Good Friday that converted the world’s greatest empire within three centuries, this course traces the continuation of the Christian movement from the book of Acts up through the conversion of the Emperor in the fourth century, following its mission to uphold and spread the gospel amidst persecutions and internal challenges to the faith. Employing a seminar format, this class will shed light on how the teachings of Scripture were understood and lived out among the earliest generations of Christians, the ways in which early Christianity corresponded and contrasted with the cultures, values and religions of the ancient world, and how studying these writings can help us better understand our own mission as heirs to the faith of these earliest believers. This class is for MDiv and MA/MTS students, and evaluates with a major research paper (50%), reading responses (25%) and class discussion (25%).

HISTORY OF BIBLICAL INTERPRET (BSHS-4050)

Credits:3

While much of the academic study of the Bible since the rise of historical criticism has tended to focus on the cultural, religious, linguistic, and political setting of the text's authors and redactors, a complementary approach explores how the Bible has been interpreted in the generations since its authorship. Often phrased "reception history" the study of the history of biblical interpretation considers the life of biblical texts post-antiquity. The class will begin with a consideration of "inner-biblical exegesis" or the way in which later parts of the Bible reinterpret or allude to earlier parts. Taking our cue from the Bible itself, we will consider interpretation a fundamentally biblical activity, and will engage commentaries, art, poetry, and homilies spanning the millennia and across religious traditions. We will sample a range of methods and interpretations, from Classical rabbinic and early Christian Typological interpretations, to postmodern feminist and ecocritical commentaries. Other readings will include selections from the Qur'an, Rashi, the Zohar, Thomas Aquinas and William Blake.

JEWS CHRISTIANS AND THE BIBLE (BSHS-5100)

Credits:3

JEWS, CHRISTIANS, AND THE BIBLE: INTERPRETATION, APPROPRIATION, AND EXCHANGE The last quarter of a century has seen a proliferation of research on the history of the intersection between Jewish and Christian biblical interpretation. New perspectives on identity formation, anti-Judaism, philosemitism, and Christian Hebraism, for instance, have advanced our understanding of the history of the discourses between and within Judaism and Christianity. This class will survey the scholarly literature in this field, and critically engage various methodologies at work in this literature. Therefore, in addition to a study of Christian and Jewish interpretation of the Bible and of each other throughout history, this class will investigate the scholarly discourse of our own day.

ADVANCED SANSKRIT (BSPT-5000)

Credits:3

SCRIPTURAL STUDY AND TRANSLATION: This is an advanced Sanskrit language course with an emphasis on improving reading and translation skills. While we will go over some grammar rules, the focus of the course will be to familiarize oneself with a variety of Sanskrit language texts in the Hindu tradition—primary scriptural texts such as the Upanishads; secondary scriptural texts, such as the Panchadashi and Bhagavad Gita; commentaries such as that of Adi Shankara and Anandagiri; and literary works of Kalidasa and Bhasa. Students are expected to be familiar with the devanagari script and the foundational grammar rules of the Sanskrit language. [Auditors with faculty permission]

RACE/ETHNICITY IN THE BIBLICAL WORLD (BSRS-4040)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Aaron Brody and Sharon Jacob. This course will explore the representations of race/ethnicity in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, New Testament, and the ancient cultures that influenced and produced the texts. Since this is a relatively new field of study in the ancient world, students will be doing original research and working together to develop paradigms for understanding the concepts in the Bible as understood through critical race and ethnicity theories. Grades will be based on active class participation in this seminar course, oral presentation(s), and a research paper.

GENESIS: A JOURNEY INWARD (BSST-2000)

Credits:3

This course will explore the book of Genesis from a Swedenborgian exegetical perspective. The book of Genesis holds a particular fascination for those in the Swedenborgian interpretive lineage, as a text in which myth and history meet. The story telling of the ancients speaks across time, filling our present world with dramas of family and fertility and of connection to and estrangement from the Divine. We will engage a close reading of some of Swedenborg’s earliest biblical commentaries, including his fictional account of the Adam and Even story, De Cultu et Amore Dei, The Worship and Love of God. We will also survey Swedenborg’s many theological volumes dedicated to interpreting Genesis, such as Arcana Coelestia and The Word Explained, and explore our own intuitive connections to and interpretations of this collection of ancient and sublime texts that we call Genesis.

XN ETHICS: RAD LOVE EMBODIED (CE-1125)

Credits:3

This course introduces the practice and theory of moral formation, discernment, and conduct through the lens of Christian Ethics. Ethics is viewed as the art-science bringing Christian traditions and critical theory to the tasks of: 1) discerning what is right for any given situation, 2) finding moral-spiritual power to act on that discernment, and 3) discovering what forms individuals and society toward the good and what mal-forms away from it. The course includes some emphasis on Anglican and Lutheran perspectives, and holds social transformation toward justice and ecological well-being as an inherent aim of Christian ethics. This course is jointly offered by CDSP & PLTS. [30 max enrollment]

ROMAN CATHOLIC SEXUAL ETHICS (CE-2003)

Credits:3

This seminar course will examine human sexuality from the perspective of the Roman Catholic tradition as experienced in various cultural contexts and in dialogue with other religious traditions. The investigation includes an examination of the Church teachings and studies by leading theologians that explore topics such as marriage, family life, single life, and celibacy. The interreligious component seeks to foster a dialogue between the Roman Catholic Church and other faith communities concerning the core topics of the course. Method of evaluation consists of two 8-10 page papers (mid-term and final), weekly moodle posts, and group presentations. The course is intended for MA/MTS, MDiv students. PHD and DMin students are welcome but must register for a course upgrade and complete a 20 pages research paper for their final paper. [Faculty Consent required; 15 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

MORALITY & ETHICS (CE-2013)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by LeAnn Flesher and Michael Mathews. This course is part of the 5 course Public Theology program. The class will be geared toward assisting the student in establishing a systematic personal ethical method from which one does their work--training clergy and community leaders to bring their spiritual perspective to the most pressing social issues of our time--and assisting them in creating ways to have their voices be heard. Class meets daily, 1/14/2019-1/18/2019, from 9:00am to 5:00pm at ABSW.

FAMILY ETHICS (CE-2016)

Credits:3

The course will engage Christian thinking on sex, gender, marriage, family, and children. By taking family as its primary frame, the course carves out a space at the intersection of sexual ethics and social ethics. Questions include: Why do Christians care about family? What is sex for? What is gender and does it matter? What does justice have to do with marriage? Readings: Catholic and Protestant theologians, social scientists, critical theorists. Format: reading, discussion, and lecture. Student evaluation will be based on weekly reading responses, discussion, a take-home exam, and a final paper. Students should have taken one prior course in ethics.

FUNDAMENTAL MORAL THEOLOGY (CE-2045)

Credits:3

This course (designed for the MA/MDiv/MTS levels) will consider the fundamental principles of moral theology (the teleological drive for happiness and perfection, the moral virtues, freedom and voluntariness, natural law, prudence, the determinants of the moral act, moral "objectivity" and intentionality) from the perspective of the Roman Catholic tradition, particularly in the lineage of Aquinas. We will also examine in some detail the contemporary debate over the nature and importance of the "indirectly voluntary.” Students should be prepared to engage in disciplined and critical reading and thinking in the Aristotelian/Thomist tradition, and be willing and able to synthesize a large amount of sometimes complex and difficult material; this is not an easy course. The format is lecture, with opportunity for questions and discussion; students will be required to write a book review and take an in-class final examination. Class attendance is required.

FUNDAMENTAL MORAL THEOLOGY (CE-2056)

Credits:3

This course explores fundamental concepts of Roman Catholic moral theology, including: moral anthropology; the use of Scripture in morals; the nature and function of moral norms; conscience and its formation; natural law; fundamental option and sin; virtue and the telos of human life, and modes of moral reasoning. Moral theology is fundamentally a discipline of practical reasoning: these concepts will be addressed in the context of concrete cases and issues as well as at the abstract and theoretical level. Format is lecture/discussion on-line: students will watch short lectures, take short quizzes and participate in on-line discussion forums. Student evaluation will be based on 3 essay examinations, with the option of writing a research paper in place of the second two exams, a group wiki project, and participation in on-line discussions.

FUNDAMENTAL MORAL THEOLOGY (CE-2056)

Credits:3

This course explores fundamental concepts of Roman Catholic moral theology, including: moral anthropology; the use of Scripture in morals; the nature and function of moral norms; conscience and its formation; natural law; fundamental option and sin; virtue and the telos of human life, and modes of moral reasoning. Moral theology is fundamentally a discipline of practical reasoning: these concepts will be addressed in the context of concrete cases and issues as well as at the abstract and theoretical level. Format is lecture/discussion, and student evaluation will be based on 3 essay examinations, with the option of writing a research paper in place of second two exams. This course meets the requirements of an Introductory course in the JST MDiv curriculum.

INTRODUCTION TO BIOMEDICAL ETHICS (CE-2506)

Credits:3

An introduction to major methodological and practical questions in biomedical ethics. In this course, we'll consider topics including methodologies, beginning of life issues, (e.g.. reproductive technologies, stem life issues. (e.g., assisted suicide and pastoral care in the hospital setting. Topics may change if students wish to pursue a particular interest. Grades will be based on class participation, weekly reflection papers, and a final project. While there is no prerequisite for this course previous study of ethics will be helpful. [Faculty Consent required]

ANGLICAN MORAL THEOLOGY (CE-2600)

Credits:3

In this seminar course, we will look at Anglican moral theology, its relationship to ethics and systematic theology, the historical development of moral theology, and put the theory into practice by considering pastoral situations. As a course under the realm of constructive theology, we will articulate the relationship between sound theory/doctrines and the Christian witness to the world. The outcomes of the course will be evaluated through structured essays, an essay exam, and an integrative final paper. This course is taught in a flex hybrid format where, if needed, students can attend the online section or the in person section. This course is designed for MDIV, MA/MTS, and could be upgraded for PhD/ThD students. [12 max enrollment]

CATHOLIC SOCIAL TEACHING (CE-3050)

Credits:3

This is a seminar course focused on the Roman Catholic social teaching as expressed in the encyclical tradition from Leo XIII to Pope Francis and the Regional Bishops’ Conferences of the Catholic Church. The study will examine the development of Catholic social thought as it emerges from the reading of the “signs of the times” in light of sacred scripture, natural law, and virtue. Method of evaluation consists of two 8-10 page papers (mid-term and final), weekly Moodle posts, group presentations, and monthly news analysis. The course is intended for MA/MTS, MDiv students. PHD and DMin students are welcome but must register for a course upgrade and complete additional research and writing according to an upgrade plan agreed upon with instructor. [Faculty Consent required; 15 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

CHRISTIAN SOCIAL ETHICS (CE-3230)

Credits:3

ETHICS & SPIRITLTY OF MNSTRY (CE-3615)

Credits:3

What makes a good minister? What makes a bad minister? Who do you hope to become in the course of your ministry? What sustains and enlivens pastoral ministry? What particular issues and concerns are of significance in the practice of ministry? In this course, we will bring into dialogue aspects of the ethics and spirituality of ministry in various contexts: parishes, schools, prisons, etc. The aim is to develop an account of some of the virtues relevant to pastoral ministry. This account should both reflect the best aspects of the ministers who have been formative for us, and serve as a guide in our own future practice of ministry. I assume that all students bring to this class some experience in volunteer or professional ministry. While it is not a requirement of this class that students be engaged in practical ministry during this term, I strongly encourage you to do so. The course is organized according to four salient virtues for ministry: self-care, justice, fidelity and trustworthiness, and is most suitable for M.Div. and ministry-related MA students. This class is taught as a seminar. Grading will be based on weekly reflection papers, discussion facilitation, class participation, and a final paper or project. [One prior graduate level introductory moral theology or ethics class is required; Faculty Consent required; 15 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

VIOLENCE, JUSTICE AND MERCY (CE-4006)

Credits:3

This course will consider the difficult topics of war, incarceration, sexual violence, racism, torture, and migration using the framework of justice and mercy. In each case we will ask: What does justice require? What does mercy require? Can we make sense of suffering? Is forgiveness desirable or necessary? Is healing possible? Immersion component: a one week immersion trip over spring break to El Paso/Juarez is required. Format: reading/seminar-style discussion. Student evaluation will be based on weekly one-page reading reflection papers, discussion, and a final paper. Students should have taken one prior course in ethics. [Faculty Consent required; 12 max enrollment]

SEXUAL ETHICS (CE-4040)

Credits:3

Sexuality is sacred. This intensive course examines the role of sexual health for faith communities and their leaders. Students will engage key theological, ethical and public health perspectives on themes in sexual ethics, including: sexual freedom and responsibility, pleasure and desire, boundaries and consequences, heteropatriarchy and resistance, responding to violence and misconduct, abortion care, reproductive technologies, and prophetic witness for sexual justice. The course also provides students pursuing ministry and leadership within a tradition the opportunity to demonstrate their competency in professional clergy sexual ethics and promoting sexually healthy congregations. Particular emphasis is paid to queer and womanist/feminist voices on sexuality and faith. Evaluation is based on participation and discussion leadership, as well as case study analysis. It is open to both high- and low-residence students who have consistent access to technology requirements. Students should have taken the ECO Seminar, passed another course related to systemic oppression, or be willing to take a pre-course module. Relates to SKSM Threshold 5 and fulfills required course content for MFC Competency 2 [25 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

METHODS IN ETHICS (CE-5002)

Credits:3

Clear understanding of ethical method is a fundamental tool for teaching and research in ethics and moral theology. In ethics, methodology determines what "counts" as relevant information, the process by which that information is used, and the nature of an adequate response to a moral question. This seminar will explore the major methods used in Christian ethics and apply them to contemporary issues. Class format is lecture/discussion; weekly short papers and a final major paper on a topic of the student’s choice are required. This class is intended for GTU PhD students, JST-SCU STD and STL (comps option) students, and advanced master’s degree students in all programs. [Faculty Consent required]

INTRODUCTION TO BIOETHICS (CE-5008)

Credits:3

This seminar will provide an overview of bioethics. Starting with the dominant philosophical approach, the course will then look to Christian approaches to bioethics. The remainder of the course will be spent examining particular issues in bioethics, including stem cell research, cloning, organ transplantation, and genetic engineering. Students will be asked to present materials related to one of the issues, write a reflection paper on a second of the issues, and write a final paper constructing a position on an issue in bioethics. No prior experience in science or ethics needed.

INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIAN ETHICS (CE-8109)

Credits:3

CHRISTIAN ETHICS: RADICAL LOVE (CE-8125)

Credits:3

XN ETHICS: RAD LOVE EMBODIED. This online course introduces the practice and theory of moral formation, discernment, and conduct through the lens of Christian Ethics. Ethics is viewed as the art-science bringing Christian traditions and critical theory to the tasks of: 1) discerning what is right for any given situation, 2) finding moral-spiritual power to act on that discernment, and 3) discovering what forms individuals and society toward the good and what mal-forms away from it. The course includes some emphasis on Anglican and Lutheran perspectives, and holds social transformation toward justice and ecological well-being as an inherent aim of Christian ethics. This course is jointly offered by CDSP & PLTS. [20 max enrollment]

RELIGION, VIOLENCE AND PEACE (CE-8130)

Credits:3

From a global interdisciplinary perspective, we consider theories of religious violence and the nature of religiously inflected conflicts. We will address theological ethics, theories and practices of peacebuilding that claim to bring about a just, decolonial peace. The course will consider ethical responses to war (pacifism, just war, just peace, humanitarian intervention), and normative regimes and peace movements that respond to violence. This hybrid course also includes three US Institute of Peace short online modules and four face to face sessions. Hybrid meeting times: We will meet four times during the semester on Friday 12-2pm. (February 8, March 1 and May 10; other meeting TBA.)

HEALTH ETHICS (CE-8212)

Credits:3

Health and medicine lie at the intersection of our religion/spirituality, values, and bodies. This course provides a foundation in bioethics and the complexities of health, illness and health care. Students develop the ability to apply ethical theory and bio-political knowledge to key ethical issues, such as end-of-life decision-making, patient-provider relationships, genetic/reproductive technologies, the care of vulnerable populations, organ donation, and crisis medicine. The course includes a significant "laboratory" component, in which students develop and lead discussion of key concepts and cases in order to provide valuable arguments and cultivate pastoral leadership. the course requires weekly consistent on-line community building and peer-to-peer accountability practices, which enhance the learning and engagement for all. Relates to SKSM Threshold 5 and MFC Competency 2 and 4. [Students are expected to have taken an introductory course in ethics, have significant undergraduate philosophy or ethics experience or some equivalent educational experiences in a related field. Final acceptance to the course will be determined on a case-by-case basis. Students should contact the instructor to discuss their interests and experiences. 25 max enrollment]

CONFESSIONAL MINISTRY (CEFT-2000)

Credits:1.5

The course offers a practicum on the Sacrament of Reconciliation, focusing on the theological, pastoral and canonical issues the confessor may encounter. The course is designed for Roman Catholic ordination candidates who have completed their M.Div. requirements in moral theology, canon law, sacramental theology, and pastoral counseling, and who are able to critically analyze moral action in light of the principles of Roman Catholic moral theology in the tradition of Aquinas. No written work, but attendance at each and every class and full participation is required of all. Local clergy will also participate in the sessions as role players. The course requires strong oral presentations skills.

CNFSSIONAL RITES & PRACTICES (CEFT-2107)

Credits:3

This course will examine the Roman Catholic Sacrament of Reconciliation from its historical, theological, moral, pastoral, liturgical and canonical perspectives. It is designed for those who will preside at the Sacrament of Reconciliation as presbyters. The emphasis will be an ongoing practicum on reconciliation rites and practices, utilizing role-playing of a variety of confessional cases and issues. The course will also involve an in-depth discussion of moral, liturgical and pastoral theology as it is related to the Sacrament. Attention will be paid to pastoral care in a variety of different contexts of sacramental confession, as well as related pastoral, moral and canonical issues which often surface in the celebration of the Rite of Reconciliation. This course fulfills the Society of Jesus' requirements for confessional rites and includes the ad audienda requirements of the Church for all candidates for ordination.

PATRISTIC SALVATION & ETHICS (CEHS-4070)

Credits:3

This course will take an interdisciplinary approach (theology, ethics, history, and spirituality) to exploring the connections between ethics and salvation within the thought of the early Christian Church. The readings will focus more heavily on Eastern writers such as Sts. Basil, John Chrysostom, and Maximos the Confessor, but will also include key western authors such as St. Augustine. Seminar format with evaluation based on class participation, reflection papers, and a research paper.

ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS (CEHS-4200)

Credits:3

This course will introduce and explore the concept of environmental ethics. Beginning with biblical and early Christian witnesses, students will learn about ascetic and patristic references to the relationship between humans and the rest of creation. The course will also address recent questions and approaches to a Christian Environmental Ethic.

OUR WORK IN CONTEXT SEMINAR (CEPS-2100)

Credits:1.5

On-campus social justice seminar for MDiv-MASC students whose studies focus on spiritual direction and chaplaincy. This seminar will include deep self-examination and contextualizing of students' healing work/ministry using social-ecological and social-dominance theoretical frameworks. Students will discuss ways to engage in their individualized pastoral and spiritual studies while at the same time bringing an anti-oppression, culturally competent understanding of broader societal issues to their understanding. In-person seminars will be flexibly scheduled to dovetail with students' scheduled chaplaincy and spiritual direction studies. Reading will include chapters and articles offered throughout the semester. Periodic Zoom conversations will take place between the on-campus seminars. Brief integrative reflection papers will be required. This course is high-residency. Students must contact the instructor via e-email prior to enrolling in order to receive permission to register. Registration is contingent upon faculty approval. [8 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

ISSUES IN MINISTRY AND AGING (CEPS-3900)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Devorah Greenstein and Nancy Arvold. In this one week intensive course, we share our attention between focused pastoral care and broader societal aspects of aging. We examine aging-related issues both as individuals’ personal circumstances and as clear manifestations of the broader societal context in which individual situations and problems are situated. Issues include (and are not limited to) developmental theories, marginalizations/inequalities/microaggressions, role changes/identities, spiritual development, caregiver supports, end of life issues. Activities include lectures (guest and instructors), discussions, films, enactments/role plays, art/music activities. Brief daily journaling and final paper required. Prerequisite reading of one book and some articles. Suitable for students interested in chaplaincy, hospice work, pastoral care, as well as students interested in aging and broader sociological perspectives. Intermediate/advanced course intended for MDiv/MASC students, with doctoral upgrade possible. The course relates to Thresholds #2 and #5. MFC Competences #2 and #4. Students must contact the instructor via e-email prior to enrolling in order to receive permission to register. Registration is contingent upon faculty approval. Course meets daily, 1/7/2019-1/11/2019, from 9am-5pm at SKSM. [12 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

INTRO TO PASTORAL COUNSELING (CEPS-8411)

Credits:3

This online pastoral counseling course will introduce students to culturally responsive counseling practices and foster multicultural awareness. Students will examine societal and institutional structures of power and privilege, and will become more aware of the biases, prejudices, and microaggressions that are detrimental to the growth of the human spirit. Students will study major counseling theories and will practice basic helping skills centered on Person-Centered (Rogerian) counseling and Bowen Family Systems Theory. Contextual pastoral elements will be included, especially in the use of Bowen Family Systems as applied to congregational contexts. This is an asynchronous course, with written lectures and frequent use of videos and links to online resources. Weekly personal reflections and weekly Zoom skill-practice exercises with a class-mate-practice-partner will be required. It is an intermediate course intended for MDiv students, and with doctoral upgrade possible. Meet Thresholds: Spiritual Practice and Care of the Soul, Prophetic Witness Meets MFC Competencies: Pastoral Care and Presence, Social Justice in the Public Square [Faculty Consent required; 24 max enrollment]

AGRARIAN THEOLOGIES PART 1 (CERS-1501)

Credits:1.5

COUNTER-OPPRESSIVE AGRARIAN THEOLOGIES - INTRODUCTORY INTENSIVE How does a perspective of the divine grounded in the soul, in the humus that makes us human, shape our relationship to each other, to the planet, and to God? This experiential and embodied course will help religious leaders gain first-hand experience in the spiritual and structural nuances of our food systems and in how our lives and ministries fit within them. We will explore how systems of oppression intersect with our own bodies through how we produce and interact with the food we eat, and create space for creative imagining and exploration of solutions to food systems problems. This intensive, in-person class will provide a foundation and common language for students to bring with them into Part 2 of this course, which will be conducted online and which will require weekly volunteering at a local farm or garden in the student's community (the instructor can help make connections for this). Students are required to enroll in both parts. The course is intended for all students. This course may help meet the Starr King thresholds for Prophetic Witness and Work, Spiritual Practice and Care for the Soul, Educating for Wholeness and Liberation, and Embodied Wisdom and Beauty. It may also help meet the MFC competencies of Spiritual Development for Self and Others, Social Justice in the Public Square, and Leads the Faith into the Future. Course meets daily, 1/14/19-1/19/19, from 9am-1pm at SKSM.

FREEDOMS IN A COMPLEX WORLD (CERS-2001)

Credits:3

The course discusses the inadequacy of Western classical interpretations of freedom. First, it presents interpretations of freedom such as: freedom to be a moral human being; freedom of choosing the authentic self; freedom as fight for the change of the shared world and community. Second, the course investigates how these Western classical interpretations of freedom must be reconsidered in light of multiple perspectives and contemporary challenges, such as: the problem of injustice in freedom as existential choice, as analyzed by Black Existentialism; the compatibility of Christian mythology within the globalized world; the clash between law and freedom in the urgent issue of migration in the US southern borders and the Mediterranean Sea. Evaluation methods will include research papers, reflection papers, and class presentations and is open to MDiv, MA/MASC/MTS, DMin, PhD/ThD or any combination thereof. The course is taught by Dr. Andrea Vestrucci (Ph.D., Th.D.), a SKSM Research Scholar. Relates to SKSM Thresholds: 1) Life in Religious Community and Interfaith Engagement, 2) Prophetic Witness and Work, 4) History of Dissenting Traditions and the Thea/ological Quest, 6) Thea/ology in Culture and Context, 7) Educating for Wholeness and Liberation, & 8) Embodied Wisdom and Beauty and Ministerial Fellowship Competencies (MFC): 2) Pastoral Care and Presence, 3) Spiritual Development for Self and Others, 4) Social Justice in the Public Square, & 7) Leads the faith into the future.

FAITHFUL, ETHICAL FUNDRAISING (CERS-2052)

Credits:3

CLIMATE JUSTICE; THEO & ACTIO (CERS-4450)

Credits:3

This intensive seminar course will use methodologies of Christian ethics and interaction with local climate justice activists to examine: 1) the climate crisis as a moral matter in relationship to various forms of structural injustice including injustice grounded in race/ethnicity, class, and colonialism, and 2) pathways for addressing the climate crisis with hope. Special attention will be given to global–local connections and perspectives from marginalized communities. Methodological resources include liberation ethics, Earth ethics, post-colonial perspectives, eco-feminist perspectives, and eco-hermeneutics. The course involves reading, writing, engagement with community groups, collaborative knowledge building, and discussion. The informing undercurrent of the course is the quest for hope and moral-spiritual agency in the face of seemingly insurmountable obstacles. [30 max enrollment]

TECHNOLOGY & HUMAN PRESENCE (CERS-4875)

Credits:3

New technologies are broadly reshaping human relationships—the ways in which people are or are not present with each other. In this seminar, we will engage resources available across the academic study of religion and theology to examine, critique, and productively address these impacts. In doing so, we will explore the important roles that religion scholars and theologians might play both in shaping public understandings of technologies’ impacts on presence and in shaping the technologies themselves. The seminar is part of Public Theologies of Technology and Presence, a three-year program and research initiative funded by the Henry Luce Foundation. The seminar affords students the opportunity to take up the program’s questions and work. The approach to the seminar is multidisciplinary and interreligious. Students are welcome from all academic disciplines, specializations, and religious traditions. Method of Evaluation: class participation, reflection papers, final paper. Suitable for graduate students pursuing any advanced degrees. There are no prerequisites. Course is repeatable for credit. [15 max enrollment]

AGRARIAN THEOLOGIES PART 2 (CERS-8102)

Credits:1.5

COUNTER-OPPRESSIVE AGRARIAN THEOLOGIES - LOCAL LAND-BASED LEARNING How does a perspective of the divine grounded in the soul, in the humus that makes us human, shape our relationship to each other, to the planet, and to God? This online yet experiential and embodied course will help religious leaders gain first-hand experience in the spiritual and structural nuances of our food systems and in how our lives and ministries fit within them. We will explore how systems of oppression intersect with our own bodies through how we produce and interact with the food we eat, and create space for creative imagining and exploration of solutions to food systems problems. This course builds upon the foundation laid in the required Agrarian Theologies Part 1 intensive. Students will spend time each week volunteering at a local garden or farm (instructor can offer assistance with placements), using that experience as a primary text to bring into dialogue with selected readings. Students will be evaluated based on their engaged reflections and online dialogue with each other, in addition to a final paper or project. The course is intended for all students. This course may help meet the Starr King thresholds for Prophetic Witness and Work, Spiritual Practice and Care for the Soul, Educating for Wholeness and Liberation, and Embodied Wisdom and Beauty. It may also help meet the MFC competencies of Spiritual Development for Self and Others, Social Justice in the Public Square, and Leads the Faith into the Future.

BODY & SOUL/CUERPO Y ALMA (CEST-2300)

Credits:3

"Decolonizing Latinx and Liberation Theologies." This course will explore Latin American Liberation Theologies and embodied ritual practices that interrogate the body as a space of contention, resistance, and transformation. Requirements: Weekly attendance and participation; Three individual five (5) page reflection papers; One collective class presentation; One final individual paper/project. Examples of topics to be discussed: 1) Indigenous Ways of Knowing: The Lived Religious Experience. 2) Two-Spirits/Queer/GNC Latinx Bodies as Decolonizing Narratives of Resistance. 3) Fleshing the Spirit: Storytelling and Healing Rituals as Research and Theological Narratives. Relates to SKSM Thresholds: 4, 5, 6, 8. Relates to MFC Comps: 1, 3, 4, 6, 7. [32 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

FEMINIST THEOLOGY AND ETHICS (CEST-3261)

Credits:3

A consideration of major voices in feminist theology and ethics. Will treat both constructive and ethical questions, emphasizing the dialogue between sex and gender studies and theology. Format is seminar with minimal lecture. Student evaluation to be based on participation, weekly reading response papers, and a final project. [15 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

MORAL INJURY (CEST-5000)

Credits:3

The concept of moral injury strives to address the deep spiritual wounds experienced by many - as perpetrators, victims, or witnesses - in the context of war, violence and injustice. In this advanced interdisciplinary seminar, we will critically engage different definitions of moral injury related to the spiritual wounds of war and military occupation, and explore the uses and the redefinitions of moral injury in relation to other issues involving systemic violence and oppression (e.g., sexual assault, genocide, racism, transphobia, economic injustice, climate change, mass migrations, Islamophobia – addressed intersectionally). The course will explore the articulation of the concept of moral injury in different spiritual and theological traditions, and challenge the role of theologies, spirituality and the arts in proposing individual and collective processes of healing, transformation and justice-making. Introductory paper, two reflection essays, one course presentation and a final paper. Doctoral students; advanced MA, M.Div. and MASC students need to contact the instructor via email and obtain permission before enrolling. Prerequisites: ECO and Multi-religious Core Intensives, or similar courses, preferred. Relates to SKSM Thresholds # 2,5 and 6 and to MFC competencies 2, 3 and 5. [15 max enrollment]

ECO-THEOLOGIES (CEST-8450)

Credits:3

As theologians rooted in Judeo-Christian religious traditions have responded to the complex nexus of the injustices of ecological crises and social inequities, a variety of critical and constructive theologies have emerged. This course explores how ecotheologies, including ecofeminist, ecowomanist, queer ecotheologies, and Native American theologies of creation, have engaged the major issues in ecotheology, and in what ways these theologies address contemporary environmental/ecological issues. Each student will research one current ecological issue as a conversation partner for the theologies we will study. We will also be asking questions about the implications of these theological projects for liturgical practices, congregational mission, and the students' own constructive theological work where applicable. Weekly reading and regular online participation in Moodle's discussion board, weekly group work via synchronistic online tools, two synthesis papers, and a final project are required. Prior coursework in theology helpful but not required. Intended for M.Div., MASC, MA, and certificate students. The course relates to SKSM's Thresholds 1, 2, 6 and MFC Compentencies 3, 4, 7. The online course is asyncrhonous with synchronous small group work. [15 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

CSR FINAL PROJECT (CSR-3001)

Credits:3

The final component of the CSR program, the CSR Final Project is designed by the student with the approval of their CSR advisor/coordinator. Students sign up for CSR 3001 when the semester they are completing this project. The general topic of the project is established when you enter the CSR program and is used to direct your course of study throughout the program. The project should include both research and community application components. Students are recommended to consult with at least two CSR-related faculty (either regular or adjunct) concerning their final projects. [Faculty Consent required]

MORALITY & ETHICS (DM-5013)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by LeAnn Flesher and Michael Mathews. This course is part of the 5 course Public Theology program. The class will be geared toward assisting the student in establishing a systematic personal ethical method from which one does their work--training clergy and community leaders to bring their spiritual perspective to the most pressing social issues of our time--and assisting them in creating ways to have their voices be heard. Class meets daily, 1/14/2019-1/18/2019, from 9:00am to 5:00pm at ABSW.

PUBLIC THEOLOGY INTERNSHIP (DM-5400)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by LeAnn Flesher and Michael Mathews. This is the fifth of five courses in the Public Theology Certificate Program. In this course students will participate in a semester long internship in which they will work with a carefully selected mentor that has expertise in the student’s area of interest. Class Meeting Dates: (fall 2018): September 7--BBQ w/ mentors and cohort #2 (6:00 pm); October 12--Cohort #1 meets to share mentorship experiences (7:00 to 9:00 pm); December 7--Final meeting & celebration; Cohort #1 creates public presentation of project--the wider community invited (there will be food)--6:00-8:00 pm.

PUBLIC THEOLOGY (DM-5420)

Credits:3

DMIN SEMINAR (DM-6000)

Credits:3

This seminar is designed to assist PSR Doctor of Ministry students focus their projects and create a plan of study for the first year in the program before their "Request to Proceed with Project" form is submitted. The course will introduce a number of research methods, contextual and interdisciplinary modes of inquiry, and consider multi-cultural, multi-generational and socio-economic environments of ministry today. This is a seminar/discussion course and students will be evaluated on a preliminary essay, class participation, a bibliography and a plan of study. As part of the cohort pedagogy, students in the Beginning Seminar will share classroom space and discussion for part of every day with colleagues in the Continuing Seminar, and also meet as a separate seminar for part of every day.

UNDER SUPERVISION (DM-6005)

Credits:0

PSR DMin students use this course number for registering during terms when they are not registering for coursework. This course indicates continuation in the program and carries a fee per semester. (This number is also used during a term while the student is engaged in coursework away from PSR.) Pass/Fail only.

DMIN SUPERVISION (DM-6010)

Credits:6

DMin Supervision 1 applies to students at the proposal writing stage of their D/P. This course is designed for students enrolled in the DMin program at SFTS. It is not available for GTU cross-registration. Eligible students may apply directly to SFTS, Advanced Pastoral Studies. For more information, please go to: http://sfts.edu/academics/doctor-of-ministry/. Pass/Fail only. [Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded]

D.MIN. IN THESIS (DM-6011)

Credits:6

PSR DMin Students who have completed their Request to Proceed with Project process should register for this class until they finish and defend their work if they have already completed their 6 units of DMIN in Thesis. Course may be taken for 3-6 units.

D.MIN. SUPERVISION II (DM-6013)

Credits:6

Dmin Supervision 2 applies to students at the D/P stage. This course is designed for students enrolled in the DMin program at SFTS. It is not available for GTU cross-registration. Eligible students may apply directly to SFTS, Advanced Pastoral Studies. For more information, please go to: http://sfts.edu/academics/doctor-of-ministry/ . Pass/Fail only. [Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded]

PASTOR AS PERSON (DM-6017)

Credits:3

This foundational seminar engages students’ experiences as spiritual leaders in their ministry settings - their unique personal traits, relationships, talents and limitations - as they confront the expectations, tensions, and other complex realities that accompany the practice of ministry. Serving as an opportunity to share personal and professional issues with ministry peers, the course focuses on the themes of calling, spiritual leadership, and awareness of self in the intersections of multiple contexts. Recognizing the wisdom, limitations, and possibilities each carries into ministry, students will enter the conversation about spiritual leadership from her/his unique location. SFTS DMin students only. Course meets weekdays, 6/17/19-6/21/19, from 9am-5pm at SFTS.

DMIN ANNUAL CONTINUING SEMINAR (DM-6021)

Credits:1.5

The annual 1.5 unit Continuing Seminar of the Doctor of Ministry program at Pacific School of Religion is integral to the cohort design of the program and is organized around the principle of collegial professional support for shaping your thesis project. The 1.5 units are satisfied with reading learning colleague progress reports prior to the beginning of class and in-class participation. As with the beginning seminar DM 6000, class presentations and peer consultations comprise the primary strategy for academic and professional development of your thesis project. As part of the cohort pedagogy, students in the Continuing Seminar will share classroom space and discussion for part of every day with colleagues in the Beginning Seminar, and also meet as a separate seminar for part of every day. Before the week begins, post on the Moodle course site a 10-page minimum Progress Report Paper that includes the five elements cited in the assessment rubric. You will present your current work and thinking on your project during one of the class day sessions and be expected to engage actively in the feedback portion of learning colleagues’ presentations.

DMIN SUPPLEMENTAL STUDIES (DM-6022)

Credits:6

This course is undertaken by DMin students seeking to supplement required coursework with studies in the classroom or "out in the field" which enhance their readiness for Dissertation/Project stage work through expansion of their ministry experience base, research knowledge, and/or practice of ministry skills. This course is available for 0-6 units. [Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded]

LEADING ADAPTIVE ACTION (DM-6023)

Credits:3

CRITICAL INTERP & PROJ DEV I (DM-6031)

Credits:3

Critical Interpretation and Project Development I is a seminar style methods course intended to prepare and assist the DMin student for and in the preparation of his/her final dissertation project. This course will include refresher sessions on biblical exegesis, hermeneutics, systematic theology, constructive theology and contextual theology and introduce the student to the dissertation proposal. Throughout this seminar the student will develop the first draft of the first part of his/her project proposal including: the problem statement, project background, projected outcomes, contribution to transformational leadership, context of ministry, biblical & theological basis, methods of research, and proposed outline. The remainder of the project components will be developed in part II of this two part methods seminar. Class meets daily, 1/22/2019-1/26/2019, from 9:00am to 5:00pm at ABSW.

THEOLOGY, CULTURE AND MISSION (DM-6039)

Credits:3

As the second of two foundational seminars in the Doctor of Ministry program, this course, Theology, Culture and Mission, engages students in exploring a contextual approach to theological reflection and ministry by examining the interface between culture and mission, the issues and challenges of understanding their own social location, and the possibilities and limits of understanding their ministry setting in terms of its structural dynamics. Students will explore the emergence of contextual theologies as a way of examining how theology is shaped by socio-historical context and human experience. Students will explore the pastoral/praxis circle as a method of pastoral planning, examine various methods of social analysis, and engage both in social analysis and theological reflection on their ministry setting or a subset of it. [15 max enrollment] SUMMER 2019: Class meets weekdays, 6/24/2019-7/5/2019 (including July 4th), from 9:00am to 12:30pm at SFTS. This class still meets on July 4.

EMBODYING THE SPIRIT OF BELOVED COMMUNITY (DM-6044)

Credits:3

WOMANIST PRACTICAL THEOLOGY & PREACHING (DM-6048)

Credits:3

This course, Womanist Practical Theology & Preaching, employs concepts of womanist practical theology to undergird and inspire inclusive-holistic ministry and contextualized preaching. Developing and analyzing case studies, students will interpret and assess the contexts and situations that occasion their sermons. Students will integrate diverse disciplines to create and perform literate, thoughtful, liberating Scripture-based sermons that are pastorally inclusive and theologically relevant to the identified context. In addition, students will identify the implications of their analysis for church practice. [15 max enrollment] SUMMER 2019: Class meets daily, 7/8/2019-7/12/2019, from 9:00am to 5:00pm at SFTS.

WOMANIST / FEMINIST BIBLICAL INTERPRETATION (DM-6049)

Credits:3

This Womanist-Feminist Biblical Interpretation course will use intersecting disciplines of ethical theory and literature as tools to construct various approaches to womanist and feminist biblical hermeneutics. As such, the class will require students to develop paradigms for understanding concepts of race, ethnicity, and gender as competing and intersecting realities both within the Bible and in its use and misuse in reader reception throughout history. This is a hybrid course with an online component that extends beyond the last day in the classroom. Class meets daily, 1/14/2019-1/18/2019, from 2:00p to 5:00pm at SFTS.

CULTURALLY ATTENTIVE CONFLICT MINISTRY (DM-6051)

Credits:3

MAKING RITUAL RICH (DM-6072)

Credits:3

THEOLOGY, LITERATURE, & FILM (DM-6163)

Credits:3

DMIN COHORT CONVERSATIONS (DM-8600)

Credits:0.5

The third required seminar is the continuous online forum “Cohort Conversations (DMin 8600) that commences in the beginning semester of a student’s program and continues through the doctoral journey. Students participate in regular conversations sharing what they are learning in their coursework, what their live-edge questions are, issues about their program journey that need consultation, and how their research and final projects visions are shaping up. The seminar is designed to deepen collegial relationships over a period of time and to take advantage of the collective cohort wisdom. The DMin director and other PSR faculty may participate as needed. This seminar is given a half-unit for the first six semesters and is assessed on a pass/fail basis. Students participate in this course through Google Classroom.

PASTORAL CARE AND COUNSELING (DM-8650)

Credits:3

This course will be an online seminar conducted in Korean. The course is intended for MDiv & DMin students. Evaluation is based upon weekly quiz, reflection paper, and research paper. What is pastoral care and counseling? Who needs pastoral care and counseling? Why do we need pastoral care and counseling in this rapidly changing world where technology (such as intelligence agency and robotic science) seems to substitute human agency for healing and welfare? These questions will be carefully investigated and discussed, paying attention to different cultures, especially Korean communities. The history of pastoral care and counseling will be discussed in order to examine where we have come from, where we are now and where we need to go in the future. Basic skills, such as active listening, reflecting, empathy, and confrontation will be addressed in an effort to develop the necessary sensitivity, discernment, and courage to perform adequate, culturally sensitive pastoral care. [7 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

HOW PEOPLE CHANGE (DMPS-6040)

Credits:3

THEOLOGICAL REFLECTION OF CLINICAL ISSUES IN SCG (DMPS-6049)

Credits:3

This Theological Reflection of Clinical Issues in Spiritual Care Giving course will assist spiritual caregivers and religious counselors to think theologically about key psychological issues, diagnoses and dynamics and to use that theological understanding to enrich and inform their psychological, social and cultural understanding of people and families. We will consider many of the more common psychological dynamics, like depression, anxiety/fear, addictions, sickness, loss and trauma and relational dynamics. This course will summarize the current psychological understanding of these issues, and then explore various theological perspectives on the same issues. By so doing, the course will help students clarify the unique nature of a spiritual perspective. The course will then help students develop a uniquely spiritual assessment instrument, which could be a helpful diagnostic tool for spiritual caregivers. Class meets weekdays, 1/7/2019-1/18/2019, from 9:00am to 12:00pm at SFTS.

DYNAMICS OF TRAUMA (DMPS-6053)

Credits:0

This Dynamics of Trauma: A Spiritual Care Approach to Theory & Practice course consists of an in-depth practical-theological exploration of spiritual care ministry in trauma situations. It includes principles (dependable guides to practice) and tools (special resources for practice) for prevention, early intervention and recovery, in light of a vision of spiritual wisdom and of faith communities as ecologies of care, healing and wholeness. Those whose service or ministry focuses on the spiritual nature and care of God’s people in a variety of settings, including church, para-church, community organizations, and health centers, will find the course useful in terms of their ongoing personal-spiritual, academic, and professional-ministerial formation. The course has been designed so that multiple levels of learning—Certificate , Masters, Doctoral—can be engaged while all participants focus on the substantive content of spiritual care practice in trauma situations. Class work is approached with a practical theological framework and methodology. It includes case study presentations and analysis, lecture and discussion, and small group dynamics, role-playing exercises, and supervisory sessions. In addition to the reading, students are involved in an ongoing critical reflection by focusing on key questions and approaches, methods and techniques of spiritual care in trauma situations. Each student chooses a topic for class presentation which can also be the subject for a course project to be completed according to San Francisco Theological Seminary’s academic policies and guidelines. Final grading options are Pass/Fail. [15 max enrollment] SUMMER 2019: Class meets daily, 6/17/2019-6/21/2019, from 9:00am to 5:00pm at SFTS.

SELF, OTHER & COMMUNITY (DMRS-6051)

Credits:3

Educational philosopher, Maxine Greene, speaks of the “incomplete self” to challenge modernity’s notion of the autonomous self. The incomplete self exists within ongoing experience and within a vital matrix of interrelatedness with the world. Challenging individual introspection with a communal vision of transformation, the course contends for the inextricable link between self and social consciousness and considers how the “incomplete” self transforms through mutuality with others and practice of compassion. A generative focus of the seminar will be the necessary work by the church to articulate theologies of community and to live into—thereby, teach—ministries of reconciliation. Class meets daily, 1/14/2019-1/18/2019, from 9:00am to 5:00pm at SFTS.

CONTEMPLATIVE LISTENING (DMSP-6502)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to a variety of listening techniques and skills. We will work in small groups, dyads, and individually to deepen the ability to listen attentively and non-judgmentally to others (people, music, nature, inner experience). ENROLLMENT IN THIS COURSE IS LIMITED TO STUDENTS IN THE APS PROGRAM AT SFTS. Course meets daily, 1/7/19-1/11/19, from 9am-5pm at SFTS. [4 max enrollment]

GOD AND HUMAN SUFFERING (DMST-6070)

Credits:3

If God loves us like a mother or father loves her or his child, why do horrific things happen to us or to those we love? Where is God when these horrific things happen? This course looks at four Christian views of God's relation to human suffering, and allows students to develop their own understandings of God and human pain. Course meets weekdays, 6/24/19-6/28/19, from 9am-5pm at SFTS. [Admittance to SFTS DMin program]

PREPARATION FOR COMPREHENSIVES (DR-6001)

Credits:12

PREPARATION FOR COMPREHENSIVES (DR-6001)

Credits:3

For PhD and ThD students only. Course available for 0.5-12 units.

PREPARATION FOR DISSERTATION (DR-6002)

Credits:12

RETREAT PLANNING: THEOLOGY AND PRACTICE (ED-1050)

Credits:1

This workshop offers students the opportunity to plan retreats appropriate for audiences in different pastoral settings. It will involve exploring themes, organizing talks, designing activities, and discussing best practices. The course allows students to integrate different areas of their theological studies as applied to the praxis of retreat-giving. Class meets Saturdays, 1/26/19-2/2/19, from 8:30am-5:00pm.

POSTMODERN CHRISTIAN EDUCATION (ED-1225)

Credits:3

This foundational course in Christian Education attends to the plural cultures of the postmodern world, which form the present context within which Christian faith must be formed and nurtured. Using approaches that integrate theory, practice, and critical reflection within the course’s pedagogy, students will be enabled to foster the same capacities for critically-reflective and committed Christian praxis in persons of all ages, within particular contexts for ministry. Classes include lecture, discussion, small group work, and interactive learning exercises. Evaluation of class participation, two reflection papers, a reflective observation, and a major paper. Letter grade only. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment]

INTRO TO CHRISTIAN EDUCATION (ED-1530)

Credits:3

This foundational course in Christian Education explores five themes: the who, what, why, where, and how of Christian Religious Education. We will attend to the plural cultures of the ecumenical and interreligious world, which form the present context within which Christian faith must be formed and nurtured. Using approaches that integrate theory, practice and critical reflection within the course’s pedagogy and philosophy of education, students will be enabled to foster the same capacities for critically-reflective and committed Christian praxis for persons of all ages, within particular contexts for ministry. Classes include readings, lecture, discussion, small group work, and interactive learning/teaching exercises.

CHRISTIAN FAITH FORMATION: PEDAGOGIES & PRACTICES (ED-2225)

Credits:1.5

This course provides a practically minded orientation to Christian faith formation, paying close attention to a diversity of pedagogies and a variety of practices that can encourage growth in faith and Christian living for all ages. We concentrate upon: • significant contexts and theological themes for Christian education, • pedagogical theories and practical strategies for teaching, learning and fostering lifelong faith formation effectively, • mutually correlative relationships between faith formation in community and a daily life of discipleship. We consider questions like: Why does the church value faith formation as vital to its understanding of mission?" Who is faith formation "for,” primarily? What should the "contents" of a program of faith formation be? What can neuroscience teach us about faith formation? What challenges and insights are presented to pedagogies and practices of faith formation by differences in age, culture, and social location? What gets in the way of faith formation? What makes for an effective teaching/facilitating? How can participation in a program of faith formation impact the ways we understand discipleship – both our own and that of a Christian community? This course is offered as a seven-week intensive starting the week of February 4, 2019 and ending the week of March 18, 2019. Meets Thursdays 1:45-5:00pm. [30 max enrollment]

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION AND CRITICAL PEDAGOGY: A CHRISTIAN APPROACH (ED-3230)

Credits:3

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION AND CRITICAL PEDAGOGY: A CHRISTIAN APPROACH What is religious education? How have we done and how might we want to do in the future? The course introduces religious education from a perspective of critical pedagogy. Students will explore the six paradigms of religious education (tradition-centered, person-centered, justice-centered, family-centered, faith community-centered, and earth-centered educations) and examine them with critical theories, including race theory, postcolonialism, and feminism. The class will use the forms of lecture, student presentation, and small group discussion. Reading materials include, but are not limited to, the writings of Jack Seymour, Richard Osmer, Thomas Groome, and Mary Elizabeth Moore for RE, and Paulo Freire and bell hooks for critical pedagogy. This is a synchronous hybrid course, which means that students can join the class either in person or through Zoom. (It is expected that students choose either way and stick to it throughout the course.) [30 max enrollment]

ADULT RELIGIOUS EDUCATION (ED-4072)

Credits:3

Amidst growing consensus that people joining progressive churches seek personal growth and spiritual deepening, most Unitarian universalist congregations do not provide adequate programs to meet this need. This course provides students with an overview of the theory and practice of adult and multigenerational religious education in the progressive church. The second half of the course will be conducted as a seminar with students researching existing adult and multigenerational faith development/religious education/spiritual deepening programs and making constructive proposals for best practices in congregations. Participants will be evaluated on weekly participation and a final project. The course is suited to MDiv, MA/MTS, DMin, and certificate students. While the course touches on all of the SKSM thresholds, it is most related to #7, 5, 4, and 2. It also addresses MFC competencies #3, 4, and 7. This is a residential course accepting students participating through distance technologies. [12 max enrollment]

INTRO TO LIBERAL RELIGIOUS ED (ED-4212)

Credits:3

INTERRELIGIOUS LEARNING & EDU (ED-4700)

Credits:3

INTER-RELIGIOUS LEARNING AND EDUCATION Increasing religious conflict and violence based on ignorance and indifference call for inter-religious learning as a necessary and alternative religious practice today. This course surveys histories, theories, and practices of inter-religious learning and education. The course also explores issues and problems related to inter-religious engagement in particular religious, cultural, and historical contexts, and deals with subject matters, such as pluralism, identity, religion, and postmodern philosophies. Students participate in conversations with their own religious and cultural backgrounds, and find ways to apply inter-religious education to their own contexts as they conduct either a research project with their working theories or a practice project which presents a thorough plan for an inter-religious curriculum, ministry, or any other activity. [20 max enrollment]

POSTMODERN CHRISTIAN EDUCATION (ED-8110)

Credits:3

This foundational course in Christian Education attends to the plural cultures of the postmodern world, which form the present context within which Christian faith must be formed and nurtured. Using approaches that integrate theory, practice, and critical reflection within the course’s pedagogy, students will be enabled to foster the same capacities for critically-reflective and committed Christian praxis in persons of all ages, within particular contexts for ministry. Classes include weekly online postings, recorded lectures, Moodle forum discussions and small group work, and interactive learning exercises. Evaluation of class participation, two reflection papers, a reflective observation, and a major paper. Letter grade only. [Faculty Consent required; 15 max enrollment]

CHRISTIAN FAITH FORMATION: CONTEXTUAL CURRICULUM PROJECT (ED-8226)

Credits:0.5

This fully online, asynchronous course is the continuation of Christian Faith Formation: Pedagogies and Practices, however it can be taken independently as a component of any supervised fieldwork curriculum. It is intended to guide you in your development of a contextual curriculum project, to be designed, taught and evaluated in your internship or field education site. Prior graduate level study of diverse pedagogical theories and effective educational practices is essential to a successful project. This course is offered on a pass-no credit basis. If a letter grade is requested in writing, one will be provided. [ED-2225 Christian Faith Formation: Pedagogies and Practices; 30 max enrollment]

DYNAMIC YOUTH MINISTRY (EDFT-8462)

Credits:3

This lively and interactive course grounds participants in philosophical, psychological, programmatic, ethical and theological aspects of youth ministry. Geared toward Unitarian Universalists, but open to all religious or secular affiliations, this course seeks to embody a vision of youth ministry that is a vibrant, robust, and flexible part of every congregation and community. Topics of instruction include leadership and spiritual development, professional support for youth advisors, denominational polity, adolescent life issues, building intergenerational community, and a critical analysis of different models of youth ministry and programming. A foundational course recommended for all religious leaders, both new and old to youth ministry. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

EDUCATION FOR SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT (EDRS-2235)

Credits:3

EDUCATING FOR SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT (EDRS-8235)

Credits:3

SPECIAL FIELD STUDY MINISTRY I (FE-1003)

Credits:3

Specialized field study arranged in consultation and with approval of the Community Engaged Learning faculty. No course prerequisites. Pass/Fail only. To enroll, students must have made arrangements for an approved field education placement with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Students follow same coursework as for FE 1005, with regularly-scheduled meetings with CEL Director. [Faculty Consent Required; Auditors excluded]

SPECIAL FIELD STUDY MNSTRY II (FE-1004)

Credits:3

Specialized field study arranged in consultation and with approval of the Field Education faculty. No course prerequisites. Pass/Fail only. To enroll, students must have made arrangements for an approved field education placement with the Director of Field Education. This course is available for 1.5-3 units. [Faculty Consent required]

CONCURRENT FIELD STUDY I (FE-1005)

Credits:3

3 hour per week on-campus class and 15 hours per week on-site basic field education. 2-semester long course. Completion of both Fall & Spring semesters meets M. Div. program Concurrent Field Education requirement. Open to MTS students. Pass/Fail only. To enroll, student must have made arrangements for an approved field education placement with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Meets on Wednesday, 9:10AM - 12:00PM. in Holbrook 133 & 134. First class session is Wednesday, Sept 04, 2018. Students meet in full-group Plenaries and in small-group cohorts throughout the semester. See syllabus for schedule. ALL CONCURRENT FIELD EDUCATION STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO ATTEND COURSE ORIENTATION ON FIRST WEDNESDAY A.M. CLASS MEETING, SEPT. 4, 2018, 9:10A-12P. MENTORS WILL ALSO BE ASKED TO ATTEND THIS ORIENTATION. [Auditors excluded]

CONCURRENT FIELD STUDY II (FE-1006)

Credits:3

3 hour per week on-campus class and 15 hours per week on-site basic field education. Prerequisite: FE 1005 in Fall 2018. Completion of Fall & Spring semesters meets MDiv program Basic Field Education requirement. Open to MTS students. Pass/Fail only. To enroll, student must have made arrangements for an approved field education placement with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Section 01 meets Wednesdays, starting 1/30/2019, from 9:10am to 12:00pm in Holbrook 133 & 134. [FE 1005 in Fall 2018; Auditors excluded] Section 02, co-taught by Christy Newton and Sandra Blair, meets Mondays, starting 2/4/2019, from 6:10pm to 9:00pm, in Holbrook 134. [FE 1005 in Fall 2018; Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded]

INTERNSHIP I (FE-1011)

Credits:3

Full-time on-site field education. Arranged in consultation and with approval of Field Education faculty. Pass/Fail only. Internship to meet M.Div. program Field Ed requirement can begin in Fall, Spring, or Summer as long as it occurs over 9 consecutive months. To enroll, students must have made arrangements for an approved field education placement with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Full-time internship students can only take one other course per semester. [Faculty permission required; Auditors excluded]

INTERNSHIP III (FE-1013)

Credits:3

Full-time on-site field education. Arranged in consultation and with approval of Field Education faculty. Pass/Fail only. Internship to meet MDiv. program Field Ed requirement can begin in Fall, Spring, or Summer as long as it occurs over 9 consecutive months. To enroll, students must have made arrangements for an approved field education placement with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Full-time internship students can only take one other course per semester. [Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded]

Summer Internship (FE-1014)

Credits:3

Full-time on-site field education. Arranged in consultation and with approval of Community Engaged Learning faculty. Pass/Fail only. Internship to meet M.Div. program Field Ed requirement can begin in Fall, Spring, or Summer as long as it occurs over 9 consecutive months. To enroll, students must have made arrangements for an approved field education placement with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Full-time internship students can only take one other course per semester. [Faculty permission required; Auditors excluded]

FIELD EDUCATION LEVEL I, PART 1 (FE-1021)

Credits:0

This course introduces students to the fundamental skills required for supervised ministry. Students will learn processes of theological reflection for ministry and mission. They will develop their understanding of the vocation & mission of the ordained & laity in the Church and world, in light of Catholic teaching. They will also learn fundamental concepts and skills related to evangelization and collaborative ministry. Format: lecture & discussion (and a supervised ministry placement). Basis for Assessment: participation, written theological reflections, and completion of a Learning Contract. Course is normally taken Pass/Fail. This course is a prerequisite for Field Ed Level I, Part 2; the student will earn a total of 1.5 units of credit for Field Ed Level I, Parts 1 & 2 after passing both courses. Intended audience: DSPT MDiv students. Course meets at St. Albert Priory, 5890 Birch Court, Oakland.

MINISTRY IN CONTEXT II (FE-1146)

Credits:0

MDIV INTEGRATION SEMINAR I (FE-1152)

Credits:1.5

The Integration Seminar is guided by one of three themes for each year of the M. Div. degree: ministerial identity, ministerial praxis or ministerial integration. In the first year of the M. Div. program the seminar focuses upon the theme of ministerial identity. To this end, the fall semester seminar will explore the themes of vocational and ministerial calling, professional ministerial identity and collaborative leadership. The seminar also integrates aspects of Ignatian spirituality. The seminar provides the opportunity for students in the M. Div. seminar to support each other’s vocations, work together collaboratively, and build a cohort community. [JST 1st year M. Div. students.]

ANTI-RACISM TRAINING (FE-1200)

Credits:0

PROFESSIONAL BOUNDARIES (FE-1205)

Credits:0

TEACHING PARISH (FE-1220)

Credits:0

CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION (FE-2000)

Credits:6

Ministry to persons in pastoral care setting, participation in weekly individual and group reflection upon that ministry with supervisor, study of theoretical material from theology, the behavioral sciences, and pastoral care. Integrates theological understanding and knowledge of behavioral science into pastoral functioning. Taken at a CPE site approved by the ACPE (or other accrediting organization determined by Director of Community Engaged Learning as accepted by employers and/or denominations.) Program conducted under the supervision of an ACPE accredited supervisor. Student must submit CPE program acceptance letter in order to register. Supervisor reports progress to Community Engaged Learning faculty as requested and submits final evaluation to be placed in the student's permanent file for grade. Student must complete one CPE unit in 4-months or 9-consecutive months in order to receive 6 units of academic credit. Student can take CPE for 0 units of academic credit in order to have completion of CPE appear on their transcript. If CPE is taken to meet M. Div. program FE requirement, it must provide 1.0 CPE unit and can only be taken P/F. Otherwise, can be taken for letter grade or P/F. Students cannot retroactively receive credit for completed CPE. [Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded]

CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION (FE-2000)

Credits:12

Ministry to persons in pastoral care setting, participation in weekly individual and group reflection upon that ministry with supervisor, study of theoretical material from theology, the behavioral sciences, and pastoral care. Integrates theological understanding and knowledge of behavioral science into pastoral functioning. Taken at a CPE site approved by the ACPE (or other accrediting organization determined by Director of Community Engaged Learning as accepted by employers and/or denominations.) Program conducted under the supervision of an ACPE accredited supervisor. Student must submit CPE program acceptance letter in order to register. Supervisor reports progress to Field Education faculty as requested and submits final evaluation to be placed in the student's permanent file for grade. Student must complete one CPE unit in one semester or two consecutive semesters in order to receive 6 units of academic credit. Student can take CPE for 0 units of academic credit in order to have completion of CPE appear on their transcript. Course is available for 0-6 units. [Auditors excluded; faculty permission required] If CPE is taken to meet M. Div. program FE requirement, it can only be taken P/F and must be taken during consecutive Fall & Spring semesters. Otherwise, can be taken for letter grade or P/F.

ADVANCED FIELD EDUCATION II (FE-2011)

Credits:3

Advanced work in Field Education. Pass/Fail only. Prerequisites: FE 1005 and FE 1006. To enroll, students must have made arrangements for an approved field education placement with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Students will meet as a learning cohort twice a month for 1.5-2.0 hours with Field Education faculty. Date and time for the semester will be set at the orientation session on Jnauary 30, 2019 at 1:30 p.m. [FE 1005, FE 1006; Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded]

PASTORAL MINISTRY INTERNSHIP (FE-2021)

Credits:1.5

FIELD EDUCATION LEVEL II, PART 1: FALL SEMESTER INTERNSHIP. This course is part of students' year-long experience in a supervised pastoral ministry experience, through which they will (a) exercise basic skills of the apostolate, (b) engage in theological reflection upon it, and (c) document and communicate their learning about these areas. Each student is required to arrange for regular supervisory sessions with the approved supervisor at the ministry site. Requirements: In consultation with the on-site supervisor, the student must submit (a) a learning contract, (b) theological reflections demonstrating an integration of theological learning with pastoral experience, (c) documentation on apostolic skills. Permission the Director of Field Education is required. Course is normally taken Pass/Fail. This course is a prerequisite for Field Ed Level II, Part 2. Intended audience: DSPT MDiv students. Prerequisite: Field Ed Level I, Parts 1 & 2.

FIELD EDUCATION PLACEMENT I (FE-2091)

Credits:3

Theological Field Education Placement I is the first in a two-course sequence, each of which includes the weekly reading, on-line class engagement, participation in peer reflection groups via WebEx for 1.5 hours every other week, and a minimum of eight to ten hours in concurrent placement in an approved congregation or alternative organization relevant to a student’s vocational intentions. Student assignments include a learning covenant, theological reflection papers, participation in peer theological reflection, and an analytic description of the placement site that is prepared as an on-line presentation. Students enrolling in this course must have completed FE2190. [Faculty Consent required]

MDIV INTEGRATION SEMINAR II (FE-2152)

Credits:3

INTRO THEOLOGICAL FIELD ED I (FE-2180)

Credits:3

INTRO THEOLOGICAL FIELD ED II (FE-2181)

Credits:3

Introduction to Theological Field Education II is the second in a two-semester sequence, each of which includes the weekly expectation of two hours in class and eight to ten hours in concurrent placement in an approved congregation or alternative organization relevant to a student’s vocational intentions. Class time will be split into two sections: (1) lecture/discussion regarding frameworks and practices for leadership in congregations/organizations (2) theological reflection on experiences in placements sites. In addition to weekly reading, student assignments include a learning covenant, theological reflection papers, theological reflection in peer groups, and a congregational development project in their placement site which will also be presented to the class.. This class meet Wednesday morning from 9:30 - 11:30 AM.. [FE 2180; Faculty Consent required]

ADV CONCURRENT FIELD STUDY I (FE-2210)

Credits:3

Advanced work in Field Education. Pass/Fail only. Prerequisites: FE 1005 and FE 1006. To enroll, students must have made arrangements for an approved field education placement with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Students will meet as a learning cohort twice a month for 1.5-2.0 hours with Community Engaged Learning faculty. Date and time for the semester will be set at the orientation session on Wednesday, 9/4/2019, 1:30 pm, at PSR Holbrook 133 or 134. [FE 1005, FE 1006; Faculty Permission required; Auditors excluded]

ADV CONCURRENT FIELD STUDY II (FE-2211)

Credits:3

Advanced work in Field Education. Pass/Fail only. Prerequisites: FE 1005 and FE 1006. To enroll, students must have made arrangements for an approved field education placement with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Students will meet as a learning cohort twice a month for 1.5-2.0 hours with Field Education faculty. Date and time for the semester will be set at the orientation session on Jnauary 30, 2019 at 1:30 p.m. Course is available for 1.5-3 units. [FE 1005, FE 1006; Faculty Permission required; Auditors excluded]

MCL INTERNSHIP FALL (FE-2231)

Credits:3

This is the course number for the Fall semester internship in the Master of Community Leadership degree at ABSW. Students must consult with the ABSW Director of Contextual Education prior to the beginning of the semester, to plan their internships in ministry or community settings.

MCL INTERNSHIP SPRING (FE-2232)

Credits:3

This is the course number for the Spring semester internship in the Master of Community Leadership degree at ABSW. Students must consult with the ABSW Director of Contextual Education prior to the beginning of the semester, to plan their internships in ministry or community settings.

CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION (FE-2250)

Credits:0

THEOLOGY OF MINISTRY PRACTICUM (FE-2620)

Credits:6

FIELD ED LEVEL III PART 1 (FE-3021)

Credits:0

FIELD EDUCATION LEVEL III, PART 1: Through a two-semester apostolic placement, students will deepen their engagement in (a) fundamental skills required for supervised ministry, (b) theological reflection for ministry and mission, (c) their understanding of the vocation & mission of the ordained & laity in the Church and world, in light of Catholic teaching, and (d) fundamental concepts and skills related to evangelization and collaborative ministry. Format: an approved, supervised ministry placement, normally involving 1.5-3.0 hours per week, with occasional contact with the Field Ed Director. Basis for Assessment: completion of a Learning Contract, written theological reflections, and documentation of apostolic skill learning. Course is normally taken Pass/Fail. This course is a prerequisite for Field Ed Level III, Part 2; the student will earn a total of 1.5 units of credit for Field Ed Level III, Parts 1, 2, 3, & 4 after passing the four courses. Intended audience: DSPT MDiv students. Prerequisite: Field Ed Level II, Parts 1 & 2. Course meets at St. Albert Priory in Oakland.

INTERNSHIP (FE-4011)

Credits:9

The internship provides a supervised ministry context in which the student develops and hones gifts and skills for ministerial leadership. The internship experience is designed to integrate studies and form MDiv students in the art of ministry--an interactive learning process reflecting the Spirit's work of weaving together the person that God has created and called in Christ through the practice of ministry, theological reflection, spiritual formation, constructive feedback, critique and evaluation. Course is available for 1-9 units. [Faculty Consent required]

CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION (FE-4012)

Credits:10

This course is for Starr King students engaged in part-time or full-time Clinical Pastoral Education. Participate in ministry to persons in crisis and engage in individual and group reflection. Didactic sessions draw together theoretical material from theology, the behavioral sciences, and pastoral care. Students learn to integrate theological understanding and knowledge of behavioral science with pastoral functioning. Upon completion, a written evaluation from the program supervisor will be placed into the student's permanent file. Discuss CPE with your advisor and then faculty. Final evaluation from CPE supervisor needs to be sent to faculty by the last day of the semester to receive credit. Students are responsible for applying for and securing a place in a CPE program. Please check the SKSM Student Handbook for more information. Relates to SKSM Threshold 5 and MFC Competency 2. Course is available from 1-10 units. [15 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

CONGREGATIONAL FIELDWORK FALL (FE-4050)

Credits:4

Fieldwork is an opportunity to put into action the theory learned in the classroom. Working in a congregation gives the student a chance to develop their unique pastoral voice while navigating complexities of a congregation’s history, culture, systems and ethos. Fieldwork placements may include: teaching a religious education class for children or adults, working with a youth group, serving on a pastoral care team, and more. All congregational field work students meet monthly by Zoom to discuss learning goals and monthly learning themes with the professor. The professor's final evaluations of work is determined by monthly Zoom participation and the student's final assessment of their work. This course is for M.Div. students and may fulfill UU ministry requirements. Depending on the focus of the field work project, it can relate to the following Starr King Threshold Areas: Life in Religious Community and Interfaith Engagement, Prophetic Witness and Work, Spiritual Practice and Care for the Soul, Educating for Wholeness and Liberation, and Embodied Wisdom and Beauty. Requires approval from faculty advisor. This course is available for 1-4 units. [Faculty Consent required, Auditors excluded]

CONGREGATIONAL FIELD WORK (FE-4053)

Credits:3

COMMUNITY FIELDWORK FALL (FE-4060)

Credits:5

COMMUNITY FIELD WORK (FE-4063)

Credits:5

PARISH INTERNSHIP FALL (FE-4210)

Credits:10

This is a 10 month full-time (one year, 10 credits/semester) or part-time (two years, 5 credits/semester) ministry experience in a teaching congregation, under the supervision of a Minister in Final Fellowship (for UU students), working with an intern committee, and a professor at the school. For nonUU students, check with your denominational body to see if there are additional requirements for the congregational internship experience. Those who register for this course must also register for Congregational Intern Reflection Fall. This course is for M.Div students. The Intern Ministers meet monthly by Zoom to discuss progress on Learning Goals. UU students will use the UUA Internship Evaluation forms. During the Internship experience, there are opportunities for all 8 Starr King Threshold Areas to be explored, as well as the UU Ministerial Fellowship Committee Competency Areas. This course is available for 5-10 units.

PARISH INTERN REFLECTION FALL (FE-4212)

Credits:2

COMMUNITY INTERNSHIP FALL (FE-4220)

Credits:10

COMMUNITY INTERN REFLECTN FALL (FE-4222)

Credits:2

STL RESEARCH PRACTICUM (FE-4400)

Credits:0.5

STD RESEARCH PRACTICUM (FE-4401)

Credits:0.5

THM RESEARCH PRACTICUM (FE-4402)

Credits:0.5

INTERNSHIP (FE-4450)

Credits:6

THEOLOGICAL FIELD EDUCATION PLACEMENT I (FE-8291)

Credits:3

CHI IMMERSION SPIRIT PSYCH 1 (FEFT-1104)

Credits:1.5

For joint-program students participating in Chaplaincy Institute (ChI) modules as part of the Interfaith Studies Certificate. This is the first in a series of 2 modules (Pt. II offered in December). Modules must be taken consecutively. The Interfaith Spiritual Psychology intensives provide students with a holistic model of psycho-spiritual development that can be used for personal growth and for work with others. Curriculum integrates wisdom from various spiritual traditions: Kabbalah with Jungian, Developmental and Archetypal Psychology, Family Systems and Psychodynamic perspectives, as well as Astrology and alchemy. This course is only for students who have been admitted to the SKSM-ChI joint program and is not available to other SKSM students or to students from other GTU schools. This course does not count toward residency requirements. Classes held Oct. 17-21, approximately 9am-5:00pm (Typically includes 1 evening class). Relates to SKSM Thresholds 5, 1, 8; MFC Competencies 2, 3, 1 [15 max enrollment]

CHI IMMERSION SPIRIT PSYCH 2 (FEFT-1105)

Credits:1.5

For joint-program students participating in Chaplaincy Institute (ChI) modules as part of the Interfaith Studies Certificate. This is the second in of a 2 module series (Pt I is offered in Sept; modules must be taken consecutively). This training integrates wisdom from various spiritual tradition: Kabbalah, Jungian, Developmental & Archetypal Psychology, Family Systems & Psychodynamic perspectives, as well as Astrology & alchemy. After foundational work on Ego Development and Identity formation n Part One, Part Two explores Soul & Spiritual Development more fully. This course is only for students who have been admitted to the SKSM-ChI joint program and is not available to other SKSM students or to students from other GTU schools. This course does not count toward residency requirements. Classes held Dec 12-16, approximately 9am-5: 30pm (typically includes 1 evening session). Relates to SKSM Thresholds 5, 8; MFC Competencies 2, 3. [12 max enrollment]

CHI IMMERSION JUDAISM (FEFT-1106)

Credits:1.5

For joint-program students participating in Chaplaincy Institute (ChI) modules as part of the Interfaith Studies Certificate. Students will explore the sacred texts and aspects of spiritual care particular to Judaism, as well as attend a local Shabbat service. Other areas of study will include: the importance of research in spiritual care; officiating at weddings; and an introduction to spirituality and aging. The Community & Social Transformation (CMT) curriculum will examine social change theory as a tool for justice. This course is only for students who have been admitted to the SKSM-ChI joint program and is not available to other SKSM students or to students from other GTU schools. This course does not count toward residency requirements. Classes held Sept. 12-16 from approximately 9am-5pm (usually includes 1 evening). Relates to SKSM Thresholds 1, 5, and 3; MFC Competencies 1, 2. [15 max enrollment]

CHI IMMERSION HINDUISM & SIKHISM (FEFT-1107)

Credits:1.5

For joint-program students participating in Chaplaincy Institute (ChI) modules as part of the Interfaith Studies Certificate. In addition to the big picture view of Hindu and Sikh traditions and beliefs in class, more of this month's learning will be through immersion, with visits to a Sikh and Hindu temples. Other classes this module include spiritual care at end-of-life, spiritual care with those on the margins, and an introduction to grief & loss. This course is only for students who have been admitted to the SKSM-ChI joint program and is not available to other SKSM students or to students from other GTU schools. This course does not count toward residency requirements. Classes held Nov. 14-18, approximately 9am-5pm (typically includes 1 evening session). Relates to SKSM Thresholds 5, 1, 3, 7; MFC Competencies 1, 3, 4. [15 max enrollment]

SOC CHG FIELD/IMMERS ELECTIVE (FERS-3000)

Credits:3

CSSC & MAST programs field work arranged in consultation and with approval of the Director of Community Engaged Learning. To enroll, students must have had consultation with Field Education faculty about planned project with broad sector or area of interest focus and confirmed mentor active in that field. Student must establish a schedule of twice-monthly consultations with FE faculty over semester to discuss project status. Depending on number of students enrolled, Field Education faculty may assign twice-monthly learning cohort meetings. [Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded]

SOCIAL CHANGE FIELD WORK CAPSTONE (FERS-3001)

Credits:3

Required course for MAST program. CSSC and MAST students attend combined class in spring semester. Field work arranged in consultation and with approval of the Director of Community Engaged Learning. To enroll, students must have had consultation with Field Education faculty about planned project with broad sector or area of interest focus and confirmed mentor active in that field. Participants collaborate with each other, the faculty instructor, and their mentors to draft learning objectives and establish criteria for assessing the outcomes of their field work and immersion experiences. Participants meet together in person twice monthly on the 2nd & 4th Thursday during the semester and provide regular progress reports online through a dedicated website. Participants will submit a final project in this course (such as a vocational plan, a social venture proposal, an educational and/or spiritual formation module for community organizing, among others) based on their field work/immersion experiences geared toward a specific area of social change. Draft iterations of the project are submitted online throughout the semester for feedback from colleagues, mentors, and the faculty instructor. Classes at the end of the semester are used to present their final projects and solicit observations and proposals for next steps. [SPFT 1082 (8182), FTRS 2973; Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded] Class meets: 2nd & 4th Thursday, 2/7/2019-5/16/2019, 1:00pm-4:00pm; Project Presentation on Wednesday, 5/1/2019, 4:00pm-8:00pm at PSR Bade Museum.

MAST SOCIAL CHANGE FIELD WORK (FERS-3002)

Credits:3

Required course for MAST and MDiv program for students in Stackable Curriculum. Field work arranged in consultation and with approval of the Director of Community Engaged Learning. To enroll, students must have had consultation with CEL faculty about planned project with broad sector or area of interest focus and confirmed mentor active in that field. Participants collaborate with each other, the faculty instructor, and their mentors to draft learning objectives and establish criteria for assessing the outcomes of their field work and immersion experiences. Participants meet together with Faculty twice monthly on the 2nd & 4th Thursday during the semester and provide regular progress reports. Participants meet together twice monthly as cohort for 3-hours to discuss projects, day & time TBD by cohort. Participants will submit a final project in this course (such as a vocational plan, a social venture proposal, an educational and/or spiritual formation module for community organizing, among others) based on their field work/immersion experiences geared toward a specific area of social change. Students are also required to complete a 6-8 page paper: Social Analysis of Social Change Field Work Setting/Context. [SPFT 1082 (8182); FTRS 2973; Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded] Course Times: 2nd & 4th Thursday 1-4PM. Course Dates: Sept 5, Sept 19, Oct 3, Oct 17, Nov 7, Nov 21, Dec 5, Dec 12.

SPIRITUAL FORMATION (FT-1026)

Credits:0

PASTORING FOR PROPHETIC ADVOCACY (FT-1057)

Credits:1

INTERDISCIPLINARY LECTURES (FT-1062)

Credits:1.5

FOUNDATIONS FOR MINISTRY (FT-1063)

Credits:3

SPIRITUAL FORMATION (FT-1066)

Credits:0

[Not available for cross-registration] This course is designed to help students cultivate and gain knowledge of spiritual practices that foster lively faith and healthy leadership that can build up the Christian faith and ministry of individuals and communities in an Anglican context. Over the course of several semesters, students will cultivate spiritual practices that will sustain them in their vocations, and skills that enable them to engage communities in spiritual work; develop spiritual practices that support their faithful life as Christian disciples; recognize how habitual spiritual practices may foster resilience and faith; learn how to teach holistic Christian formation practices to others; integrate rhythms of communal worship into life habits; and learn to recognize the challenging tension between community responsibility, personal self-care, and time apart for rest and retreat. Course activities include: residential student formation retreat, monthly formation group meetings, peer one-on-one meetings, engagement in spiritual direction, participation in worship and a quiet day. This course is required each semester for all CDSP Residential MDiv, MTS, and CAS students.

SPIRITUAL FORMATION (FT-1067)

Credits:0

[Not available for cross-registration] This course is designed to help students cultivate and gain knowledge of spiritual practices that foster lively faith and healthy leadership that can build up the Christian faith and ministry of individuals and communities. Over the course of several semesters, students will cultivate spiritual practices that will sustain them in their vocations, and skills that enable them to engage communities in spiritual work; develop spiritual practices that support their faithful life as Christian disciples; recognize how habitual spiritual practices may foster resilience and faith; learn how to teach holistic Christian formation practices to others; integrate rhythms of communal worship into life habits; and learn to recognize the challenging tension between community responsibility, personal self-care, and time apart for rest and retreat. Course activities include: engagement in spiritual direction; participation in worship; participation in formation peer groups. This course is required each semester for all CDSP MTS students

WRITING FOR GRAD THEO STUDIES (FT-1075)

Credits:1.5

This course will examine writing genres and skills central to graduate theological study. Within their degree programs, students already produce many different kinds of writing, such as personal reflection papers, analyses of case studies, and research papers. This course aims to orient students to these various genres and their distinctive purposes. We will identify key conventions of common academic and theological genres. We will also identify and practice methods of reading and writing that will help students write effectively throughout their coursework. Special attention will be given to two important and importantly different genres: the theological reflection and the academic research paper. Additional genres and writing practices studied will be selected based on student interest. Through writing exercises, workshops of student writing, and discussions of exemplars, students will develop, reflect on, and refine their abilities to communicate clear and complex ideas for their seminary studies and beyond. Meeting times TBD.

THEOLOGICAL WRITING I (FT-1109)

Credits:1.5

First semester of a required course for entering ABSW seminarians - open to other GTU students. Students will learn skills of academic writing, critical analysis, and articulation of objectives. Writing samples and instructor feedback integrate theory and praxis.

GRADUATE THEOLOGICAL WRITING (FT-1111)

Credits:1.5

Second semester of a required course for entering ABSW seminarians - open to other GTU students. Students will learn skills of academic writing, critical analysis, and articulation of objectives. Writing samples and instructor feedback integrate theory and praxis.

CHURCH LEADERSHIP (FT-1130)

Credits:3

To prepare as ministry leaders in the 21st century, students will be exposed to new paradigms of church leadership. This introductory course designed to provide Masters of Divinity Students with basic principles of church as non-profit administration and management including navigating boards and organizational structures as systems, understanding budgets, assessing organizational capacity, developing staff and /or laity, and understanding social location (i.e,. contextual /cultural dynamics of the neighborhood and community). Students will learn organizational concepts, such as transformational leadership, adaptive change, conflict resolution, fund development, and member equipping. Course will include periodic papers and as a final project - an organizational assessment.

SPANISH FOR WORSHIP I (FT-1145)

Credits:1.5

SPANISH FOR WORSHIP II (FT-1146)

Credits:1.5

Spanish for Worship II is a course on Spanish language acquisition focused on worship leadership in Spanish. This course builds and expands on the grammatical and practical work covered in Spanish for Worship I, a prerequisite for this course. This course will include, among other things, class discussions on biblical material, discussions on selections from Luther’s Small Catechism, liturgical presentation projects, a visit to a Spanish-speaking worship service, and the production and sharing of a statement of faith written in Spanish. [FT-1145 Spanish for Worship I; 30 max enrollment]

ACAD THEO WRITING & RESEARCH (FT-1203)

Credits:2

This course is a general introduction to the tasks of conducting research in order to write academic theological arguments. The course focuses on honing the skills you already have in order to research more efficiently, and writing more precisely in a theological setting (papers, sermons, bible studies, etc.). Prerequisite: RSFT-1120 Methods and Hermeneutics I. This course is offered as a two-week intensive starting the week of January 14, 2019 and ending the week of January 21, 2019. Meets Monday-Friday, 8:10am-11:10am, at PSR 6. [30 max enrollment]

ORGANIZING FOR PUBLIC MINISTRY (FT-1239)

Credits:3

This course focuses on developing skills, tools, and theoretical/reflective capacity for community organizing around multiple issues within a ministry context, and is taught by a team of experienced trainers from the Industrial Areas Foundation (IAF), the nation's oldest network of faith-based and community organizations, with additional theological reflection and context provided by a CDSP professor. Format will include lectures, discussion, role-play, small group work, and reading. For those taking the course for academic credit, additional reading and writing are required. The course is open to all members of the seminary community and will also include local non-credit participants from community organizing projects. Class meets daily, 1/20/19-1/25/19, from 8:30am to 5:30pm at CDSP.

LEADERSHIP IN MINISTRY (FT-1902)

Credits:1.5

Leadership in Ministry (FT-1902)

Credits:3

An introduction to a variety of multi-disciplinary tools for leadership in ministry. Through shared learning and case studies, together with theological reflection on our own practices, we will develop the courage and imagination needed for leadership. Pre-course readings, lecture, discussion, case studies. Evaluation: class participation, final paper. Audience: Low-residency students.

SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION IN ACTION (FT-1927)

Credits:1.5

Under the PSR Stackable Curriculum, every student will engage in experiential learning during the intersession of their first or second year. Students will engage with the principles of community organizing and transformational change within a theological and social justice framework. Course begins with readings, lectures, and discussions. 3-4 Bay Area social justice organizations and movements will present opportunities for onsite work in various topic areas. Once students select a site, they will participate for 24 hours of experiential learning work, then re-convene for final discussions, summary, and closing. Students following Stackable Curriculum programs get priority registration; others may participate as space is available.

Course Meets:

Wednesday, 1/15/20, Thursday, 1/16/20, Friday, 1/17/20, & Tuesday, 1/21/20, from 10am - 2pm in Holbrook 133

Saturday, 1/18/20, - Monday, 1/20/20: Students will meet in small cohorts and do 25 hours of Field Work within pre-identified organizations.

PRESBYTERIAN (PCUSA) POLITY (FT-2070)

Credits:3

VITAL WORSHIP IN THE 21ST CEN (FT-2172)

Credits:3

Worship is the portal through which visitors find a spiritual home, members grow to greater discipleship and the whole congregation is inspired to "go and do likewise" in the world. The need is great for vital worship at the epicenter of congregational life. This core worship course for MDiv, MA/MTS, or DMin students will explore not only theology and history of worship as well as ritual theory, but also the depths of spirituality, excellence of practice in sensory-rich communication and intentional preparation needed by leaders of the 21st century church for worship that revitalizes congregations. Course is a combination of lecture, discussion, and practice. Evaluation is based on written papers and practical projects. Class will meet in person every two (2) weeks with brief online reflections on readings due every week.

VITAL WORSHIP IN THE 21ST CEN (FT-2172)

Credits:3

Worship is the portal through which visitors find a spiritual home, members grow to greater discipleship and the whole congregation is inspired to "go and do likewise" in the world. The need is great for vital worship at the epicenter of congregational life. This core worship course for MDiv, MA/MTS, or DMin students will explore not only theology and history of worship as well as ritual theory, but also the depths of spirituality, excellence of practice in sensory-rich communication and intentional preparation needed by leaders of the 21st century church for worship that revitalizes congregations. Course is a combination of lecture, discussion, and practice. Evaluation is based on written papers and practical projects. Class will meet in person every two (2) weeks with brief online reflections on readings due every week.

XN FTH FRMTN:PEDGIES & PRACTS (FT-2255)

Credits:1.5

This course will explore theological understandings of leadership, various styles of leadership and their effectiveness in different settings, dynamics of power and appropriate professional boundaries, and the practical skills needed to run a small non-profit such as a church parish. Students will engage material on these subjects through course readings, class discussions, reflection papers, and a group project and presentation. Required for PLTS M.Div. students prior to internship. This course is offered as a seven-week intensive starting the week of April 1, 2019 and ending the week of May 13, 2019. Meets Thursdays 1:45-5:00pm. [30 max enrollment]

PUBLIC THEOLOGY INTERNSHIP (FT-2542)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by LeAnn Flesher and Michael Mathews. This is the fifth of five courses in the Public Theology Certificate Program. In this course students will participate in a semester long internship in which they will work with a carefully selected mentor that has expertise in the student’s area of interest. Class Meeting Dates: (fall 2018): September 7--BBQ w/ mentors and cohort #2 (6:00 pm); October 12--Cohort #1 meets to share mentorship experiences (7:00 to 9:00 pm); December 7--Final meeting & celebration; Cohort #1 creates public presentation of project--the wider community invited (there will be food)--6:00-8:00 pm.

CHURCH ADMINISTRATION AS MINISTRY (FT-2820)

Credits:3

Ministry is relational. This is crucial in all areas of parish administration-budgets, pledge drives, fundraisers, building campaigns, staff supervision, volunteer support, facilities, safety, long-range planning. We will consider ministerial balance and boundaries. What is the pastor's role? Where to prod and when to defer to lay leaders? When to hold a program or a committee together or let it fall apart? How to hire staff and what to pay? We will interview some experts (who learned the hard way). In discussions and papers, we will reflect on articles, books, case studies, videos, sermons and presentations based on your needs, goals and gifts. Open to UUs and other students on an ordination track. [Faculty Consent required; 21 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

ORGNZTNL LEADRSHP CH & COMMNTY (FT-2923)

Credits:3

DISCIPLES HISTORY AND POLITY (FT-3150)

Credits:3

Utilizing historical, theological and cultural methods and approaches, this class will survey and examine the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), from its founding two centuries ago to its contemporary expressions. The course will explore the present design and functioning (polity) of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in its congregational, regional, and general manifestations. We will analyze the theological roots and developments of the Disciples tradition, and discuss the directions of mission, ministry, and ecumenism within the contemporary witness and work of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). This course fulfills the denominational requirement in Disciples history and polity for ordination. The course is designed for M.Div. students seeking ordination, but others may enroll.

21ST CENTURY EVANGELISM (FT-3950)

Credits:1.5

This course introduces the theological and practical dimensions of evangelism in the context of the 21st century and with special emphasis on the United Methodist Church. We shall investigate the theological basis of the Christian evangelistic message and think together about the ways this message can be shared in our present reality. Class format: seminar, lecture/class-discussion. Evaluation method: attendance and participation, small reflection papers, book review, and final paper. Course meets daily, 1/22/19-1/25/19, from 8:10am-12:30pm at PSR 5.

SPIRITUAL FORMATION (FT-8126)

Credits:0

SPIRITUAL FORMATION (FT-8166)

Credits:0

VITAL WORSHIP IN THE 21ST CEN (FT-8217)

Credits:3

Worship is the portal through which visitors find a spiritual home, members grow to greater discipleship and the whole congregation is inspired to "go and do likewise" in the world. The need is great for vital worship at the epicenter of congregational life. This core worship course for MDiv, MA/MTS, or DMin students will explore not only theology and history of worship as well as ritual theory, but also the depths of spirituality, excellence of practice in sensory-rich communication and intentional preparation needed by leaders of the 21st century church for worship that revitalizes congregations. Course is a combination of lecture, discussion, and practice. Evaluation is based on written papers and practical projects. Coursework during the semester is a combination of video lectures, reading, brief online reflections, and five (5) video conference link check-ins.

RITUAL PRACTICE AND CURATING A LIFE OF DEPTH FOR "NONES" (FT-8250)

Credits:1.5

Research points to increased diversity in the US population when it comes to "spirituality." Many are finding meaning in ways that do not involve traditional religious affiliations–as the term “Nones” describes. This course will look creatively at the ways that life-passage ritual practices and activities for curating a life of depth might be articulated for the religiously unaffiliated. A live and recorded videoconference at the beginning and end of the semester (scheduled according to the availability of the participants enrolled) will bookend an independent study format wherein students choose from a list of research materials, find their own materials related to their inquiry, and share their findings online with other participants. Optional opportunities will be offered to be part of creative projects related to this topic with the instructor, live or online.

WRESTLING WITH THE QUESTIONS (FTBS-5000)

Credits:3

Wrestling with the Questions: The Bible, Midrash, and Inquiry Based Preaching: “Why?” asks the persistent two-year old, having discovered one of the most powerful words in the English language. Contemporary pedagogy recognizes that helping students develop their own questions, can help deepen learning much more than providing well-rehearsed answers. But the value of questions is not new. From Abraham to Jesus, the biblical story turns on the questions. “Am I my brother’s keeper?” “Who is my neighbor?” In studying texts, the ancient Rabbis developed the Jewish tradition of Midrash, which uses questions to help the faithful reader slow down and live more fully into the sacred story. Drawing on the Scripture’s art of staying with the questions and the Jewish tradition of Midrash, we will explore an “inquiry based” approach to preaching. Format and Evaluation: One week intensive with preliminary activity on-line for all students. 1.5 credits evaluated through a Midrash on a text (due after the course). 3.0 credits will do additional on-line activity after the course, evaluated through 5 sermon series outline, Midrash and video/audio/manuscript on one inquiry based sermon (due after the course) Audience: DMin and pastors seeking Continuing Education Units (2 units) May take for 3.0 or 1.5 units.

Wrestling with the Questions (FTBS-5900)

Credits:3

Wrestling with the Questions: The Bible, Midrash, and Inquiry Based Preaching: “Why?” asks the persistent two-year old, having discovered one of the most powerful words in the English language. Contemporary pedagogy recognizes that helping students develop their own questions, can help deepen learning much more than providing well-rehearsed answers. But the value of questions is not new. From Abraham to Jesus, the biblical story turns on the questions. “Am I my brother’s keeper?” “Who is my neighbor?” In studying texts, the ancient Rabbis developed the Jewish tradition of Midrash, which uses questions to help the faithful reader slow down and live more fully into the sacred story. Drawing on the Scripture’s art of staying with the questions and the Jewish tradition of Midrash, we will explore an “inquiry based” approach to preaching. Format and Evaluation: One week intensive with preliminary activity on-line for all students. 1.5 credits evaluated through a Midrash on a text (due after the course). 3.0 credits will do additional on-line activity after the course, evaluated through 5 sermon series outline, Midrash and video/audio/manuscript on one inquiry based sermon (due after the course) Audience: DMin and pastors seeking Continuing Education Units (2 units) May take for 3.0 or 1.5 units.

INDIGENOUS BODIES (FTCE-1200)

Credits:3

PRISON MINISTRY PRACTICUM (FTCE-2573)

Credits:1

This course offers both a theoretical and experiential introduction to prison ministry with an emphasis on the unique theological, psychosocial and ministerial needs of the incarcerated. Students will study the historical roots of correctional chaplaincy in the United States, professional ethics, prison culture, racism, gender issues in prison ministry and restorative justice alternatives to incarceration. The course will focus on practical tools needed for successful prison ministry. As a contextual theology course it will be offered entirely on site at San Quentin State Prison. Inmates will participate in lectures, discussion of readings, role-playing exercises and theological reflection. Course meets Fridays, 11/2, 11/9, 11/16, 11/30 and 12/7/18 from 12:40-3:30pm. [7 max enrollment]

UU MINISTERIAL LEADERSHIP (FTED-2100)

Credits:3

UU Polity (FTHS-4077)

Credits:1.5

UU POLITY (FTHS-4077)

Credits:1.5

UU BALTIMORE IMMERSION (FTHS-4079)

Credits:3

LITURGY PREP & LAY PRESIDING (FTLS-3216)

Credits:3

CELEBRATIONAL STYLE (FTLS-4725)

Credits:3

This course is designed to acquaint students preparing for presbyteral ordination in the Roman Catholic Church with the principle rites of the Church's liturgy. Its goal is to develop prayerful leaders of prayer and to develop in presiders the necessary skills for gathering the ecclesial body and celebrating the sacramental rites of the Church. Students will prepare and preside at rites and will also work together on larger liturgical rites. Small group gatherings outside of class for 1 ½ hours a week will enable more familiarity and personal critique. [Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded]

GOSPEL OF THE MASSES (FTRS-2100)

Credits:3

Gospel of the Masses: Seeing God Through the Eyes of the Marginalized. This is an immersion course that engages with both the persecution and resilience of marginalized people in the United States. We will spend most of our class time on the streets of Oakland, observing, listening, and analyzing the intersectionality of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and immigration status in perpetuating generational marginalization. We will have the privilege to listen and learn from various communities of color - community members, justice practitioners, activists, and local theologians and ministers. We will also pay close attention to the sacred movement of God and the deep spirituality of marginalized people in our observations and interactions. Assignments include pre-course readings and summary/reflection papers, and an 8-page minimum post-course reflection paper. A $100 program fee will be assessed for each student and lunch will be provided daily. Class meets: Sunday, 1/13/2019, from 10:00am to 3:00pm; then daily, 1/14/2019-1/18/2019, from 9:00am to 5:00pm; in Oakland.

LEADERSHIP FOR MINISTRY I (FTRS-2281)

Credits:3

LEADERSHIP FOR MINISTRY II (FTRS-2282)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Caroline McCall and Susanna Singer. This is the second half of a two-semester capstone course sequence for graduating CDSP MDiv students. It can be taken as an elective by studnets in other programs. This course will involve constructive practical work on ministry leadership., including theological reflection, contextual analysis, training in models of leadership, evangelism, congregational development, church administration, finances and fundraising, and the spirituality of ministry. An integral part of this course is a placement in a congregation or institution, including 4-5 hours per week spent on site. Lecture/presentations, discussion and several small individual projects, plus one major group project. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment]

TRANSFORMATIVE LEADERSHIP (FTRS-2973)

Credits:3

Transformational Leadership entails a dynamic relationship between the leader and the community of which the leader is a part. It entails developing strategies that enhance the probability of achieving shared goals & visions. In the quest for a more just and compassionate world transformational leadership challenges dormant systems of oppression. The course explores various expressions of transformational leadership resulting from prophetic imagination and social entrepreneurship. Seminar format, evaluation through class participation, reflection papers and other papers. Audience: MAST, MDiv, MA/MTS, DMin.

DESIGN THINKING FOR SOCIAL CHANGE (FTRS-3400)

Credits:1.5

"Design Thinking" is a human-centered approach to problem solving and new product development that emerged from the high-tech, entrepreneurial world of Silicon Valley. It has evolved over the years into a process that is rooted in community-based research, ongoing testing of assumptions, a resistance to immediate answers for the sake of deeper insights, and hypothesizing future consequences. This course introduces the design thinking model with leading design thinking consultants--including an interactive workshop in which students collaborate on a realistic design challenge--and opportunities to adapt this model for leadership skills in both congregational settings and non-profit organizations for effective social change strategies. The class meets on six Saturdays (in addition to outside research and coaching sessions): 3/2 (8:30-10:30am); 3/16 (8:30am-5:30pm); 4/6 (8:30am-12:30pm); 4/27 (3:00-4:30pm), 5/11 (8:30am-12:30pm); and 5/18 (8:30am-12:30pm).

ENGAGING COMMUN OF LIBERATION (FTRS-3834)

Credits:3

This immersion course in Cuernavaca, Mexico, will explore communities of liberation in modern Mexico, focusing on the LGBTQ and women’s communities and on issues of economic justice within Mexico and between Mexico and the United States. Students will develop their knowledge of written, spoken and read Spanish through language classes and immersive living experience with native Spanish speakers. The program will include multiple field trips to sites of cultural and artistic importance, lectures on related topics, and dialogue with community members. Some knowledge of Spanish is suggested but not required. Application required - see https://tinyurl.com/2019-PSR-MEX for application and due dates. Faculty may request interview. Limited number of participants, open to community members/auditors. There will be 2-3 required pre-trip classroom sessions during Fall 2018 semester for both academic discussion & logistics. Course meets 1/5/19-1/19/19. [Faculty consent required; interview required; Auditors with faculty permission]

Community Organizing I & II (FTRS-4501)

Credits:3

Community Organizing: Session I & II Faith and Community Organizing: Prophets, Power, and Social Transformation. Now more than ever, we need creative, determined and spiritually- and morally--rooted organizers to aid in the work of building strong, resilient and responsive communities. These uncertain times demand a new generation of community leaders – religious and not – who are morally grounded, relationship focused, and skillful at building and using community power. From these strong foundations, individuals become more able to carry out the work of social movements – the large waves of change that mark this time as a moment for resistance. In this class, we will examine and try out several different models of organizing, explore our own personal paths to and styles of leadership, look at the unique and urgent work facing today's prophetic leaders, and uncover ways to build and re-build community life (based in spiritual teaching and practice) that lead to needed social change. Throughout this class, we will delve into some traditional as well as some new ways of thinking about community organizing in and outside of faith contexts. We will also take a look at the difference between community organizing and social movements, and understand how congregations and other community institutions can be anchors in helping individuals make meaning in the rapidly-changing, politically-charged moment in which we live. Each interactive session will combine discussion of organizing theory and impact with practical skill-building. Students will be challenged to read, reflect, write, and put teachings into action in mini-organizing campaigns. This course is designed for students, former students, and community partners who are serious about integrating social justice into their leadership, who want to learn how to use organizing as a congregational or community development tool, and/or who want to better understand the role that faith communities can (and need to) play in movements for social change. Course meets weekdays, 6/04/18 - 6/15/18, from 9am-1pm.

LEADERSHIP FOR MINISTRY (FTRS-8288)

Credits:3

LEADERSHIP FOR MINISTRY II (FTRS-8289)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Caroline McCall and Susanna Singer. This is the first half of a two-semester capstone course sequence for graduating CDSP MDiv students. It can be taken as an elective by students in other programs. This course will involve constructive practical work on ministry leadership, including theological reflection, discerning and securing a specific call in ministry, training in models of leadership, evangelism, congregational development, and the spirituality of ministry. An integral part of this course is a placement in a congregation or institution, including 5 hours per week spent on site. On-line lecture/presentations and discussions and several small individual projects/papers, plus one major group project. Students are expected to arrange synchronous on-line meetings for peer theological reflection for at least one hour every other week. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment]

IGNITING VIBRANT VENTURES (FTRS-8300)

Credits:3

This course is a hands-on experiential learning journey designed to encourage, empower, and equip participants to imagine both congregational ministry and organizational leadership through the lens of social entrepreneurship. The primary instructor of this course, Manuel Maqueda, is an experienced (social) entrepreneur, business executive, and former corporate lawyer who now specializes in revenue models for meaning-making organizations. This course is offered for both emerging and established leaders and will help them to design, plan, and implement social business models as they advance their congregational and/or organizational mission. Similar to “boot-camp” training in storied Silicon Valley incubators, this course will emphasize market-driven strategies for revenue generation but with two important twists: 1) we will focus on meaning-driven businesses, which in addition to making money create a tangible, measurable, positive social and environmental impact in the world; and 2) we will discover and develop our “inner technologies,” using positive psychology, mindfulness, and other techniques to hone our leadership skills as meaning-driven entrepreneurs.

The course meets on Thursday evenings from 5:30 to 8:30pm as a synchronous online course (we are online together via Zoom but also gathering in person for those who are on campus).