Course Information

 

for To Be Determined Department


BASIC GREEK I (BS-1002)

Credits:3

Introduction to basic grammar and vocabulary needed to begin reading biblical Greek. This course or the equivalent is a prerequisite for Basic Greek II, the intensive course given during January Intersession.

BASIC GREEK I (BS-1002)

Credits:3

Introduction to basic grammar and vocabulary needed to begin reading biblical Greek. This course or the equivalent is a prerequisite for Basic Greek II, the intensive course given during January Intersession.

BASIC GREEK II (BS-1003)

Credits:3

Intensive introduction to working with the Greek text of the NT; assumes familiarity with the Greek alphabet and some basic volcabulary and grammatical concepts. Class dates TBD at SFTS.

NT GREEK I: AN INTRODUCTION (BS-1020)

Credits:3

The first part of a two-semester course introducing the skills required to read and interpret New Testament texts in the original Greek. Basic and intermediate grammar and vocabulary on the focus, with an emphasis on acquiring the tools to sight-read texts. Grades will be based on class participation, quizzes, and midterm and final exams. This course is taught by PhD student Laura Jean Torgerson with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Uriah Kim.

NT GREEK II: AN INTRODUCTION (BS-1021)

Credits:3

The second part of a two-semester course introducing the skills required to read and interpret NT texts in Greek. Basic and intermediate grammar and vocabulary are the focus. Grades will be based on weekly assignments, quizes, and two exams. Course taught by PhD student Laura Jean Torgerson with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Uriah Kim.

ECCLESIASTICAL LATIN I (BS-1036)

Credits:3

This first half of a year's course aimed at preparing students to read (with a dictionary) Latin from Vulgate to recent Vatican documents. No prerequisites except rediness to come to class and study two/three hors in preparation. Daily recitation,occasional quizzes, midterm and final. Text: J.F. Collins, ^A Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin^ (CUA Press).

ECCLESIASTICAL LATIN II (BS-1037)

Credits:3

A continuation of Ecclesiastical Latin I. Same text, same requirements. My hope is to finish the Collins Text before the end of the term and have time for reading of real texts from Bible and Christian Latin authors such as Augustine and Aquinas.

BIBLICAL HEBREW (BS-1110)

Credits:3

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a working knowledge of Biblical (Classical) Hebrew; by the end of the course, the student will be able to read any passage of narrative in the Hebrew Bible with the aid of a lexicon (dictionary). The ability to reach this goal is dependent upon three primary areas of comprehension: 1) Knowledge of the Hebrew writing system (consonants and vowel points), 2) Knowledge of Hebrew grammar and basic syntax, and 3) Knowledge of Hebrew vocabulary

BASIC HEBREW I (BS-1120)

Credits:3

An introduction to the basic phonology and morphology of biblical Hebrew. This course or the equivalent is a prerequisite for Basic Hebrew II, the intensive course given in January Intersession.

BASIC HEBREW II (BS-1121)

Credits:3

The second (intensive) half of a course aimed at enabling students to achieve reading knowledge of biblical Hebrew. Class meets weekdays, 1/7/2019-2/1/2019, from 9:00am-1:00pm, at SFTS. [BS1120 or equivalent]

ELEMENTARY BIBLICAL HEBREW I (BS-1127)

Credits:3

This is the first half of a year-long course introducing the basic grammar of biblical Hebrew. The course focuses on the basics of phonology (sounds), morphology (forms), and syntax (word order and function) for biblical Hebrew. The primary purpose of this course is to establish a foundational understanding of biblical Hebrew for students pursuing further study of the language. Issues of exegesis and interpretation will be discussed where appropriate, but the main focus of this course will be learning the grammar of biblical Hebrew. [20 max enrollment] NOTE: This course is taught by GTU PhD student Eric Sias with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Uriah Kim.

ELEMENTARY BIBLICAL HEBREW II (BS-1128)

Credits:3

This is the second half of a year long course introducing the basic grammar of biblical Hebrew. The course focuses on the basics of phonology (sounds), morphology (forms), and syntax (word order and function) for biblical Hebrew. The primary purpose of this course is to establish a foundational understanding of biblical Hebrew for students pursuing further study of the language. Issues of exegesis and interpretation will be discussed where appropriate, but the main focus of this course will be learning the grammar of biblical Hebrew. [BS 1127 or equivalent; 20 max enrollment] NOTE: This course is taught by GTU PhD student Eric Sias with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Uriah Kim.

INTRO TO BIBLICAL GREEK (BS-1145)

Credits:1.5

This course designed to provide students with the basic linguistic tools to approach the Greek New Testament. This course focuses on vocabulary, grammar, and short translations. The emphasis is on becoming familiar with the basic grammatical structure of Koine Greek. [15 max enrollment]

RHETORICAL USE OF TEXTS (BS-1200)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Aaron Brody and Sharon Jacob. This course will introduce students to methodologies of interpretation of sacred texts. Focus will be placed on various texts of the Hebrew Bible and New Testament, but will include comparative texts from other sacred traditions (ancient Near Eastern, Mediterranean, and Hindu). Methods explored may include literary criticism, text criticism, and source criticism, material cultural approaches, arts and religion approaches, postcolonial, and critical race/ethnicity methods. Assignments will include several reflection papers. Assessment will be based on those papers and class participation and class presentations. This course is available for 1.5-3 units.

USING BIBLICAL LANGUAGES (BS-1250)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to the fundamental skills of biblical interpretation including basic Greek and Hebrew analysis of biblical texts, the use of key Hebrew and Greek grammatical and lexical aids in both print and electronic resources. Students will also be introduced to basic linguistic theory and a wide range of methods of biblical criticism. Required course for MDiv students. This course will be taught in Spring 2019 by PhD student Eric Sias with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of LeAnn Flesher.

INTERMEDIATE HEBREW II (BS-2003)

Credits:3

Students in the course will read selected texts in prose and some in poetry toward the end of semester. It will give some attention to the critical apparatus of BHS and some textual witnesses from other manuscripts. Attention given also to oral reading of the texts. Assessment by regular class participation and by two examinations. This course is designed for those students in any program in the GTU consortium with at minimum one year of Hebrew and will be especially relevant to those students in the MABL program and doctoral students in Biblical Studies.

INTERMEDIATE HEBREW (BS-2007)

Credits:3

The goals of this course are: to review the grammar (morphology and syntax) learned in first year; to increase vocabulary knowledge; to introduce students to prose readings from the Hebrew Bible (especially from narrative texts). Prerequisites: 2 semesters of elementary Hebrew

INTERMEDIATE GREEK I (BS-2008)

Credits:3

This course is designed to develop proficiency in reading and translating New Testament Greek. For that purpose, it includes a revision of some elements of verb morphology, verbal aspect (tenses) and grammar. It nevertheless mostly consists in translating and analyzing sections of Luke, Acts and some letters from the Pauline corpus, paying special attention to syntax. The course also introduces the student to the usage of the critical apparatus of NA28. [Two semesters of Greek or equivalent; 20 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

EXEGESIS WORKSHOP: GREEK (BS-2245)

Credits:1

This course is designed to apply the basic linguistic tools learned in Biblical Greek to the task of interpreting the biblical text in the context of preaching. This course focuses on the text selected in Biblical Preaching. The emphasis is on understanding the nuances of approaching the text in its original language with the purpose of making it available to a worshipping audience. Prerequisite: BS-1145 Introduction to Biblical Greek. Concurrent: HM-2245 Biblical Preaching. [30 max enrollment]

MARGINS, SPEAK (BS-3900)

Credits:3

This course is a seminar on global hermeneutics and the Bible. We will concentrate on the study and critique of particular interpretations of the New Testament coming from marginalized communities that have at one time or another felt disenfranchised, powerless, and voiceless. Such communities take it upon themselves to resist the dominant interpretations and in doing so they begin to create a space in which their voices can be heard and empowered. Special attention will be given to critical approaches, issues of identity, colonialism and resistance, and the ideological spectrum between the margins and the center. In so doing, this course serves the stated program goal of helping students attend to “the continuing importance and practice of interpretation of texts and their communities in history and culture.” During the semester, we will read and study biblical texts using different perspectives within a postmodern ideological framework. Under this postmodern lens, all interpretations of the biblical text -- whether historical, theological, literary or of any other kind; and whether presented by the instructor or the students -- are partial and non-universal readings. All real readers, flesh-and-blood readers like us, read subjectively and partially.

ADVANCED GREEK (BS-4014)

Credits:3

THE SYMPOSIUM: This course will read selected portions of Plato's Symposium, which is one of the best known prose texts in Attic Greek. The class will translate the text and discuss its grammatical features focusing on the syntax of each sentence and morphology of the vocabulary. Pertinent philosophical ideas of Plato will also be discussed as they shed light on the linguistic features of the given text.

DEAD SEA SCROLLS & SCRIPTURES (BS-4430)

Credits:3

Survey of the Dead Sea Scrolls (DSS), their discovery, archaeology and publication. Contents will include: sectarian writings, pseudepigrapha, apocrypha and biblical texts found in the Qumran `library'. Special focus on Jewish interpretations of Scriptures and their significance for understanding Judaism of the Second Temple / New Testament eras. Lecture / seminar format; student presentations/ book review/ research paper; intended for Advanced Students (M.A., S.T.L., PhD, ThD, STD); texts read in English (special sessions for students who read Hebrew). [Courses in OT and NT; Faculty Consent required; 15 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

QUMRAN LITERATURE (BS-5000)

Credits:3

Students in this advanced seminar will study a selection of the written remains of Qumran, reading selections from them in Hebrew. By end of course participants will demonstrate: a broad acquaintance with written Qumran texts; knowledge of their relevance for understanding biblical texts; facility in reading Hebrew (or Aramaic) textual remains, grasping the significance of their publication information, dealing with lacunae, preparing an adequate translation and commentary on a chosen text; ability to produce a critical study of a scroll text / or a topic within the wider field of Qumran studies. [Advanced status in biblical studies; Hebrew reading at upper intermediate level; Faculty Consent required; Auditors with faculty permission]

TEXTS AND METHODS (BS-6005)

Credits:3

Older and newer methods of analyzing and interpreting the Hebrew Bible will be examined. The book of Judges, the text and academic analyses and research on the book, will serve as basis for understanding and discussion of these approaches. Course meets in GTU Dean's Office in Flora Lamson Hewlett Library. [Faculty Consent required; 10 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

BALDWIN, BIBLE & SOCIAL JUSTC (BS-8260)

Credits:3

James Baldwin's biblical canon in ^Go Tell It on the Mountain^ and ^The Fire Next Time^ will be explored to identify his use of OT/NT texts to carve out a unique expression of social justice. Baldwin's texts, including texts to be selected by students, will help each participant to develop their own Baldwinian applied justice portfolio.

SACRED TEXTS SEMINAR (BSHR-6100)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Rebecca Esterson and Rita Sherma. What makes a text sacred? How does a community form a “canon” from original narratives? This course will explore the diverse ways in which sacred are read, understood, interpreted, embodied, and experienced. We will undertake a journey of discovery of the many ways in which sacred texts serve lived religion in the following traditions: Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism [alphabetical order]. After a study of their historical development ecumenically and interreligiously, we will consider their function within the tradition (theological, contemplative, liturgical, ritual, pastoral, spiritual formation, ethical, artistic, performative, etc.) and the hermeneutical principles that guide their interpretation.

HISTORY OF BIBLICAL INTERPRET (BSHS-4050)

Credits:3

While much of the academic study of the Bible since the rise of historical criticism has tended to focus on the cultural, religious, linguistic, and political setting of the text's authors and redactors, a complementary approach explores how the Bible has been interpreted in the generations since its authorship. Often phrased "reception history" the study of the history of biblical interpretation considers the life of biblical texts post-antiquity. The class will begin with a consideration of "inner-biblical exegesis" or the way in which later parts of the Bible reinterpret or allude to earlier parts. Taking our cue from the Bible itself, we will consider interpretation a fundamentally biblical activity, and will engage commentaries, art, poetry, and homilies spanning the millennia and across religious traditions. We will sample a range of methods and interpretations, from Classical rabbinic and early Christian Typological interpretations, to postmodern feminist and ecocritical commentaries. Other readings will include selections from the Qur'an, Rashi, the Zohar, Thomas Aquinas and William Blake.

ADVANCED SANSKRIT (BSPT-5000)

Credits:3

SCRIPTURAL STUDY AND TRANSLATION: This is an advanced Sanskrit language course with an emphasis on improving reading and translation skills. While we will go over some grammar rules, the focus of the course will be to familiarize oneself with a variety of Sanskrit language texts in the Hindu tradition—primary scriptural texts such as the Upanishads; secondary scriptural texts, such as the Panchadashi and Bhagavad Gita; commentaries such as that of Adi Shankara and Anandagiri; and literary works of Kalidasa and Bhasa. Students are expected to be familiar with the devanagari script and the foundational grammar rules of the Sanskrit language. [Auditors with faculty permission]

RACE/ETHNICITY IN THE BIBLICAL WORLD (BSRS-4040)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Aaron Brody and Sharon Jacob. This course will explore the representations of race/ethnicity in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, New Testament, and the ancient cultures that influenced and produced the texts. Since this is a relatively new field of study in the ancient world, students will be doing original research and working together to develop paradigms for understanding the concepts in the Bible as understood through critical race and ethnicity theories. Grades will be based on active class participation in this seminar course, oral presentation(s), and a research paper.

XN ETHICS: RAD LOVE EMBODIED (CE-1125)

Credits:3

This course introduces the practice and theory of moral formation, discernment, and conduct through the lens of Christian Ethics. Ethics is viewed as the art-science bringing Christian traditions and critical theory to the tasks of: 1) discerning what is right for any given situation, 2) finding moral-spiritual power to act on that discernment, and 3) discovering what forms individuals and society toward the good and what mal-forms away from it. The course includes some emphasis on Anglican and Lutheran perspectives, and holds social transformation toward justice and ecological well-being as an inherent aim of Christian ethics. This course is jointly offered by CDSP & PLTS. [30 max enrollment]

ROMAN CATHOLIC SEXUAL ETHICS (CE-2003)

Credits:3

This seminar course will examine human sexuality from the perspective of the Roman Catholic tradition as experienced in various cultural contexts and in dialogue with other religious traditions. The investigation includes an examination of the Church teachings and studies by leading theologians that explore topics such as marriage, family life, single life, and celibacy. The interreligious component seeks to foster a dialogue between the Roman Catholic Church and other faith communities concerning the core topics of the course. Method of evaluation consists of two 8-10 page papers (mid-term and final), weekly moodle posts, and group presentations. The course is intended for MA/MTS, MDiv students. PHD and DMin students are welcome but must register for a course upgrade and complete a 20 pages research paper for their final paper. [Faculty Consent required; 15 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

MORALITY & ETHICS (CE-2013)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by LeAnn Flesher and Michael Mathews. This course is part of the 5 course Public Theology program. The class will be geared toward assisting the student in establishing a systematic personal ethical method from which one does their work--training clergy and community leaders to bring their spiritual perspective to the most pressing social issues of our time--and assisting them in creating ways to have their voices be heard. Class meets daily, 1/14/2019-1/18/2019, from 9:00am to 5:00pm at ABSW.

FAMILY ETHICS (CE-2016)

Credits:3

The course will engage Christian thinking on sex, gender, marriage, family, and children. By taking family as its primary frame, the course carves out a space at the intersection of sexual ethics and social ethics. Questions include: Why do Christians care about family? What is sex for? What is gender and does it matter? What does justice have to do with marriage? Readings: Catholic and Protestant theologians, social scientists, critical theorists. Format: reading, discussion, and lecture. Student evaluation will be based on weekly reading responses, discussion, a take-home exam, and a final paper. Students should have taken one prior course in ethics.

FUNDAMENTAL MORAL THEOLOGY (CE-2045)

Credits:3

This course (designed for the MA/MDiv/MTS levels) will consider the fundamental principles of moral theology (the teleological drive for happiness and perfection, the moral virtues, freedom and voluntariness, natural law, prudence, the determinants of the moral act, moral "objectivity" and intentionality) from the perspective of the Roman Catholic tradition, particularly in the lineage of Aquinas. We will also examine in some detail the contemporary debate over the nature and importance of the "indirectly voluntary.” Students should be prepared to engage in disciplined and critical reading and thinking in the Aristotelian/Thomist tradition, and be willing and able to synthesize a large amount of sometimes complex and difficult material; this is not an easy course. The format is lecture, with opportunity for questions and discussion; students will be required to write a book review and take an in-class final examination. Class attendance is required.

FUNDAMENTAL MORAL THEOLOGY (CE-2056)

Credits:3

This course explores fundamental concepts of Roman Catholic moral theology, including: moral anthropology; the use of Scripture in morals; the nature and function of moral norms; conscience and its formation; natural law; fundamental option and sin; virtue and the telos of human life, and modes of moral reasoning. Moral theology is fundamentally a discipline of practical reasoning: these concepts will be addressed in the context of concrete cases and issues as well as at the abstract and theoretical level. Format is lecture/discussion, and student evaluation will be based on 3 essay examinations, with the option of writing a research paper in place of second two exams. This course meets the requirements of an Introductory course in the JST MDiv curriculum.

CATHOLIC SOCIAL TEACHING (CE-3050)

Credits:3

This is a seminar course focused on the Roman Catholic social teaching as expressed in the encyclical tradition from Leo XIII to Pope Francis and the Regional Bishops’ Conferences of the Catholic Church. The study will examine the development of Catholic social thought as it emerges from the reading of the “signs of the times” in light of sacred scripture, natural law, and virtue. Method of evaluation consists of two 8-10 page papers (mid-term and final), weekly Moodle posts, group presentations, and monthly news analysis. The course is intended for MA/MTS, MDiv students. PHD and DMin students are welcome but must register for a course upgrade and complete a 20 pages research paper for their final paper. [Faculty Consent required; 15 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

CHRISTIAN SOCIAL ETHICS (CE-3230)

Credits:3

ETHICS & SPIRITLTY OF MNSTRY (CE-3615)

Credits:3

What makes a good minister? What makes a bad minister? Who do you hope to become in the course of your ministry? What sustains and enlivens pastoral ministry? What particular issues and concerns are of significance in the practice of ministry? In this course, we will bring into dialogue aspects of the ethics and spirituality of ministry in various contexts: parishes, schools, prisons, etc. The aim is to develop an account of some of the virtues relevant to pastoral ministry. This account should both reflect the best aspects of the ministers who have been formative for us, and serve as a guide in our own future practice of ministry. I assume that all students bring to this class some experience in volunteer or professional ministry. While it is not a requirement of this class that students be engaged in practical ministry during this term, I strongly encourage you to do so. The course is organized according to four salient virtues for ministry: self-care, justice, fidelity and trustworthiness, and is most suitable for M.Div. and ministry-related MA students. This class is taught as a seminar. Grading will be based on weekly reflection papers, discussion facilitation, class participation, and a final paper or project. [One prior graduate level introductory moral theology or ethics class is required; Faculty Consent required; 15 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

VIOLENCE, JUSTICE AND MERCY (CE-4006)

Credits:3

This course will consider the difficult topics of war, incarceration, sexual violence, racism, torture, and migration using the framework of justice and mercy. In each case we will ask: What does justice require? What does mercy require? Can we make sense of suffering? Is forgiveness desirable or necessary? Is healing possible? Immersion component: a one week immersion trip over spring break to El Paso/Juarez is required. Format: reading/seminar-style discussion. Student evaluation will be based on weekly one-page reading reflection papers, discussion, and a final paper. Students should have taken one prior course in ethics. [Faculty Consent required; 12 max enrollment]

SEXUAL ETHICS (CE-4040)

Credits:3

Sexuality is sacred. This intensive course examines the role of sexual health for faith communities and their leaders. Students will engage key theological, ethical and public health perspectives on themes in sexual ethics, including: sexual freedom and responsibility, pleasure and desire, boundaries and consequences, heteropatriarchy and resistance, responding to violence and misconduct, abortion care, reproductive technologies, and prophetic witness for sexual justice. The course also provides students pursuing ministry and leadership within a tradition the opportunity to demonstrate their competency in professional clergy sexual ethics and promoting sexually healthy congregations. Particular emphasis is paid to queer and womanist/feminist voices on sexuality and faith. Evaluation is based on participation and discussion leadership, as well as case study analysis. It is open to both high- and low-residence students who have consistent access to technology requirements. Students should have taken the ECO Seminar, passed another course related to systemic oppression, or be willing to take a pre-course module. Relates to SKSM Threshold 5 and fulfills required course content for MFC Competency 2 [25 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

METHODS IN ETHICS (CE-5002)

Credits:3

Clear understanding of ethical method is a fundamental tool for teaching and research in ethics and moral theology. In ethics, methodology determines what "counts" as relevant information, the process by which that information is used, and the nature of an adequate response to a moral question. This seminar will explore the major methods used in Christian ethics and apply them to contemporary issues. Class format is lecture/discussion; weekly short papers and a final major paper on a topic of the student’s choice are required. This class is intended for GTU PhD students, JST-SCU STD and STL (comps option) students, and advanced master’s degree students in all programs. [Faculty Consent required]

INTRODUCTION TO BIOETHICS (CE-5008)

Credits:3

This seminar will provide an overview of bioethics. Starting with the dominant philosophical approach, the course will then look to Christian approaches to bioethics. The remainder of the course will be spent examining particular issues in bioethics, including stem cell research, cloning, organ transplantation, and genetic engineering. Students will be asked to present materials related to one of the issues, write a reflection paper on a second of the issues, and write a final paper constructing a position on an issue in bioethics. No prior experience in science or ethics needed.

INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIAN ETHICS (CE-8109)

Credits:3

CHRISTIAN ETHICS: RADICAL LOVE (CE-8125)

Credits:3

XN ETHICS: RAD LOVE EMBODIED. This online course introduces the practice and theory of moral formation, discernment, and conduct through the lens of Christian Ethics. Ethics is viewed as the art-science bringing Christian traditions and critical theory to the tasks of: 1) discerning what is right for any given situation, 2) finding moral-spiritual power to act on that discernment, and 3) discovering what forms individuals and society toward the good and what mal-forms away from it. The course includes some emphasis on Anglican and Lutheran perspectives, and holds social transformation toward justice and ecological well-being as an inherent aim of Christian ethics. This course is jointly offered by CDSP & PLTS. [20 max enrollment]

CONFESSIONAL MINISTRY (CEFT-2000)

Credits:1.5

The course offers a practicum on the Sacrament of Reconciliation, focusing on the theological, pastoral and canonical issues the confessor may encounter. The course is designed for Roman Catholic ordination candidates who have completed their M.Div. requirements in moral theology, canon law, sacramental theology, and pastoral counseling, and who are able to critically analyze moral action in light of the principles of Roman Catholic moral theology in the tradition of Aquinas. No written work, but attendance at each and every class and full participation is required of all. Local clergy will also participate in the sessions as role players. The course requires strong oral presentations skills.

PATRISTIC SALVATION & ETHICS (CEHS-4070)

Credits:3

This course will take an interdisciplinary approach (theology, ethics, history, and spirituality) to exploring the connections between ethics and salvation within the thought of the early Christian Church. The readings will focus more heavily on Eastern writers such as Sts. Basil, John Chrysostom, and Maximos the Confessor, but will also include key western authors such as St. Augustine. Seminar format with evaluation based on class participation, reflection papers, and a research paper.

ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS (CEHS-4200)

Credits:3

This course will introduce and explore the concept of environmental ethics. Beginning with biblical and early Christian witnesses, students will learn about ascetic and patristic references to the relationship between humans and the rest of creation. The course will also address recent questions and approaches to a Christian Environmental Ethic.

OUR WORK IN CONTEXT SEMINAR (CEPS-2100)

Credits:1.5

On-campus social justice seminar for MDiv-MASC students whose studies focus on spiritual direction and chaplaincy. This seminar will include deep self-examination and contextualizing of students' healing work/ministry using social-ecological and social-dominance theoretical frameworks. Students will discuss ways to engage in their individualized pastoral and spiritual studies while at the same time bringing an anti-oppression, culturally competent understanding of broader societal issues to their understanding. In-person seminars will be flexibly scheduled to dovetail with students' scheduled chaplaincy and spiritual direction studies. Reading will include chapters and articles offered throughout the semester. Periodic Zoom conversations will take place between the on-campus seminars. Brief integrative reflection papers will be required. This course is high-residency. Students must contact the instructor via e-email prior to enrolling in order to receive permission to register. Registration is contingent upon faculty approval. [8 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

ISSUES IN MINISTRY AND AGING (CEPS-3900)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Devorah Greenstein and Nancy Arvold. In this one week intensive course, we share our attention between focused pastoral care and broader societal aspects of aging. We examine aging-related issues both as individuals’ personal circumstances and as clear manifestations of the broader societal context in which individual situations and problems are situated. Issues include (and are not limited to) developmental theories, marginalizations/inequalities/microaggressions, role changes/identities, spiritual development, caregiver supports, end of life issues. Activities include lectures (guest and instructors), discussions, films, enactments/role plays, art/music activities. Brief daily journaling and final paper required. Prerequisite reading of one book and some articles. Suitable for students interested in chaplaincy, hospice work, pastoral care, as well as students interested in aging and broader sociological perspectives. Intermediate/advanced course intended for MDiv/MASC students, with doctoral upgrade possible. The course relates to Thresholds #2 and #5. MFC Competences #2 and #4. Students must contact the instructor via e-email prior to enrolling in order to receive permission to register. Registration is contingent upon faculty approval. Course meets daily, 1/7/2019-1/11/2019, from 9am-5pm at SKSM. [12 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

INTRO TO PASTORAL COUNSELING (CEPS-8411)

Credits:3

This online course introduces students to culturally responsive counseling practices and multicultural awareness. Students examine societal and institutional structures of power and privilege, and become more aware of biases, prejudices, and microaggressions detrimental to the growth of the human spirit. Students study major counseling theories and practice basic helping skills centered on Person-Centered (Rogerian) counseling and Bowen Family Systems Theory. Pastoral elements will include individual, family, and congregational contexts. Asynchronous course with written lectures, videos, and links to online resources. Weekly personal reflections and skill-practice exercises, with some academic writing. Possible synchronous skills-practice opportunities. Intermediate/advanced course intended for MDiv students, and with doctoral upgrade possible. It relates to Thresholds #2 and #5. MFC Competences #2 and #4. Students must contact the instructor via e-email prior to enrolling in order to receive permission to register. Registration is contingent upon faculty approval. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment]

AGRARIAN THEOLOGIES PART 1 (CERS-1501)

Credits:1.5

COUNTER-OPPRESSIVE AGRARIAN THEOLOGIES - INTRODUCTORY INTENSIVE How does a perspective of the divine grounded in the soul, in the humus that makes us human, shape our relationship to each other, to the planet, and to God? This experiential and embodied course will help religious leaders gain first-hand experience in the spiritual and structural nuances of our food systems and in how our lives and ministries fit within them. We will explore how systems of oppression intersect with our own bodies through how we produce and interact with the food we eat, and create space for creative imagining and exploration of solutions to food systems problems. This intensive, in-person class will provide a foundation and common language for students to bring with them into Part 2 of this course, which will be conducted online and which will require weekly volunteering at a local farm or garden in the student's community (the instructor can help make connections for this). Students are required to enroll in both parts. The course is intended for all students. This course may help meet the Starr King thresholds for Prophetic Witness and Work, Spiritual Practice and Care for the Soul, Educating for Wholeness and Liberation, and Embodied Wisdom and Beauty. It may also help meet the MFC competencies of Spiritual Development for Self and Others, Social Justice in the Public Square, and Leads the Faith into the Future. Course meets daily, 1/14/19-1/19/19, from 9am-1pm at SKSM.

CLIMATE JUSTICE; THEO & ACTIO (CERS-4450)

Credits:3

This intensive seminar course will use methodologies of Christian ethics and interaction with local climate justice activists to examine: 1) the climate crisis as a moral matter in relationship to various forms of structural injustice including injustice grounded in race/ethnicity, class, and colonialism, and 2) pathways for addressing the climate crisis with hope. Special attention will be given to global–local connections and perspectives from marginalized communities. Methodological resources include liberation ethics, Earth ethics, post-colonial perspectives, eco-feminist perspectives, and eco-hermeneutics. The course involves reading, writing, engagement with community groups, collaborative knowledge building, and discussion. The informing undercurrent of the course is the quest for hope and moral-spiritual agency in the face of seemingly insurmountable obstacles. [30 max enrollment]

TECHNOLOGY & HUMAN PRESENCE (CERS-4875)

Credits:3

New technologies are broadly reshaping human relationships—the ways in which people are or are not present with each other. In this seminar, we will engage resources available across the academic study of religion and theology to examine, critique, and productively address these impacts. In doing so, we will explore the important roles that religion scholars and theologians might play both in shaping public understandings of technologies’ impacts on presence and in shaping the technologies themselves. The seminar is part of Public Theologies of Technology and Presence, a three-year program and research initiative funded by the Henry Luce Foundation. The seminar affords students the opportunity to take up the program’s questions and work. The approach to the seminar is multidisciplinary and interreligious. Students are welcome from all academic disciplines, specializations, and religious traditions. Method of Evaluation: class participation, reflection papers, final paper. Suitable for graduate students pursuing any advanced degrees. There are no prerequisites. Course is repeatable for credit. [15 max enrollment]

AGRARIAN THEOLOGIES PART 2 (CERS-8102)

Credits:1.5

COUNTER-OPPRESSIVE AGRARIAN THEOLOGIES - LOCAL LAND-BASED LEARNING How does a perspective of the divine grounded in the soul, in the humus that makes us human, shape our relationship to each other, to the planet, and to God? This online yet experiential and embodied course will help religious leaders gain first-hand experience in the spiritual and structural nuances of our food systems and in how our lives and ministries fit within them. We will explore how systems of oppression intersect with our own bodies through how we produce and interact with the food we eat, and create space for creative imagining and exploration of solutions to food systems problems. This course builds upon the foundation laid in the required Agrarian Theologies Part 1 intensive. Students will spend time each week volunteering at a local garden or farm (instructor can offer assistance with placements), using that experience as a primary text to bring into dialogue with selected readings. Students will be evaluated based on their engaged reflections and online dialogue with each other, in addition to a final paper or project. The course is intended for all students. This course may help meet the Starr King thresholds for Prophetic Witness and Work, Spiritual Practice and Care for the Soul, Educating for Wholeness and Liberation, and Embodied Wisdom and Beauty. It may also help meet the MFC competencies of Spiritual Development for Self and Others, Social Justice in the Public Square, and Leads the Faith into the Future.

BODY & SOUL/CUERPO Y ALMA (CEST-2300)

Credits:3

"Decolonizing Latinx and Liberation Theologies." This course will explore Latin American Liberation Theologies and embodied ritual practices that interrogate the body as a space of contention, resistance, and transformation. Requirements: Weekly attendance and participation; Three individual five (5) page reflection papers; One collective class presentation; One final individual paper/project. Examples of topics to be discussed: 1) Indigenous Ways of Knowing: The Lived Religious Experience. 2) Two-Spirits/Queer/GNC Latinx Bodies as Decolonizing Narratives of Resistance. 3) Fleshing the Spirit: Storytelling and Healing Rituals as Research and Theological Narratives. Relates to SKSM Thresholds: 4, 5, 6, 8. Relates to MFC Comps: 1, 3, 4, 6, 7. [32 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

MORAL INJURY (CEST-5000)

Credits:3

The concept of moral injury strives to address the deep spiritual wounds experienced by many - as perpetrators, victims, or witnesses - in the context of war, violence and injustice. In this advanced interdisciplinary seminar, we will critically engage different definitions of moral injury related to the spiritual wounds of war and military occupation, and explore the uses and the redefinitions of moral injury in relation to other issues involving systemic violence and oppression (e.g., sexual assault, genocide, racism, transphobia, economic injustice, climate change, mass migrations, Islamophobia – addressed intersectionally). The course will explore the articulation of the concept of moral injury in different spiritual and theological traditions, and challenge the role of theologies, spirituality and the arts in proposing individual and collective processes of healing, transformation and justice-making. Introductory paper, two reflection essays, one course presentation and a final paper. Doctoral students; advanced MA, M.Div. and MASC students need to contact the instructor via email and obtain permission before enrolling. Prerequisites: ECO and Multi-religious Core Intensives, or similar courses, preferred. Relates to SKSM Thresholds # 2,5 and 6 and to MFC competencies 2, 3 and 5. [15 max enrollment]

ECO-THEOLOGIES (CEST-8450)

Credits:3

As theologians rooted in Judeo-Christian religious traditions have responded to the complex nexus of the injustices of ecological crises and social inequities, a variety of critical and constructive theologies have emerged. This course explores how ecotheologies, including ecofeminist, ecowomanist, queer ecotheologies, and Native American theologies of creation, have engaged the major issues in ecotheology, and in what ways these theologies address contemporary environmental/ecological issues. Each student will research one current ecological issue as a conversation partner for the theologies we will study. We will also be asking questions about the implications of these theological projects for liturgical practices, congregational mission, and the students' own constructive theological work where applicable. Weekly reading and regular online participation in Moodle's discussion board, weekly group work via synchronistic online tools, two synthesis papers, and a final project are required. Prior coursework in theology helpful but not required. Intended for M.Div., MASC, MA, and certificate students. The course relates to SKSM's Thresholds 1, 2, 6 and MFC Compentencies 3, 4, 7. The online course is asyncrhonous with synchronous small group work. [15 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

CSR FINAL PROJECT (CSR-3001)

Credits:3

The final component of the CSR program, the CSR Final Project is designed by the student with the approval of their CSR advisor/coordinator. Students sign up for CSR 3001 when the semester they are completing this project. The general topic of the project is established when you enter the CSR program and is used to direct your course of study throughout the program. The project should include both research and community application components. Students are recommended to consult with at least two CSR-related faculty (either regular or adjunct) concerning their final projects. [Faculty Consent required]

MORALITY & ETHICS (DM-5013)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by LeAnn Flesher and Michael Mathews. This course is part of the 5 course Public Theology program. The class will be geared toward assisting the student in establishing a systematic personal ethical method from which one does their work--training clergy and community leaders to bring their spiritual perspective to the most pressing social issues of our time--and assisting them in creating ways to have their voices be heard. Class meets daily, 1/14/2019-1/18/2019, from 9:00am to 5:00pm at ABSW.

PUBLIC THEOLOGY INTERNSHIP (DM-5400)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by LeAnn Flesher and Michael Mathews. This is the fifth of five courses in the Public Theology Certificate Program. In this course students will participate in a semester long internship in which they will work with a carefully selected mentor that has expertise in the student’s area of interest. Class Meeting Dates: (fall 2018): September 7--BBQ w/ mentors and cohort #2 (6:00 pm); October 12--Cohort #1 meets to share mentorship experiences (7:00 to 9:00 pm); December 7--Final meeting & celebration; Cohort #1 creates public presentation of project--the wider community invited (there will be food)--6:00-8:00 pm.

PUBLIC THEOLOGY (DM-5420)

Credits:3

UNDER SUPERVISION (DM-6005)

Credits:0

PSR DMin students use this course number for registering during terms when they are not registering for coursework. This course indicates continuation in the program and carries a fee per semester. (This number is also used during a term while the student is engaged in coursework away from PSR.) Pass/Fail only.

DMIN SUPERVISION (DM-6010)

Credits:6

DMin Supervision 1 applies to students at the proposal writing stage of their D/P. This course is designed for students enrolled in the DMin program at SFTS. It is not available for GTU cross-registration. Eligible students may apply directly to SFTS, Advanced Pastoral Studies. For more information, please go to: http://sfts.edu/academics/doctor-of-ministry/. Pass/Fail only. [Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded]

D.MIN. IN THESIS (DM-6011)

Credits:6

PSR DMin Students who have completed their Request to Proceed with Project process should register for this class until they finish and defend their work if they have already completed their 6 units of DMIN in Thesis. Course may be taken for 3-6 units.

D.MIN. SUPERVISION II (DM-6013)

Credits:6

Dmin Supervision 2 applies to students at the D/P stage. This course is designed for students enrolled in the DMin program at SFTS. It is not available for GTU cross-registration. Eligible students may apply directly to SFTS, Advanced Pastoral Studies. For more information, please go to: http://sfts.edu/academics/doctor-of-ministry/ . Pass/Fail only. [Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded]

DMIN ANNUAL CONTiNUING SEMINAR (DM-6021)

Credits:1.5

This seminar is required for PSR DMin students each year after the DM-5000 & DM-5001 series or DM-6012 are completed. This seminar is designed to maintain peer conversation and development of student projects regularly for every year the student is active in the program. Students will have an opportunity to present on the progress of their project during this seminar to each other among different cohorts. Before the seminar meets each Intersession, each student is required to submit a written Progress Report to the faculty person leading the seminar. DMin students should register for 1.5 credits the first two years this course is taken and 0.0 units for all subsequent years. Class meets daily, 1/7/2019-1/11/2019, from 9:00am to 1:00pm at PSR 5. [Auditors excluded]

DMIN SUPPLEMENTAL STUDIES (DM-6022)

Credits:6

This course is undertaken by DMin students seeking to supplement required coursework with studies in the classroom or "out in the field" which enhance their readiness for Dissertation/Project stage work through expansion of their ministry experience base, research knowledge, and/or practice of ministry skills. This course is available for 0-6 units. [Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded]

CRITICAL INTERP & PROJ DEV I (DM-6031)

Credits:3

Critical Interpretation and Project Development I is a seminar style methods course intended to prepare and assist the DMin student for and in the preparation of his/her final dissertation project. This course will include refresher sessions on biblical exegesis, hermeneutics, systematic theology, constructive theology and contextual theology and introduce the student to the dissertation proposal. Throughout this seminar the student will develop the first draft of the first part of his/her project proposal including: the problem statement, project background, projected outcomes, contribution to transformational leadership, context of ministry, biblical & theological basis, methods of research, and proposed outline. The remainder of the project components will be developed in part II of this two part methods seminar. Class meets daily, 1/22/2019-1/26/2019, from 9:00am to 5:00pm at ABSW.

WOMANIST / FEMINIST BIBLICAL INTERPRETATION (DM-6049)

Credits:3

This Womanist-Feminist Biblical Interpretation course will use intersecting disciplines of ethical theory and literature as tools to construct various approaches to womanist and feminist biblical hermeneutics. As such, the class will require students to develop paradigms for understanding concepts of race, ethnicity, and gender as competing and intersecting realities both within the Bible and in its use and misuse in reader reception throughout history. This is a hybrid course with an online component that extends beyond the last day in the classroom. Class meets daily, 1/14/2019-1/18/2019, from 2:00p to 5:00pm at SFTS.

THEOLOGICAL REFLECTION OF CLINICAL ISSUES IN SCG (DMPS-6049)

Credits:3

This Theological Reflection of Clinical Issues in Spiritual Care Giving course will assist spiritual caregivers and religious counselors to think theologically about key psychological issues, diagnoses and dynamics and to use that theological understanding to enrich and inform their psychological, social and cultural understanding of people and families. We will consider many of the more common psychological dynamics, like depression, anxiety/fear, addictions, sickness, loss and trauma and relational dynamics. This course will summarize the current psychological understanding of these issues, and then explore various theological perspectives on the same issues. By so doing, the course will help students clarify the unique nature of a spiritual perspective. The course will then help students develop a uniquely spiritual assessment instrument, which could be a helpful diagnostic tool for spiritual caregivers. Class meets weekdays, 1/7/2019-1/18/2019, from 9:00am to 12:00pm at SFTS.

SELF, OTHER & COMMUNITY (DMRS-6051)

Credits:3

Educational philosopher, Maxine Greene, speaks of the “incomplete self” to challenge modernity’s notion of the autonomous self. The incomplete self exists within ongoing experience and within a vital matrix of interrelatedness with the world. Challenging individual introspection with a communal vision of transformation, the course contends for the inextricable link between self and social consciousness and considers how the “incomplete” self transforms through mutuality with others and practice of compassion. A generative focus of the seminar will be the necessary work by the church to articulate theologies of community and to live into—thereby, teach—ministries of reconciliation. Class meets daily, 1/14/2019-1/18/2019, from 9:00am to 5:00pm at SFTS.

CONTEMPLATIVE LISTENING (DMSP-6502)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to a variety of listening techniques and skills. We will work in small groups, dyads, and individually to deepen the ability to listen attentively and non-judgmentally to others (people, music, nature, inner experience). ENROLLMENT IN THIS COURSE IS LIMITED TO STUDENTS IN THE APS PROGRAM AT SFTS. Course meets daily, 1/7/19-1/11/19, from 9am-5pm at SFTS. [4 max enrollment]

PREPARATION FOR COMPREHENSIVES (DR-6001)

Credits:3

For PhD and ThD students only. Course available for 0.5-12 units.

PREPARATION FOR COMPREHENSIVES (DR-6001)

Credits:12

For PhD and ThD students only. Course available for 0.5-12 units.

PREPARATION FOR DISSERTATION (DR-6002)

Credits:12

For PhD and ThD students only. Course available for 0.5-12 units.

RETREAT PLANNING: THEOLOGY AND PRACTICE (ED-1050)

Credits:1

This workshop offers students the opportunity to plan retreats appropriate for audiences in different pastoral settings. It will involve exploring themes, organizing talks, designing activities, and discussing best practices. The course allows students to integrate different areas of their theological studies as applied to the praxis of retreat-giving. Class meets Saturdays, 1/26/19-2/2/19, from 8:30am-5:00pm.

POSTMODERN CHRISTIAN EDUCATION (ED-1225)

Credits:3

This foundational course in Christian Education attends to the plural cultures of the postmodern world, which form the present context within which Christian faith must be formed and nurtured. Using approaches that integrate theory, practice, and critical reflection within the course’s pedagogy, students will be enabled to foster the same capacities for critically-reflective and committed Christian praxis in persons of all ages, within particular contexts for ministry. Classes include lecture, discussion, small group work, and interactive learning exercises. Evaluation of class participation, two reflection papers, a reflective observation or teaching assignment, and a major paper. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment]

CHRISTIAN FAITH FORMATION: PEDAGOGIES & PRACTICES (ED-2225)

Credits:1.5

This course provides a practically minded orientation to Christian faith formation, paying close attention to a diversity of pedagogies and a variety of practices that can encourage growth in faith and Christian living for all ages. We concentrate upon: • significant contexts and theological themes for Christian education, • pedagogical theories and practical strategies for teaching, learning and fostering lifelong faith formation effectively, • mutually correlative relationships between faith formation in community and a daily life of discipleship. We consider questions like: Why does the church value faith formation as vital to its understanding of mission?" Who is faith formation "for,” primarily? What should the "contents" of a program of faith formation be? What can neuroscience teach us about faith formation? What challenges and insights are presented to pedagogies and practices of faith formation by differences in age, culture, and social location? What gets in the way of faith formation? What makes for an effective teaching/facilitating? How can participation in a program of faith formation impact the ways we understand discipleship – both our own and that of a Christian community? This course is offered as a seven-week intensive starting the week of February 4, 2019 and ending the week of March 18, 2019. Meets Thursdays 1:45-5:00pm. [30 max enrollment]

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION AND CRITICAL PEDAGOGY: A CHRISTIAN APPROACH (ED-3230)

Credits:3

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION AND CRITICAL PEDAGOGY: A CHRISTIAN APPROACH What is religious education? How have we done and how might we want to do in the future? The course introduces religious education from a perspective of critical pedagogy. Students will explore the six paradigms of religious education (tradition-centered, person-centered, justice-centered, family-centered, faith community-centered, and earth-centered educations) and examine them with critical theories, including race theory, postcolonialism, and feminism. The class will use the forms of lecture, student presentation, and small group discussion. Reading materials include, but are not limited to, the writings of Jack Seymour, Richard Osmer, Thomas Groome, and Mary Elizabeth Moore for RE, and Paulo Freire and bell hooks for critical pedagogy. This is a synchronous hybrid course, which means that students can join the class either in person or through Zoom. (It is expected that students choose either way and stick to it throughout the course.) [30 max enrollment]

ADULT RELIGIOUS EDUCATION (ED-4072)

Credits:3

Amidst growing consensus that people joining progressive churches seek personal growth and spiritual deepening, most Unitarian universalist congregations do not provide adequate programs to meet this need. This course provides students with an overview of the theory and practice of adult and multigenerational religious education in the progressive church. The second half of the course will be conducted as a seminar with students researching existing adult and multigenerational faith development/religious education/spiritual deepening programs and making constructive proposals for best practices in congregations. Participants will be evaluated on weekly participation and a final project. The course is suited to MDiv, MA/MTS, DMin, and certificate students. While the course touches on all of the SKSM thresholds, it is most related to #7, 5, 4, and 2. It also addresses MFC competencies #3, 4, and 7. This is a residential course accepting students participating through distance technologies. [12 max enrollment]

INTERRELIGIOUS LEARNING & EDU (ED-4700)

Credits:3

INTER-RELIGIOUS LEARNING AND EDUCATION Increasing religious conflict and violence based on ignorance and indifference call for inter-religious learning as a necessary and alternative religious practice today. This course surveys histories, theories, and practices of inter-religious learning and education. The course also explores issues and problems related to inter-religious engagement in particular religious, cultural, and historical contexts, and deals with subject matters, such as pluralism, identity, religion, and postmodern philosophies. Students participate in conversations with their own religious and cultural backgrounds, and find ways to apply inter-religious education to their own contexts as they conduct either a research project with their working theories or a practice project which presents a thorough plan for an inter-religious curriculum, ministry, or any other activity. [20 max enrollment]

POSTMODERN CHRISTIAN EDUCATION (ED-8110)

Credits:3

This foundational course in Christian Education (the online version of ED 1225) attends to the plural cultures of the postmodern world, which form the present context within which Christian faith must be formed and nurtured. Using approaches that integrate theory, practice, and critical reflection within the course’s pedagogy, students will be enabled to foster the same capacities for critically-reflective and committed Christian praxis in persons of all ages, within particular contexts for ministry. Each week's online work will include lecture, discussion, small group work, and interactive learning exercises. Evaluation of class participation, two reflection papers, a reflective observation or teaching assignment, and a major paper. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment]

SPECIAL FIELD STUDY MINISTRY I (FE-1003)

Credits:3

Specialized field study arranged in consultation and with approval of the Field Education faculty. No course prerequisites. Pass/Fail only. To enroll, students must have made arrangements for an approved field education placement with the Director of Field Education. This course is available for 1.5-3 units. [Faculty Consent Required; Auditors excluded]

SPECIAL FIELD STUDY MNSTRY II (FE-1004)

Credits:3

Specialized field study arranged in consultation and with approval of the Field Education faculty. No course prerequisites. Pass/Fail only. To enroll, students must have made arrangements for an approved field education placement with the Director of Field Education. This course is available for 1.5-3 units. [Faculty Consent required]

CONCURRENT FIELD STUDY I (FE-1005)

Credits:3

3 hour per week on-campus class and 15 hours per week on-site basic field education. 2-semester long course. Completion of Fall & Spring semesters meets M. Div. program Basic Field Education requirement. Open to MTS students. Pass/Fail only. To enroll, student must have made arrangements for an approved field education placement with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Section 01 meets on Wednesday, 9:10AM - 12:00PM. in Holbrook 133 & 134. First class session is Wednesday, Sept 05, 2018. Section 02 meets on Monday evening, 6:10-9:00PM, Holbrook 134. First class session Monday Sept 10, 2018 No faculty approval needed for Section 01. Faculty permission required to enroll in Section 02. Faculty for Section 02 is Christy Newton/Sandra Blair ALL STUDENTS FROM BOTH SECTIONS ARE REQUIRED TO ATTEND COURSE ORIENTATION ON FIRST WEDNESDAY A.M. CLASS MEETING, SEPT . 5, 2018 [Faculty Consent required to enroll in Section 02; Auditors excluded from both sessions]

INTERNSHIP I (FE-1011)

Credits:3

Full-time on-site field education. Arranged in consultation and with approval of Field Education faculty. Pass/Fail only. Internship to meet M.Div. program Field Ed requirement can begin in Fall, Spring, or Summer as long as it occurs over 9 consecutive months. To enroll, students must have made arrangements for an approved field education placement with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Full-time internship students can only take one other course per semester. [Faculty permission required; Auditors excluded]

INTERNSHIP III (FE-1013)

Credits:3

Full-time on-site field education. Arranged in consultation and with approval of Field Education faculty. Pass/Fail only. Internship to meet MDiv. program Field Ed requirement can begin in Fall, Spring, or Summer as long as it occurs over 9 consecutive months. To enroll, students must have made arrangements for an approved field education placement with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Full-time internship students can only take one other course per semester. [Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded]

Summer Internship (FE-1014)

Credits:3

FIELD EDUCATION LEVEL I, PART 1 (FE-1021)

Credits:0

This course introduces students to the fundamental skills required for supervised ministry. Students will learn processes of theological reflection for ministry and mission. They will develop their understanding of the vocation & mission of the ordained & laity in the Church and world, in light of Catholic teaching. They will also learn fundamental concepts and skills related to evangelization and collaborative ministry. Format: lecture & discussion (and a supervised ministry placement). Basis for Assessment: participation, written theological reflections, and completion of a Learning Contract. Course is normally taken Pass/Fail. This course is a prerequisite for Field Ed Level I, Part 2; the student will earn a total of 1.5 units of credit for Field Ed Level I, Parts 1 & 2 after passing both courses. Intended audience: DSPT MDiv students. Course meets at St. Albert Priory, 5890 Birch Court, Oakland.

MDIV INTEGRATION SEMINAR I (FE-1152)

Credits:1.5

The Integration Seminar is guided by one of three themes for each year of the M. Div. degree: ministerial identity, ministerial praxis or ministerial integration. In the first year of the M. Div. program the seminar focuses upon the theme of ministerial identity. To this end, the fall semester seminar will explore the themes of vocational and ministerial calling, professional ministerial identity and collaborative leadership. The seminar also integrates aspects of Ignatian spirituality. The seminar provides the opportunity for students in the M. Div. seminar to support each other’s vocations, work together collaboratively, and build a cohort community. [JST 1st year M. Div. students.]

CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION (FE-2000)

Credits:12

Ministry to persons in pastoral care setting, participation in weekly individual and group reflection upon that ministry with supervisor, study of theoretical material from theology, the behavioral sciences, and pastoral care. Integrates theological understanding and knowledge of behavioral science into pastoral functioning. Taken at a CPE site approved by the ACPE (or other accrediting organization determined by Director of Community Engaged Learning as accepted by employers and/or denominations.) Program conducted under the supervision of an ACPE accredited supervisor. Student must submit CPE program acceptance letter in order to register. Supervisor reports progress to Field Education faculty as requested and submits final evaluation to be placed in the student's permanent file for grade. Student must complete one CPE unit in one semester or two consecutive semesters in order to receive 6 units of academic credit. Student can take CPE for 0 units of academic credit in order to have completion of CPE appear on their transcript. Course is available for 0-6 units. [Auditors excluded; faculty permission required] If CPE is taken to meet M. Div. program FE requirement, it can only be taken P/F and must be taken during consecutive Fall & Spring semesters. Otherwise, can be taken for letter grade or P/F.

CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION (FE-2000)

Credits:6

Ministry to persons in pastoral care setting, participation in weekly individual and group reflection upon that ministry with supervisor, study of theoretical material from theology, the behavioral sciences, and pastoral care. Integrates theological understanding and knowledge of behavioral science into pastoral functioning. Taken at a CPE site approved by the ACPE (or other accrediting organization determined by Director of Community Engaged Learning as accepted by employers and/or denominations.) Program conducted under the supervision of an ACPE accredited supervisor. Student must submit CPE program acceptance letter in order to register. Supervisor reports progress to Field Education faculty as requested and submits final evaluation to be placed in the student's permanent file for grade. Student must complete one CPE unit in one semester or two consecutive semesters in order to receive 6 units of academic credit. Student can take CPE for 0 units of academic credit in order to have completion of CPE appear on their transcript. Course is available for 0-6 units. [Auditors excluded; faculty permission required] If CPE is taken to meet M. Div. program FE requirement, it can only be taken P/F and must be taken during consecutive Fall & Spring semesters. Otherwise, can be taken for letter grade or P/F.

ADVANCED FIELD EDUCATION II (FE-2011)

Credits:3

Advanced work in Field Education. Pass/Fail only. Prerequisites: FE 1005 and FE 1006. To enroll, students must have made arrangements for an approved field education placement with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Students will meet as a learning cohort twice a month for 1.5-2.0 hours with Field Education faculty. Date and time for the semester will be set at the orientation session on Jnauary 30, 2019 at 1:30 p.m. [FE 1005, FE 1006; Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded]

PASTORAL MINISTRY INTERNSHIP (FE-2021)

Credits:1.5

FIELD EDUCATION LEVEL II, PART 1: FALL SEMESTER INTERNSHIP. This course is part of students' year-long experience in a supervised pastoral ministry experience, through which they will (a) exercise basic skills of the apostolate, (b) engage in theological reflection upon it, and (c) document and communicate their learning about these areas. Each student is required to arrange for regular supervisory sessions with the approved supervisor at the ministry site. Requirements: In consultation with the on-site supervisor, the student must submit (a) a learning contract, (b) theological reflections demonstrating an integration of theological learning with pastoral experience, (c) documentation on apostolic skills. Permission the Director of Field Education is required. Course is normally taken Pass/Fail. This course is a prerequisite for Field Ed Level II, Part 2. Intended audience: DSPT MDiv students. Prerequisite: Field Ed Level I, Parts 1 & 2.

FIELD EDUCATION PLACEMENT I (FE-2091)

Credits:3

Theological Field Education Placement I is the first in a two-course sequence, each of which includes the weekly reading, on-line class engagement, participation in peer reflection groups via WebEx for 1.5 hours every other week, and a minimum of eight to ten hours in concurrent placement in an approved congregation or alternative organization relevant to a student’s vocational intentions. Student assignments include a learning covenant, theological reflection papers, participation in peer theological reflection, and an analytic description of the placement site that is prepared as an on-line presentation. Students enrolling in this course must have completed FE2190. [Faculty Consent required]

MDIV INTEGRATION SEMINAR II (FE-2152)

Credits:3

This course consists of a two-semester supervised field practicum. JST M. Div. 2 students participate in the FE-2152 Integration Seminar, supervised ministerial/field education placements, and weekly facilitated theological reflection groups. [JST 2nd year M. Div. students.]

INTRO THEOLOGICAL FIELD ED I (FE-2180)

Credits:3

This is the first in a two-semester sequence, each of which includes the weekly expectation of two hours in class and eight to ten hours in concurrent placement in an approved congregation or alternative organization relevant to a student’s vocational intentions. Class time will be split into two sections: (1) lecture/discussion regarding frameworks and practices for leadership in congregations/organizations (2) theological reflection on experiences in placements sites. In addition to weekly reading, student assignments include a placement plan, a learning covenant, theological reflection papers, theological reflection in peer groups, and presentation of an analytical description of their placement site. [Faculty Consent required]

INTRO THEOLOGICAL FIELD ED II (FE-2181)

Credits:3

Introduction to Theological Field Education II is the second in a two-semester sequence, each of which includes the weekly expectation of two hours in class and eight to ten hours in concurrent placement in an approved congregation or alternative organization relevant to a student’s vocational intentions. Class time will be split into two sections: (1) lecture/discussion regarding frameworks and practices for leadership in congregations/organizations (2) theological reflection on experiences in placements sites. In addition to weekly reading, student assignments include a learning covenant, theological reflection papers, theological reflection in peer groups, and a congregational development project in their placement site which will also be presented to the class.. This class meet Wednesday morning from 9:30 - 11:30 AM.. [FE 2180; Faculty Consent required]

ADV CONCURRENT FIELD STUDY I (FE-2210)

Credits:3

Advanced work in Field Education. Pass/Fail only. Prerequisites: FE 1005 and FE 1006. To enroll, students must have made arrangements for an approved field education placement with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Students will meet as a learning cohort twice a month for 1.5-2.0 hours with Field Education faculty. Date and time for the semester will be set at the orientation session on September 5, 2018 at 1:30 p.m. Course is available for 1.5-3 units. [FE 1005, FE 1006; Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded]

ADV CONCURRENT FIELD STUDY II (FE-2211)

Credits:3

Advanced work in Field Education. Pass/Fail only. Prerequisites: FE 1005 and FE 1006. To enroll, students must have made arrangements for an approved field education placement with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Students will meet as a learning cohort twice a month for 1.5-2.0 hours with Field Education faculty. Date and time for the semester will be set at the orientation session on Jnauary 30, 2019 at 1:30 p.m. Course is available for 1.5-3 units. [FE 1005, FE 1006; Faculty Permission required; Auditors excluded]

MCL INTERNSHIP FALL (FE-2231)

Credits:3

This is the course number for the Fall semester internship in the Master of Community Leadership degree at ABSW. Students must consult with the ABSW Director of Contextual Education prior to the beginning of the semester, to plan their internships in ministry or community settings.

MCL INTERNSHIP SPRING (FE-2232)

Credits:3

This is the course number for the Spring semester internship in the Master of Community Leadership degree at ABSW. Students must consult with the ABSW Director of Contextual Education prior to the beginning of the semester, to plan their internships in ministry or community settings.

FIELD ED LEVEL III PART 1 (FE-3021)

Credits:0

FIELD EDUCATION LEVEL III, PART 1: Through a two-semester apostolic placement, students will deepen their engagement in (a) fundamental skills required for supervised ministry, (b) theological reflection for ministry and mission, (c) their understanding of the vocation & mission of the ordained & laity in the Church and world, in light of Catholic teaching, and (d) fundamental concepts and skills related to evangelization and collaborative ministry. Format: an approved, supervised ministry placement, normally involving 1.5-3.0 hours per week, with occasional contact with the Field Ed Director. Basis for Assessment: completion of a Learning Contract, written theological reflections, and documentation of apostolic skill learning. Course is normally taken Pass/Fail. This course is a prerequisite for Field Ed Level III, Part 2; the student will earn a total of 1.5 units of credit for Field Ed Level III, Parts 1, 2, 3, & 4 after passing the four courses. Intended audience: DSPT MDiv students. Prerequisite: Field Ed Level II, Parts 1 & 2. Course meets at St. Albert Priory in Oakland.

INTERNSHIP (FE-4011)

Credits:9

The internship provides a supervised ministry context in which the student develops and hones gifts and skills for ministerial leadership. The internship experience is designed to integrate studies and form MDiv students in the art of ministry--an interactive learning process reflecting the Spirit's work of weaving together the person that God has created and called in Christ through the practice of ministry, theological reflection, spiritual formation, constructive feedback, critique and evaluation. Course is available for 1-9 units. [Faculty Consent required]

CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION (FE-4012)

Credits:10

This course is for Starr King students engaged in part-time or full-time Clinical Pastoral Education. Participate in ministry to persons in crisis and engage in individual and group reflection. Didactic sessions draw together theoretical material from theology, the behavioral sciences, and pastoral care. Students learn to integrate theological understanding and knowledge of behavioral science with pastoral functioning. Upon completion, a written evaluation from the program supervisor will be placed into the student's permanent file. Discuss CPE with your advisor and then faculty. Final evaluation from CPE supervisor needs to be sent to faculty by the last day of the semester to receive credit. Students are responsible for applying for and securing a place in a CPE program. Please check the SKSM Student Handbook for more information. Relates to SKSM Threshold 5, MFC Comp 2. Course is available from 1-10 units. [Faculty consent required for Summer 2018; 30 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

CONGREGATIONAL FIELDWORK FALL (FE-4050)

Credits:4

Fieldwork is an opportunity to put into action the theory learned in the classroom. Working in a congregation gives the student a chance to develop their unique pastoral voice while navigating complexities of a congregation’s history, culture, systems and ethos. Fieldwork placements may include: teaching a religious education class for children or adults, working with a youth group, serving on a pastoral care team, and more. All congregational field work students meet monthly by Zoom to discuss learning goals and monthly learning themes with the professor. The professor's final evaluations of work is determined by monthly Zoom participation and the student's final assessment of their work. This course is for M.Div. students and may fulfill UU ministry requirements. Depending on the focus of the field work project, it can relate to the following Starr King Threshold Areas: Life in Religious Community and Interfaith Engagement, Prophetic Witness and Work, Spiritual Practice and Care for the Soul, Educating for Wholeness and Liberation, and Embodied Wisdom and Beauty. Requires approval from faculty advisor. This course is available for 1-4 units. [Faculty Consent required, Auditors excluded]

COMMUNITY FIELDWORK FALL (FE-4060)

Credits:5

Community Internships involve engagement at a field site from 16 to 40 hours a week, under weekly supervision at the site and the support of the SKSM Community Intern Reflection class. Community Internships include a variety of settings, such as supervised placements in a non-profit service agency or grassroots organization, hospice work, chaplaincy, teaching and more. They can also entail creating new projects such as starting a new organization or planning a conference. Those who register for this course should also register for Community Intern Integrative Reflection Spring. Students should discuss the internship with their advisor before making arrangements with the professor. Student and supervisor will discuss and sign a learning agreement at the outset of the internship. Midterm and final student/supervisor evaluations are also required. All forms are available on the SKSM Website. Please see Student Handbook and Contextual Education Handbook for more information. Relevance for specific SKSM thresholds and MFC competencies varies according to the nature of a student's field experience. Course is available for 0.5-5 units. [30 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

PARISH INTERNSHIP FALL (FE-4210)

Credits:10

This is a 10 month full-time (one year, 10 credits/semester) or part-time (two years, 5 credits/semester) ministry experience in a teaching congregation, under the supervision of a Minister in Final Fellowship (for UU students), working with an intern committee, and a professor at the school. For nonUU students, check with your denominational body to see if there are additional requirements for the congregational internship experience. Those who register for this course must also register for Congregational Intern Reflection Fall. This course is for M.Div students. The Intern Ministers meet monthly by Zoom to discuss progress on Learning Goals. UU students will use the UUA Internship Evaluation forms. During the Internship experience, there are opportunities for all 8 Starr King Threshold Areas to be explored, as well as the UU Ministerial Fellowship Committee Competency Areas. This course is available for 5-10 units.

PARISH INTERN REFLECTION FALL (FE-4212)

Credits:2

COMMUNITY INTERNSHIP FALL (FE-4220)

Credits:10

Community Internships involve engagement at a field site from 16 to 40 hours a week, under weekly supervision at the site and the support of the SKSM Community Intern Reflection class. Community Internships include a variety of settings, such as supervised placements in a non-profit service agency or grassroots organization, hospice work, chaplaincy, teaching and more. They can also entail creating new projects such as starting a new organization or planning a conference. Those who register for this course should also register for Community Intern Integrative Reflection Spring. Students should discuss the internship with their advisor before making arrangements with the professor. Student and supervisor will discuss and sign a learning agreement at the outset of the internship. Midterm and final student/supervisor evaluations are also required. All forms are available on the SKSM Website. Please see Student Handbook and Contextual Education Handbook for more information. Relevance for specific SKSM thresholds and MFC competencies varies according to the nature of a student's field experience. Course is available for 5-10 units. [30 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

COMMUNITY INTERN REFLECTN FALL (FE-4222)

Credits:2

This course is a peer group seminar for interns doing fieldwork in community field sites. It offers theo-ethical reflection, linking the experience in the internship to the student’s broad educational and vocational goals (praxis). The class is designed for students to assess their personal progress, gather support from peers and the instructor, integrate their internship experience into their degree program, and deepen theo-ethical practices to sustain religious leadership in community ministry. Students gather multi-religious sources of wisdom, which serve as touchstones for group theological reflection. The course includes a required weekly live web-based video seminar and frequent online discussion postings. This online course is synchronous on Zoom and counts as low residency; students must have consistent internet access to relevant technology. Evaluation is based on participation, depth of engagement with peers and resources, as well as written self-evaluations. Required for MDiv/ MASC students enrolled in credit for community internship during the same semester. Fulfills thresholds based on personal learning goals in the internship.[25 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

STL RESEARCH PRACTICUM (FE-4400)

Credits:0.5

In conjunction with the monthly program seminar, this course enables students enrolled in the STL and Th.M degree programs to fulfill their program requirement of complementing their studies with supervised ministry in a parish, school or other setting. Students must perform twenty to twenty-four hours of ministry per semester. Through reflection on this practical experience, students will deepen their understanding of how faith is inculturated and how culture shapes one's approach to ministry. This course is offered on a P/F basis. Students must enroll for .5 credit hours each semester during their degree program. There will be some readings assigned by the instructors.

STD RESEARCH PRACTICUM (FE-4401)

Credits:0.5

In conjunction with the monthly program seminar, this course enables students enrolled in the STD degree program to fulfill their program requirement of complementing their studies with supervised ministry in a parish, school or other setting. Students must perform twenty to twenty-four hours of ministry per semester. Through reflection on this practical experience, students will deepen their understanding of how faith is inculturated and how culture shapes one's approach to ministry. This course is offered on a P/F basis. Students must enroll for .5 credit hours each semester during their degree program. There will be some readings assigned by the instructors.

CHI IMMERSION SPIRIT PSYCH 1 (FEFT-1104)

Credits:1.5

For joint-program students participating in Chaplaincy Institute (ChI) modules as part of the Interfaith Studies Certificate. This is the first in a series of 2 modules (Pt. II offered in December). Modules must be taken consecutively. The Interfaith Spiritual Psychology intensives provide students with a holistic model of psycho-spiritual development that can be used for personal growth and for work with others. Curriculum integrates wisdom from various spiritual traditions: Kabbalah with Jungian, Developmental and Archetypal Psychology, Family Systems and Psychodynamic perspectives, as well as Astrology and alchemy. This course is only for students who have been admitted to the SKSM-ChI joint program and is not available to other SKSM students or to students from other GTU schools. This course does not count toward residency requirements. Classes held Oct. 17-21, approximately 9am-5:00pm (Typically includes 1 evening class). Relates to SKSM Thresholds 5, 1, 8; MFC Competencies 2, 3, 1 [15 max enrollment]

CHI IMMERSION SPIRIT PSYCH 2 (FEFT-1105)

Credits:1.5

For joint-program students participating in Chaplaincy Institute (ChI) modules as part of the Interfaith Studies Certificate. This is the second in of a 2 module series (Pt I is offered in Sept; modules must be taken consecutively). This training integrates wisdom from various spiritual tradition: Kabbalah, Jungian, Developmental & Archetypal Psychology, Family Systems & Psychodynamic perspectives, as well as Astrology & alchemy. After foundational work on Ego Development and Identity formation n Part One, Part Two explores Soul & Spiritual Development more fully. This course is only for students who have been admitted to the SKSM-ChI joint program and is not available to other SKSM students or to students from other GTU schools. This course does not count toward residency requirements. Classes held Dec 12-16, approximately 9am-5: 30pm (typically includes 1 evening session). Relates to SKSM Thresholds 5, 8; MFC Competencies 2, 3. [12 max enrollment]

CHI IMMERSION JUDAISM (FEFT-1106)

Credits:1.5

For joint-program students participating in Chaplaincy Institute (ChI) modules as part of the Interfaith Studies Certificate. Students will explore the sacred texts and aspects of spiritual care particular to Judaism, as well as attend a local Shabbat service. Other areas of study will include: the importance of research in spiritual care; officiating at weddings; and an introduction to spirituality and aging. The Community & Social Transformation (CMT) curriculum will examine social change theory as a tool for justice. This course is only for students who have been admitted to the SKSM-ChI joint program and is not available to other SKSM students or to students from other GTU schools. This course does not count toward residency requirements. Classes held Sept. 12-16 from approximately 9am-5pm (usually includes 1 evening). Relates to SKSM Thresholds 1, 5, and 3; MFC Competencies 1, 2. [15 max enrollment]

CHI IMMERSION HINDUISM & SIKHISM (FEFT-1107)

Credits:1.5

For joint-program students participating in Chaplaincy Institute (ChI) modules as part of the Interfaith Studies Certificate. In addition to the big picture view of Hindu and Sikh traditions and beliefs in class, more of this month's learning will be through immersion, with visits to a Sikh and Hindu temples. Other classes this module include spiritual care at end-of-life, spiritual care with those on the margins, and an introduction to grief & loss. This course is only for students who have been admitted to the SKSM-ChI joint program and is not available to other SKSM students or to students from other GTU schools. This course does not count toward residency requirements. Classes held Nov. 14-18, approximately 9am-5pm (typically includes 1 evening session). Relates to SKSM Thresholds 5, 1, 3, 7; MFC Competencies 1, 3, 4. [15 max enrollment]

SOC CHG FIELD/IMMERS ELECTIVE (FERS-3000)

Credits:3

CSSC & MAST programs field work arranged in consultation and with approval of the Director of Community Engaged Learning. To enroll, students must have had consultation with Field Education faculty about planned project with broad sector or area of interest focus and confirmed mentor active in that field. Student must establish a schedule of twice-monthly consultations with FE faculty over semester to discuss project status. Depending on number of students enrolled, Field Education faculty may assign twice-monthly learning cohort meetings. [Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded]

SOCIAL CHANGE FIELD WORK CAPSTONE (FERS-3001)

Credits:3

Required course for MAST program. CSSC and MAST students attend combined class in spring semester. Field work arranged in consultation and with approval of the Director of Community Engaged Learning. To enroll, students must have had consultation with Field Education faculty about planned project with broad sector or area of interest focus and confirmed mentor active in that field. Participants collaborate with each other, the faculty instructor, and their mentors to draft learning objectives and establish criteria for assessing the outcomes of their field work and immersion experiences. Participants meet together in person twice monthly on the 2nd & 4th Thursday during the semester and provide regular progress reports online through a dedicated website. Participants will submit a final project in this course (such as a vocational plan, a social venture proposal, an educational and/or spiritual formation module for community organizing, among others) based on their field work/immersion experiences geared toward a specific area of social change. Draft iterations of the project are submitted online throughout the semester for feedback from colleagues, mentors, and the faculty instructor. Classes at the end of the semester are used to present their final projects and solicit observations and proposals for next steps. [SPFT 1082 (8182), FTRS 2973; Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded] Class meets: 2nd & 4th Thursday, 2/7/2019-5/16/2019, 1:00pm-4:00pm; Project Presentation on Wednesday, 5/1/2019, 4:00pm-8:00pm at PSR Bade Museum.

MAST SOCIAL CHANGE FIELD WORK (FERS-3002)

Credits:3

Required course for MAST program. CSSC and MAST students attend combined class in spring semester. Field work arranged in consultation and with approval of the Director of Community Engaged Learning. To enroll, students must have had consultation with Field Education faculty about planned project with broad sector or area of interest focus and confirmed mentor active in that field. Participants collaborate with each other, the faculty instructor, and their mentors to draft learning objectives and establish criteria for assessing the outcomes of their field work and immersion experiences. Participants meet together in person twice monthly on the 2nd & 4th Thursday during the semester and provide regular progress reports online through a dedicated website. Participants will submit a final project in this course (such as a vocational plan, a social venture proposal, an educational and/or spiritual formation module for community organizing, among others) based on their field work/immersion experiences geared toward a specific area of social change. Draft iterations of the project are submitted online throughout the semester for feedback from colleagues, mentors, and the faculty instructor. Classes at the end of the semester are used to present their final projects and solicit observations and proposals for next steps. MAST students are required to do an additional 6-8 page paper: Social Analysis of Social Change Field Work Setting/Context. [SPFT 1082 (8182), FTRS 2973; Faculty permission required; Auditors excluded] Class meets: 2nd & 4th Thursdays, 2/7/2019-5/16/2019, from 1:00pm to 4:00pm at a location TBD; Project Presentations on Wednesday, 5/1/2019, from 4:00pm to 8:00pm at PSR Bade Museum.

INTERDISCIPLINARY LECTURES (FT-1062)

Credits:1.5

Each week a different member of the SFTS faculty will address a common theme from the perspective of his or her discipline, providing students an opportunity to broaden and integrate learning in a key field. The course is required for all MDiv students entering in/after fall 2014 and is open to all masters degree students. Attendance is mandatory, a brief reflection paper is required. Pass/fail only.

SPIRITUAL FORMATION (FT-1066)

Credits:0

[Not available for cross-registration] This course is designed to help students cultivate and gain knowledge of spiritual practices that foster lively faith and healthy leadership that can build up the Christian faith and ministry of individuals and communities in an Anglican context. Over the course of several semesters, students will cultivate spiritual practices that will sustain them in their vocations, and skills that enable them to engage communities in spiritual work; develop spiritual practices that support their faithful life as Christian disciples; recognize how habitual spiritual practices may foster resilience and faith; learn how to teach holistic Christian formation practices to others; integrate rhythms of communal worship into life habits; and learn to recognize the challenging tension between community responsibility, personal self-care, and time apart for rest and retreat. Course activities include: engagement in spiritual direction; participation in worship and leadership; spiritual retreats and quiet days; participation in formation peer groups. This course is required each semester for all CDSP MDiv and CAS students.

SPIRITUAL FORMATION (FT-1067)

Credits:0

[Not available for cross-registration] This course is designed to help students cultivate and gain knowledge of spiritual practices that foster lively faith and healthy leadership that can build up the Christian faith and ministry of individuals and communities. Over the course of several semesters, students will cultivate spiritual practices that will sustain them in their vocations, and skills that enable them to engage communities in spiritual work; develop spiritual practices that support their faithful life as Christian disciples; recognize how habitual spiritual practices may foster resilience and faith; learn how to teach holistic Christian formation practices to others; integrate rhythms of communal worship into life habits; and learn to recognize the challenging tension between community responsibility, personal self-care, and time apart for rest and retreat. Course activities include: engagement in spiritual direction; participation in worship; participation in formation peer groups. This course is required each semester for all CDSP MTS students

WRITING FOR GRAD THEO STUDIES (FT-1075)

Credits:1.5

This course will examine writing genres and skills central to graduate theological study. Within their degree programs, students already produce many different kinds of writing, such as personal reflection papers, analyses of case studies, and research papers. This course aims to orient students to these various genres and their distinctive purposes. We will identify key conventions of common academic and theological genres. We will also identify and practice methods of reading and writing that will help students write effectively throughout their coursework. Special attention will be given to two important and importantly different genres: the theological reflection and the academic research paper. Additional genres and writing practices studied will be selected based on student interest. Through writing exercises, workshops of student writing, and discussions of exemplars, students will develop, reflect on, and refine their abilities to communicate clear and complex ideas for their seminary studies and beyond. Meeting times TBD.

THEOLOGICAL WRITING I (FT-1109)

Credits:1.5

First semester of a required course for entering ABSW seminarians - open to other GTU students. Students will learn skills of academic writing, critical analysis, and articulation of objectives. Writing samples and instructor feedback integrate theory and praxis.

GRADUATE THEOLOGICAL WRITING (FT-1111)

Credits:1.5

Second semester of a required course for entering ABSW seminarians - open to other GTU students. Students will learn skills of academic writing, critical analysis, and articulation of objectives. Writing samples and instructor feedback integrate theory and praxis.

CHURCH LEADERSHIP (FT-1130)

Credits:3

To prepare as ministry leaders in the 21st century, students will be exposed to new paradigms of church leadership. This introductory course designed to provide Masters of Divinity Students with basic principles of church as non-profit administration and management including navigating boards and organizational structures as systems, understanding budgets, assessing organizational capacity, developing staff and /or laity, and understanding social location (i.e,. contextual /cultural dynamics of the neighborhood and community). Students will learn organizational concepts, such as transformational leadership, adaptive change, conflict resolution, fund development, and member equipping. Course will include periodic papers and as a final project - an organizational assessment.

SPANISH FOR WORSHIP I (FT-1145)

Credits:1.5

A beginning course on Spanish language acquisition focused on worship leadership in Spanish. “Spanish for Worship I” students will study grammatical principles and will practice their usage in liturgical and biblical sources. The course will include, among other things, class discussions on biblical material, grammar quizzes, liturgical presentation projects, and a visit to a Spanish-speaking worship service of the students’ choice. While the course will utilize Lutheran liturgical materials, the course is open to all GTU students. [30 max enrollment]

SPANISH FOR WORSHIP II (FT-1146)

Credits:1.5

Spanish for Worship II is a course on Spanish language acquisition focused on worship leadership in Spanish. This course builds and expands on the grammatical and practical work covered in Spanish for Worship I, a prerequisite for this course. This course will include, among other things, class discussions on biblical material, discussions on selections from Luther’s Small Catechism, liturgical presentation projects, a visit to a Spanish-speaking worship service, and the production and sharing of a statement of faith written in Spanish. [FT-1145 Spanish for Worship I; 30 max enrollment]

ACAD THEO WRITING & RESEARCH (FT-1203)

Credits:2

This course is a general introduction to the tasks of conducting research in order to write academic theological arguments. The course focuses on honing the skills you already have in order to research more efficiently, and writing more precisely in a theological setting (papers, sermons, bible studies, etc.). Prerequisite: RSFT-1120 Methods and Hermeneutics I. This course is offered as a two-week intensive starting the week of January 14, 2019 and ending the week of January 21, 2019. Meets Monday-Friday, 8:10am-11:10am, at PSR 6. [30 max enrollment]

ORGANIZING FOR PUBLIC MINISTRY (FT-1239)

Credits:3

This course focuses on developing skills, tools, and theoretical/reflective capacity for community organizing around multiple issues within a ministry context, and is taught by a team of experienced trainers from the Industrial Areas Foundation (IAF), the nation's oldest network of faith-based and community organizations, with additional theological reflection and context provided by a CDSP professor. Format will include lectures, discussion, role-play, small group work, and reading. For those taking the course for academic credit, additional reading and writing are required. The course is open to all members of the seminary community and will also include local non-credit participants from community organizing projects. Class meets daily, 1/20/19-1/25/19, from 8:30am to 5:30pm at CDSP.

Leadership in Ministry (FT-1902)

Credits:3

An introduction to a variety of multi-disciplinary tools for leadership in ministry. Through shared learning and case studies, together with theological reflection on our own practices, we will develop the courage and imagination needed for leadership. Pre-course readings, lecture, discussion, case studies. Evaluation: class participation, final paper. Audience: Low-residency students.

SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION IN ACTION (FT-1927)

Credits:1.5

Under the PSR Stackable Curriculum, every student will engage in experiential learning during the intersession of their first or second year. Students will engage with the principles of community organizing and transformational change within a theological and social justice framework. Course begins with readings, lectures, and discussions. 3-4 Bay Area social justice organizations and movements will present opportunities for onsite work in various topic areas. Once students select a site, they will participate for 24 hours of experiential learning work (over 5.5 days), then re-convene for final discussions, summary, and closing. Students following Stackable Curriculum programs get priority registration; others may participate as space is available. Course meets daily, 1/14/19-1/16/19 and 1/22/19 from 10am-2pm at Holbrook 133. [24 max enrollment]

PRESBYTERIAN (PCUSA) POLITY (FT-2070)

Credits:3

This course will familiarize students with the Book of Order of the Presbyterian Church (USA), with particular emphasis on the Form of Government and the Book of Discipline. Lecture/seminar format. Evaluation by participation, presentations and ordination-type exams. The course will be approached from a mission perspective. Intended for PC USA M. Div. students.

VITAL WORSHIP IN THE 21ST CEN (FT-2172)

Credits:3

Worship is the portal through which visitors find a spiritual home, members grow to greater discipleship and the whole congregation is inspired to "go and do likewise" in the world. The need is great for vital worship at the epicenter of congregational life. This core worship course for MDiv, MA/MTS, or DMin students will explore not only theology and history of worship as well as ritual theory, but also the depths of spirituality, excellence of practice in sensory-rich communication and intentional preparation needed by leaders of the 21st century church for worship that revitalizes congregations. Course is a combination of lecture, discussion, and practice. Evaluation is based on written papers and practical projects. Class will meet in person every two (2) weeks with brief online reflections on readings due every week.

XN FTH FRMTN:PEDGIES & PRACTS (FT-2255)

Credits:1.5

This course will explore theological understandings of leadership, various styles of leadership and their effectiveness in different settings, dynamics of power and appropriate professional boundaries, and the practical skills needed to run a small non-profit such as a church parish. Students will engage material on these subjects through course readings, class discussions, reflection papers, and a group project and presentation. Required for PLTS M.Div. students prior to internship. This course is offered as a seven-week intensive starting the week of April 1, 2019 and ending the week of May 13, 2019. Meets Thursdays 1:45-5:00pm. [30 max enrollment]

PUBLIC THEOLOGY INTERNSHIP (FT-2542)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by LeAnn Flesher and Michael Mathews. This is the fifth of five courses in the Public Theology Certificate Program. In this course students will participate in a semester long internship in which they will work with a carefully selected mentor that has expertise in the student’s area of interest. Class Meeting Dates: (fall 2018): September 7--BBQ w/ mentors and cohort #2 (6:00 pm); October 12--Cohort #1 meets to share mentorship experiences (7:00 to 9:00 pm); December 7--Final meeting & celebration; Cohort #1 creates public presentation of project--the wider community invited (there will be food)--6:00-8:00 pm.

CHURCH ADMINISTRATION AS MINISTRY (FT-2820)

Credits:3

Ministry is relational. This is crucial in all areas of parish administration-budgets, pledge drives, fundraisers, building campaigns, staff supervision, volunteer support, facilities, safety, long-range planning. We will consider ministerial balance and boundaries. What is the pastor's role? Where to prod and when to defer to lay leaders? When to hold a program or a committee together or let it fall apart? How to hire staff and what to pay? We will interview some experts (who learned the hard way). In discussions and papers, we will reflect on articles, books, case studies, videos, sermons and presentations based on your needs, goals and gifts. Open to UUs and other students on an ordination track. [Faculty Consent required; 21 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

ORGNZTNL LEADRSHP CH & COMMNTY (FT-2923)

Credits:3

This course is an excursion into various forms of organizational leadership in church and community. It includes pre-requisites for leadership, defining leadership, and embodying leadership. The course lifts up the importance of the self and what leaders bring to leadership. It explores the dynamics between the leaders and the communities (or organizations) they serve. The course seeks to the soul of the students. Course format: seminar. Evaluations based on class discussion, reflection papers, research papers. Intended audience: MDiv/MA/MTS/MAST/Dmin

21ST CENTURY EVANGELISM (FT-3950)

Credits:1.5

This course introduces the theological and practical dimensions of evangelism in the context of the 21st century and with special emphasis on the United Methodist Church. We shall investigate the theological basis of the Christian evangelistic message and think together about the ways this message can be shared in our present reality. Class format: seminar, lecture/class-discussion. Evaluation method: attendance and participation, small reflection papers, book review, and final paper. Course meets daily, 1/22/19-1/25/19, from 8:10am-12:30pm at PSR 5.

VITAL WORSHIP IN THE 21ST CEN (FT-8217)

Credits:3

Worship is the portal through which visitors find a spiritual home, members grow to greater discipleship and the whole congregation is inspired to "go and do likewise" in the world. The need is great for vital worship at the epicenter of congregational life. This core worship course for MDiv, MA/MTS, or DMin students will explore not only theology and history of worship as well as ritual theory, but also the depths of spirituality, excellence of practice in sensory-rich communication and intentional preparation needed by leaders of the 21st century church for worship that revitalizes congregations. Course is a combination of lecture, discussion, and practice. Evaluation is based on written papers and practical projects. Coursework during the semester is a combination of video lectures, reading, brief online reflections, and five (5) video conference link check-ins.

WRESTLING WITH THE QUESTIONS (FTBS-5000)

Credits:3

Wrestling with the Questions: The Bible, Midrash, and Inquiry Based Preaching: “Why?” asks the persistent two-year old, having discovered one of the most powerful words in the English language. Contemporary pedagogy recognizes that helping students develop their own questions, can help deepen learning much more than providing well-rehearsed answers. But the value of questions is not new. From Abraham to Jesus, the biblical story turns on the questions. “Am I my brother’s keeper?” “Who is my neighbor?” In studying texts, the ancient Rabbis developed the Jewish tradition of Midrash, which uses questions to help the faithful reader slow down and live more fully into the sacred story. Drawing on the Scripture’s art of staying with the questions and the Jewish tradition of Midrash, we will explore an “inquiry based” approach to preaching. Format and Evaluation: One week intensive with preliminary activity on-line for all students. 1.5 credits evaluated through a Midrash on a text (due after the course). 3.0 credits will do additional on-line activity after the course, evaluated through 5 sermon series outline, Midrash and video/audio/manuscript on one inquiry based sermon (due after the course) Audience: DMin and pastors seeking Continuing Education Units (2 units) May take for 3.0 or 1.5 units.

Wrestling with the Questions (FTBS-5900)

Credits:3

Wrestling with the Questions: The Bible, Midrash, and Inquiry Based Preaching: “Why?” asks the persistent two-year old, having discovered one of the most powerful words in the English language. Contemporary pedagogy recognizes that helping students develop their own questions, can help deepen learning much more than providing well-rehearsed answers. But the value of questions is not new. From Abraham to Jesus, the biblical story turns on the questions. “Am I my brother’s keeper?” “Who is my neighbor?” In studying texts, the ancient Rabbis developed the Jewish tradition of Midrash, which uses questions to help the faithful reader slow down and live more fully into the sacred story. Drawing on the Scripture’s art of staying with the questions and the Jewish tradition of Midrash, we will explore an “inquiry based” approach to preaching. Format and Evaluation: One week intensive with preliminary activity on-line for all students. 1.5 credits evaluated through a Midrash on a text (due after the course). 3.0 credits will do additional on-line activity after the course, evaluated through 5 sermon series outline, Midrash and video/audio/manuscript on one inquiry based sermon (due after the course) Audience: DMin and pastors seeking Continuing Education Units (2 units) May take for 3.0 or 1.5 units.

PRISON MINISTRY PRACTICUM (FTCE-2573)

Credits:1

This course offers both a theoretical and experiential introduction to prison ministry with an emphasis on the unique theological, psychosocial and ministerial needs of the incarcerated. Students will study the historical roots of correctional chaplaincy in the United States, professional ethics, prison culture, racism, gender issues in prison ministry and restorative justice alternatives to incarceration. The course will focus on practical tools needed for successful prison ministry. As a contextual theology course it will be offered entirely on site at San Quentin State Prison. Inmates will participate in lectures, discussion of readings, role-playing exercises and theological reflection. Course meets Fridays, 11/2, 11/9, 11/16, 11/30 and 12/7/18 from 12:40-3:30pm. [7 max enrollment]

UU Ministerial Leadership (FTED-2100)

Credits:3

This CORE intensive course focuses on the theological foundations and habits of mind necessary to be a self-defined leader among Unitarian Universalists, either in congregations or in other UU settings. Students will have the opportunity to test their current skills in a series of real-world challenges likely to be faced in parish or community settings. The goal is to allow student the chance to confront possible issues while the stakes are low. Role playing, small group work and reflection papers will be required. This is a required course for the M.Div. program. Relates to SKSM Thresholds 1 & 5 and MFC Comps 2, 5 & 7 Students must contact the instructor via e-email prior to enrolling in order to receive permission to register. Registration is contingent upon faculty approval.

UU Polity (FTHS-4077)

Credits:1.5

CELEBRATIONAL STYLE (FTLS-4725)

Credits:3

This course is designed to acquaint students preparing for presbyteral ordination in the Roman Catholic Church with the principle rites of the Church's liturgy. Its goal is to develop prayerful leaders of prayer and to develop in presiders the necessary skills for gathering the ecclesial body and celebrating the sacramental rites of the Church. Students will prepare and preside at rites and will also work together on larger liturgical rites. Small group gatherings outside of class for 1 ½ hours a week will enable more familiarity and personal critique. [Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded]

GOSPEL OF THE MASSES (FTRS-2100)

Credits:3

Gospel of the Masses: Seeing God Through the Eyes of the Marginalized. This is an immersion course that engages with both the persecution and resilience of marginalized people in the United States. We will spend most of our class time on the streets of Oakland, observing, listening, and analyzing the intersectionality of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and immigration status in perpetuating generational marginalization. We will have the privilege to listen and learn from various communities of color - community members, justice practitioners, activists, and local theologians and ministers. We will also pay close attention to the sacred movement of God and the deep spirituality of marginalized people in our observations and interactions. Assignments include pre-course readings and summary/reflection papers, and an 8-page minimum post-course reflection paper. A $100 program fee will be assessed for each student and lunch will be provided daily. Class meets: Sunday, 1/13/2019, from 10:00am to 3:00pm; then daily, 1/14/2019-1/18/2019, from 9:00am to 5:00pm; in Oakland.

LEADERSHIP FOR MINISTRY I (FTRS-2281)

Credits:3

FTRS 2281: This course is co-taught by Caroline McCall and Susanna Singer. This is the first half of a two-semester capstone course sequence for graduating CDSP MDiv students. It can be taken as an elective by students in other programs. This course will involve constructive practical work on ministry leadership., including theological reflection, discerning and securing a specific call in ministry, training in models of leadership, evangelism, congregational development, and the spirituality of ministry. An integral part of this course is a placement in a congregation or institution, including 5 hours per week spent on site. Lecture/presentations, discussion and several small individual projects, peer theological reflection, plus one major group project. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment]

LEADERSHIP FOR MINISTRY II (FTRS-2282)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Caroline McCall and Susanna Singer. This is the second half of a two-semester capstone course sequence for graduating CDSP MDiv students. It can be taken as an elective by studnets in other programs. This course will involve constructive practical work on ministry leadership., including theological reflection, contextual analysis, training in models of leadership, evangelism, congregational development, church administration, finances and fundraising, and the spirituality of ministry. An integral part of this course is a placement in a congregation or institution, including 4-5 hours per week spent on site. Lecture/presentations, discussion and several small individual projects, plus one major group project. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment]

TRANSFORMATIVE LEADERSHIP (FTRS-2973)

Credits:3

Transformational Leadership entails a dynamic relationship between the leader and the community of which the leader is a part. It entails developing strategies that enhance the probability of achieving shared goals & visions. In the quest for a more just and compassionate world transformational leadership challenges dormant systems of oppression. The course explores various expressions of transformational leadership resulting from prophetic imagination and social entrepreneurship. Seminar format, evaluation through class participation, reflection papers and other papers. Audience: MAST, MDiv, MA/MTS, DMin.

DESIGN THINKING FOR SOCIAL CHANGE (FTRS-3400)

Credits:1.5

"Design Thinking" is a human-centered approach to problem solving and new product development that emerged from the high-tech, entrepreneurial world of Silicon Valley. It has evolved over the years into a process that is rooted in community-based research, ongoing testing of assumptions, a resistance to immediate answers for the sake of deeper insights, and hypothesizing future consequences. This course introduces the design thinking model with leading design thinking consultants--including an interactive workshop in which students collaborate on a realistic design challenge--and opportunities to adapt this model for leadership skills in both congregational settings and non-profit organizations for effective social change strategies. The class meets on six Saturdays (in addition to outside research and coaching sessions): 3/2 (8:30-10:30am); 3/16 (8:30am-5:30pm); 4/6 (8:30am-12:30pm); 4/27 (3:00-4:30pm), 5/11 (8:30am-12:30pm); and 5/18 (8:30am-12:30pm).

ENGAGING COMMUN OF LIBERATION (FTRS-3834)

Credits:3

This immersion course in Cuernavaca, Mexico, will explore communities of liberation in modern Mexico, focusing on the LGBTQ and women’s communities and on issues of economic justice within Mexico and between Mexico and the United States. Students will develop their knowledge of written, spoken and read Spanish through language classes and immersive living experience with native Spanish speakers. The program will include multiple field trips to sites of cultural and artistic importance, lectures on related topics, and dialogue with community members. Some knowledge of Spanish is suggested but not required. Application required - see https://tinyurl.com/2019-PSR-MEX for application and due dates. Faculty may request interview. Limited number of participants, open to community members/auditors. There will be 2-3 required pre-trip classroom sessions during Fall 2018 semester for both academic discussion & logistics. Course meets 1/5/19-1/19/19. [Faculty consent required; interview required; Auditors with faculty permission]

Community Organizing I & II (FTRS-4501)

Credits:3

Community Organizing: Session I & II Faith and Community Organizing: Prophets, Power, and Social Transformation. Now more than ever, we need creative, determined and spiritually- and morally--rooted organizers to aid in the work of building strong, resilient and responsive communities. These uncertain times demand a new generation of community leaders – religious and not – who are morally grounded, relationship focused, and skillful at building and using community power. From these strong foundations, individuals become more able to carry out the work of social movements – the large waves of change that mark this time as a moment for resistance. In this class, we will examine and try out several different models of organizing, explore our own personal paths to and styles of leadership, look at the unique and urgent work facing today's prophetic leaders, and uncover ways to build and re-build community life (based in spiritual teaching and practice) that lead to needed social change. Throughout this class, we will delve into some traditional as well as some new ways of thinking about community organizing in and outside of faith contexts. We will also take a look at the difference between community organizing and social movements, and understand how congregations and other community institutions can be anchors in helping individuals make meaning in the rapidly-changing, politically-charged moment in which we live. Each interactive session will combine discussion of organizing theory and impact with practical skill-building. Students will be challenged to read, reflect, write, and put teachings into action in mini-organizing campaigns. This course is designed for students, former students, and community partners who are serious about integrating social justice into their leadership, who want to learn how to use organizing as a congregational or community development tool, and/or who want to better understand the role that faith communities can (and need to) play in movements for social change. Course meets weekdays, 6/04/18 - 6/15/18, from 9am-1pm.

LEADERSHIP FOR MINISTRY (FTRS-8288)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Caroline McCall and Susanna Singer. This is the first half of a two-semester capstone course sequence for graduating CDSP MDiv students. It can be taken as an elective by students in other programs. This course will involve constructive practical work on ministry leadership., including theological reflection, discerning and securing a specific call in ministry, training in models of leadership, evangelism, congregational development, and the spirituality of ministry. An integral part of this course is a placement in a congregation or institution, including 5 hours per week spent on site. Lecture/presentations, discussion and several small individual projects, plus one major group project. Synchronous on-line meetings for oral theological reflection will be scheduled one hour every other week. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment]

LEADERSHIP FOR MINISTRY II (FTRS-8289)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Caroline McCall and Susanna Singer. This is the first half of a two-semester capstone course sequence for graduating CDSP MDiv students. It can be taken as an elective by students in other programs. This course will involve constructive practical work on ministry leadership, including theological reflection, discerning and securing a specific call in ministry, training in models of leadership, evangelism, congregational development, and the spirituality of ministry. An integral part of this course is a placement in a congregation or institution, including 5 hours per week spent on site. On-line lecture/presentations and discussions and several small individual projects/papers, plus one major group project. Students are expected to arrange synchronous on-line meetings for peer theological reflection for at least one hour every other week. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment]

CANON LAW:INTRO & MARRIAGE (FTST-2336)

Credits:3

This course is a combination of two aspects of the field of canon law. The first half of the course presents an overview of the 1983 Code of Canon Law, giving its origins and the legal traditions on which it is built. Special emphasis is on the pastoral application of the foundational principles of law and an examination of the rights and obligations of the Christian Faithful. The second half of the course covers the seven sacraments with an extended time on the sacrament of marriage. Both the celebration of marriage as the law prescribes and the work of marriage tribunals when a marriage ends in divorce are studied in detail. [25 max enrollment]

REGISTERED AT UCB (GTUC-6000)

Credits:0

Course for those Joint Degree students registered at the University of California, Berkeley and not taking any GTU courses for a specific semester.

INTRODUCTION TO PREACHING (HM-1001)

Credits:3

Introduction to the composition and delivery of sermons with attention given to hermeneutical and theological issues. Examination of selected homiletical models. Practice preaching. Instructor and class critique. Sermon recording option. SFTS core course.

PROPHETIC PREACHING (HM-1003)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Jana Childers and Yolanda Norton. This course exists at the intersection of biblical studies, preaching and worship. Students will examine the character and nature of biblical prophecy. The course also asks students to examine examples of prophetic preaching in various cultural traditions. Students will be asked to engage different social issues and currents in the sermons that they write, preach, and evaluate.

FOUNDATIONS OF PREACHING (HM-1073)

Credits:3

In this course, the student is given the fundamental elements of preaching, preparation of Scriptural text for proclamation, the study and prayer over the text of Scripture, the composition of a homily founded upon and flowing from the text to facilitate an encounter with Jesus and His saving grace and the actual practice of proclaiming the Scriptures and preaching upon them. [Faculty Consent required; 12 max enrollment]

Intro to Preaching & Preaching and Storytelling (HM-1900)

Credits:3

Introduction to Preaching & Preaching and Storytelling - This course will serve as a foundational course in homiletics for M.Div. students. Utilizing a combination of lectures, class discussions, and in-class exercises, we will begin by discussing the role of preaching in the church from a theological/pastoral point-of-view. Subsequent class discussions will focus on the move from text to sermon, the shape of the sermon, the role of imagination in crafting a sermon, the role of the congregation in the preaching event, and general questions related to the preparation and delivery of sermons. Each student will preach once during the course and will submit a self-evaluation paper following the course. Prerequisite: an introductory course in Biblical studies

INTRODUCTION TO HOMILETICS (HM-2100)

Credits:3

This is a basic course in the theory and practice of sermon construction and delivery. The class will focus on lectionary-based preaching in a eucharistic context. Students will practice preaching and will also be expected to offer constructive criticism of one another’s homilies. There will be reading and discussion of various models of homily preparation and structure. Students will preach three times in class plus one outside homily. Registration is limited to CDSP students ONLY for Early Registration. The class will be open to all during General Registration, space permitting. [Faculty Consent required; 12 max enrollment]

LITURGICAL PREACHING (HM-2230)

Credits:3

In this course, the student is given the fundamental elements of preaching, preparation of Scriptural text for proclamation, the study and prayer over the text of Scripture, the composition of a homily founded upon and flowing from the text to facilitate an encounter with Jesus and His saving grace and the actual practice of proclaiming the Scriptures and preaching upon them. In this course, the student will explore the elements of preaching within the context of the liturgy of the Church and its celebration of the sacraments. [Faculty Consent required; 12 max enrollment]

BIBLICAL PREACHING (HM-2245)

Credits:3

This course is designed to introduce students to the necessary elements of biblical preaching. Students will learn and appropriate a particular biblical exegetical method for preaching in order to prepare, preach and reflect upon three sermons throughout the course. Particular attention will be paid to the effect context has on the preaching task. Through seminar discussion, lectures, preparation and preaching of sermons, oral and written sermon response, and various writing assignments (including online posts), students will begin to develop and articulate their own theology of proclamation. [NT-1002 Introduction to New Testament, RSFT-1120 Methods and Hermeneutics I, RSFT-1121 Methods and Hermeneutics II. Concurrent: BS-2245 Exegesis Workshop: Greek; 12 max enrollment]

Preaching and Storytelling (HM-2900)

Credits:1.5

We live in a time of competing narratives, and transformative preaching requires preachers to create and deliver compelling narratives. This course will explore the art of storytelling and how it can enable such preaching. We will use narrative theory to examine the poetics of storytelling. How do the elements of narrative affect us when we read or hear stories? The course will employ an inductive methodology. We will listen to recordings of stories told by gifted storytellers from a variety of cultures. How do these narrative artists go about their craft? What can we learn from them about both the structure and the delivery of stories? We will consider how preachers can incorporate storytelling in our preaching and will use in-class exercises each day to work on our own storytelling skills. The course is offered both to active preachers as continuing education as well as to M.Div. students. Each student will preach once during the course of this class (2 CEU's).

HISTORY/THEOLOGY OF PREACHING (HM-4015)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Shauna Hannan and Sangyil Park. This seminar-style course is a study of representative treatises on preaching beginning with Augustine’s De Doctrina Christiana leading up to contemporary homiletical theory. The influences of classical rhetoric and theological commitments upon various homiletical theories will be examined. The course is required for GTU Ph.D. students in Homiletics. Advanced Master’s students are welcome and encouraged to request permission to take the course. [Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded]

HISTORY & THEOLOGY OF PREACHING (HM-5015)

Credits:3

This seminar-style course is a study of representative treatises on preaching beginning with Augustine’s De Doctrina Christiana leading up to contemporary homiletical theory. The influences of classical rhetoric and theological commitments upon various homiletical theories will be examined. The course is required for GTU Ph.D. students in Homiletics. Advanced Master’s students are welcome and encouraged to request permission to take the course. [12 max enrollment]

HOMILETICAL PEDAGOGY (HM-6010)

Credits:3

This doctoral level course is required for GTU Ph.D. students with a concentration in homiletics. The course consists of observing, participating in and reflecting on various components of an introductory preaching course. In addition, the course will include a seminar-style component in which students will present mini-lectures, share book reviews, and workshop an Introductory Preaching course syllabus. [12 max enrollment]

INTRODUCTION TO PREACHING (HM-8101)

Credits:3

Introduction to the composition and delivery of sermons with attention given to hermeneutical and theological issues. Examination of selected homiletical models. Practice preaching. Instructor and class critique. Sermon recording option. SFTS core course. Online version of course HM-1001 [8 max enrollment]

INTRODUCTION TO PREACHING (HM-8102)

Credits:3

FALL 2018 SECTION: This online course is designed to enable the students to learn the theoretical and practical elements of contemporary preaching; students will be guided to enhance the practical skills of biblical exegesis and the development and delivery of their sermons that are relevant in today's world. The readings for the class will include diverse theological and cultural traditions to expand students' horizon. Students will preach two sermons for the class. [Auditors excluded]

INTRO CROSS CULTURAL PREACHNG (HMLS-4075)

Credits:3

Introduction to Preaching in a Cross Cultural Context: This non-lectionary, thematic preaching course embraces counter oppressive ministry through worship and the arts. Hands on learning will combine the sharing and peer review of brief homilies with exercises aimed at identifying your authentic preaching voice. Each student will also deliver two full-length sermons in class. Questions of how to make our worship services more relevant in today’s culturally shifting world will be explored through thea/ological study of homiletics through a libratory lens and an engagement with issues of cultural appropriation and misappropriation in Unitarian Universalist liturgical practice. Students from all traditions welcome. Pre-requisites: ECO core intensive or equivalent. Relates to Starr King thresholds 1, 2, 6 and 7, and MFC Competency 1. This course is high residency only. Students must contact the instructor via e-email prior to enrolling in order to receive permission to register. Registration is contingent upon faculty approval. [Faculty Consent required; 10 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (HN-207)

Credits:3

BUDDHISM AND BUDDHIST STUDIES (HR-1501)

Credits:3

This course introduces the student to the Buddhist tradition and the academic study of Buddhism. The course covers the development of Buddhism across Asia, its history major texts, lineages, practices and doctrines. Secondarily, we will discuss the academic discipline of Buddhist studies, its own historical development, methodologies, orientations and assumptions. This course is required for the IBS Certificate in Buddhist Studies and is ideally suited for GTU consortial students. [No prior Buddhist studies required; Auditors with faculty permission]

RITUAL/PRACTICE/CRMNY BUDDHISM (HR-1570)

Credits:3

RITUAL, PRACTICE AND CEREMONY IN BUDDHISM This course examines ritual and practice in the Buddhist tradition. Topics will include the relationship between practice, doctrine, and ritual, ritual architecture, and historical and modern examples of ritual practice. Offered every other semester. Course format: Lecture. Evaluation: Written report and field trip.

INTRO THERAVADA BUDDHIST TRAD (HR-1596)

Credits:3

This course will survey the traditions of Buddhism commonly referred to as Theravada, with reference to their doctrine, development, and concrete localizations throughout South and Southeast Asia, as well as the contemporary West. We will also interrogate the shifting representations of these traditions that emerge in their interface with modernity. The course will incorporate both foundational primary texts and representative secondary scholarship in an attempt to broadly chart the living and historical dimensions of these traditions and the terms of their contemporary study. Seminar with discussion and lectures. Final paper and class field trip to a local temple required. Some knowledge of Buddhism helpful but not required. [15 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

READINGS EARLY BUDDHIST TEXTS: (HR-1615)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Diana Clark and Gil Fronsdal. The Collected Discourses of the Buddha (Samyutta Nikaya) is a magnificent anthology focused on the deeper wisdom and insights the Buddha emphasized on the path to awakening. The anthology is organized into thematic chapters which provide multiple perspectives and different approaches to the teachings. Themes include meditation practices, mediation states, and factors needed for awakening. The Collected Discourses also has a large collection of fascinating poems composed as conversations between deities and the Buddha. For this course we will choose a number of themes to explore and discuss in a manner that provides knowledge of early Theravada Buddhist teachings, a greater ability to think critically about these teachings, and support for one’s own spiritual practice. No prerequisites. Course format: seminar/lecture/discussion. Method of Evaluation: class participation, reflection papers and final paper. Intended audience: MA/MDiv/MTS students, DMin/PhD/ThD students with additional requirements.

METHODS IN STUDY OF BUDDHISM (HR-1630)

Credits:3

A survey of different approaches to the study of Buddhism, including textual, anthropological, sociological, historical, and bibliographic. Particular attention will be given to contemporary critical studies, appropriate historical and social contextualization of doctrinal claims, and relations between Buddhism and other religions in the modern world. Seminar format: students present summaries of readings and lead discussions; also presentation of own research plan. Grading: presentations and term paper, usually in the form of an MA thesis proposal. May be upgraded for doctoral students. [Auditors with Faculty permission]

INTRODUCTION TO ISLAM (HR-1902)

Credits:3

This course aims to introduce students to the Islamic tradition in its theological, legal, historical, and contemporary contexts, with a focus on faith and practice.

MEDITATIONS IN THERAVADA TRADN (HR-2990)

Credits:3

In this course we will explore, discuss and practice mindfulness, loving-kindness, compassion and concentration meditation. The exploration will include how these practices are taught and applied today as well as the ancient Theravada Buddhist context from which they arose. No prerequisites. Course format: seminar/lecture/discussion. Method of Evaluation: class participation, reflection papers and final paper. Intended audience: MA/MDiv/MTS students, DMin/PhD/ThD students with additional requirements.

ZEN BUDDHISM (HR-3040)

Credits:3

This is an introductory course aimed at developing a sound basic understanding of Zen Buddhist meditation practices and the teachings they express. We will study teachings on the Soto Zen practice of shikantaza "just sitting" as well as koan practice in both Soto and Rinzai traditions and Zen practice as it occurs in ritual, ordinary activities such a cooking, and in community. We will also consider Zen meditation practice as it relates to fundamental Buddhist teachings and practices. Participation in meditation practice as well as at least one visit to a local Zen temple are required. There are no prerequisites for this class. [20 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

ASIAN/OCEANIC CLTRL/FTH TRDTNS (HR-4175)

Credits:3

This seminar course addresses the complexities and heterogeneity of the cultures and faith traditions of Asia and Oceania. Students will learn the beliefs and practices of religious others with deeper theological understanding, critique, and cultural sensitivity. The course objectives are set to prepare students for ministry across cultural contexts, within and among Asian and Oceanic communities The classes will be taught by a team of GTU scholars of religion from various traditions. Some class sessions will be conducted as immersion experiences to different ethno-religious communities and cross-cultural/interfaith settings in the San Francisco Bay area. Students must attend and participate in ALL classes and field trips. [15 max enrollment]

READINGS IN MAHAYANA TEXTS (HR-8317)

Credits:3

Subtitle: The Lotus Sutra and Zen Views This online course will feature textual study of selected chapters from the Lotus Sutra, a central scripture in East Asian Buddhism, with commentaries and references from Zen teachers. Through colorful parables and shifting visionary viewpoints, the Lotus Sutra elaborates and expresses such key East Asian Buddhist themes as the subtle workings of skillful means; the Diversity of spiritual needs and approaches and their unity in the One Vehicle; the mystical pervasion of awakening beings in both space and time; and the centrality of faith to Buddhist awakening. In addition to examining the meaning of the Sutra's techings and their irrelevance to modern spiritual concerns, we will also consider the Sutra's widespread influence on East Asian culture, and the role of the Lotus Sutra in Japanese Zen and other East Asian traditions. [Some introductory course in Buddhism, including the Mahayana; 15 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

GLOBAL RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS (HR-8401)

Credits:3

This course will examine the major global religions from a cross-cultural, multi-religious perspective. Taking into consideration that a course that explores many religions cannot be comprehensive, we will consider the religions from a thematic perspective by analyzing fundamental beliefs and practices in the various religious traditions. In addition, we will also examine assumptions underlying the discipline of religious studies. Students will engage through weekly readings and forum discussion, as well as other interactive learning activities, as part of the online learning community. Students of all faiths and backgrounds are invited and encouraged to enroll. Priority given to low residency SKSM students. MDiv, MA/MTS, DMin. Relates to SKSM Threshold 3 & 4 and MFC Comps: 1 & 3. [20 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

RESEARCH SANSKRIT (HRBS-4050)

Credits:3

Knowledge of Sanskrit is important for students interested in deepening their understanding of Dharma traditionsand their philosophical, theological, literary and aesthetic textual cultures. Sanskrit has both ancient and classical roots and manifestations- from the ?g Veda (c. 1500 BCE) to the Grammarians, Upani?ads, (philosophy), the Epics, Bhakti , Yoga (theological), Poetics, and Tantric (esoteric) literary productions. This course will provide intermediate to advanced lessons in Sanskrit grammar, language and working vocabulary, enabling students to manage aspects of Sanskrit philology. While learning grammar in all its complexities, student will also read passages from certain primary texts. Two basic textbooks will be utilized in the study (including Madhav Desphpande's Sa?sk?ta-Subodhini ). Assessment will be via regular weekly exercises, tests papers and a final take-home exam. The course is open to MA, MDiv, and PhD candidates.

INTRO TO QURANIC STUDIES (HRBS-4822)

Credits:3

This introductory course in Quranic Studies focuses on the shorter hymnic suras (chapters) of the Quran. In addition, students are exposed to passages related to themes of religious freedom and pluralism. Students learn traditional Islamic and contemporary western academic skills for reading the Quran, including structural and literary analyses and they write essays on selected suras and passages applying the methods that they learn in class. The course provides a safe learning environment in which diversity of perspectives is encouraged and differences of opinion respected. Students must contact the instructor via e-email prior to enrolling in order to receive permission to register. Registration is contingent upon faculty approval. Students may take the course for 1.5 or 3.0 credits for partial or full completion of course assignments as instructed. Doctoral students may take the course for an added assignment of a 5000 word research essay. Relates to SKSM Threshold 3 and MFC Comp 3. This online course is synchronous on Zoom and counts as low residency.

QURAN: FEMINIST READINGS (HRBS-8420)

Credits:3

This synchronous online course will be conducted via zoom and Moodle platforms. It will examine the worldview, language, narratives and teachings of the Quran to begin to understand the implications of the Quranic texts on the lives of women, on gender construction and gender relations. In the process we shall examine feminist writings on the Quran or on issues pertaining to Muslim and the Quran. The course will involve an extensive and intensive critical engagement with the texts. Students will submit weekly assignments 24 hours before the course meeting time and their questions and observations from their weekly journals will help the instructor frame the weekly class lecture and discussion. The insights of historical-critical method, form criticism, modernist interpretations and sufi praxis will inform our deliberations. Students will be expected to come to class having an introductory level knowledge of Quranic studies otherwise they will need to do some extra reading as indicated in the course syllabus. Students will be evaluated based on their weekly assignments, class attendance and participation and a final essay. The final essay for Phd students will be at least 5000 words long. This course is suitable for any graduate student with some preliminary knowledge of the Quran and an interest in feminist issues. The first class shall meet on Monday from 6:10 - 9 pm. At that time students will have the option of changing the class time through a poll. If no alternative suitable time is found at which the entire registered student body can meet then we shall continue to meet on Monday evenings from 6:10-9 pm. Relates to SKSM Thresholds: Sacred Text and Interpretation, History of Dissenting Traditions and the Thea/ological Quest, Life in Religious Community and Interfaith Engagement and MFC Comps: Serves the larger UU Faith [Faculty Consent required]

WOMEN & THELEMA: A CASE STUDY (HRCE-2400)

Credits:3

Women & Thelema: A Case Study is proposed as an introductory, 2000-level seminar in the fields of Cultural & Historical Studies of Religion (HR) and Ethics & Social Theory (CE). It is intended for MA, MDiv, MTS, or MST students or students, especially those pursuing a Certificate in Sexuality and Religion whose academic research or pastoral service interests would benefit from a thorough grounding in feminist and queer theory and its practical application, especially (but not limited to) the study of neopagan new religious movements. This is a lecture/seminar style class that will also involve observer/participant fieldwork. Evaluation will be based on class participation, fieldwork journals, an in-class presentation on a theorist of choise, close readings of text, and a final project and presentation. This course is taught by GTU PhD student Carrie Sealine with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of James Lawrence.

ISSUES IN BUDDHIST MINISTRY: (HRCE-3014)

Credits:3

Explore the difficulties and direction in Buddhist Ministry within the Western context. Also, through a person-centered educational process, explore ways and means to develop one's personal ministry for the west. To study and evaluate an educational process will be the core element of the course. Lecture/seminar with research papers which include personal reflection documents within the words of the Buddhist teachers. Course is for MA students with an emphasis on ministry and chaplaincy.

RELIGIONLESS CHRISTIANITY (HRCE-4040)

Credits:3

We will study the growth of intellectual and popular movements in the recent past that reconceived Christianity as “religionless,” as a counter-religion, or as a form of subjectivity that stands beyond religion. We will examine the place of “religionless Christianity in Transcendentalism and liberal Protestantism in the nineteenth century; dialectical theology, existentialism, and the “death of God” movements in the twentieth century; and “Christian emergence” in recent times. We will trace the sources of “religionless Christianity” to late Enlightenment and Romantic philosophy, hermeneutics, phenomenology. We will take special interest in the growth of non-dogmatic and anti-dogmatic approaches to theology, and the relationship of “religionless Christianity” to secularization, the rise of modern science, colonialization, hermeneutics, phenomenology, liberal Protestantism, neo-Orthodoxy, ecumenism, and "death of God" theologies. Figures studied will include the 19th-century Lutheran theologians Richard Rothe and Albrecht Ritschl; the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche; the historian of religion Ernst Troeltsch; the Sikh-Anglican mendicant Sadhu Sundar Singh; the Catholic adapter of Hindu monasticism Bede Griffith; the dialectical theologians Karl Barth, Paul Tillich, and Dietrich Bonhoeffer; the American theologian Gabriel Vahanian, the Anglican theologian J.A.T. Robinson; and the philosophical theologians Mary-Jane Rubinstein and Philip Clayton. Seminar format: reading, writing, vigorous discussion, final research paper on an original topic related to the course. [12 max enrollment]

HISTORY OF IDEAS - HINDU STUDIES (HRCE-4200)

Credits:3

This course is based in the field of History of Ideas. The range of topics that we explore will be drawn from classical, medieval, and modern themes that occur across Hindu thought, traditions, texts, theologies, art and visual culture, literature, psychology, and other categories. We will examine the unique contributions of Hindu Traditions to the greater good and to human wellbeing. Major texts and lineages of thought on ethics, morals, law, and practice will be examined and major thinkers emphasized. Students will be able to choose the topics on which they wish to focus their semester's research and assignments. The course is appropriate for MA, MDiv, MTS, and doctoral students (ThD and PhD will be expected to do additional research).

JEWISH LIBERATION THEOLOGY (HRFT-4210)

Credits:3

The full title of this course is On Constructing a Jewish Liberation Theology and Theological Praxis: Indigeneity, (Anti)-Zionism and Diaspora and is offered as part of Starr King’s Hilda Mason Fellowship. In this course, through the use of scholarly writing, news sources, opinion and blog pieces, multimedia, Jewish liturgy, Torah (Hebrew Bible), Talmud (Rabbinical exegesis), and Midrash (rabbinical commentary and interpretation) we will collectively strive to answer the question: In an era of relative Jewish nationalist power and self-determination, what is a Jewish liberation theology and theological praxis that engenders liberation of both self and other? And what does it even mean to pursue a liberation theology or theological praxis, both squarely Christian constructs, within a Jewish context? In order to answer this question, we must start at the beginning and trace the roots of Jewish theological, halakhic (legal) and communal formation and subsequent galut (exile or diaspora) in an attempt to understand Judaism’s relationship to divinity as well as ritual and ethical practices that breed liberatory possibility for not just the Chosen people. This will include discussions of Jewish relationships to indigeneity, Zionism, ethnicity, race, diaspora, culture, secularism, intellectual inquiry and liturgical and ethical practice. This course is a 3-unit seminary-style interactive course. It is offered high-residency. Evaluations will be based participation in class discussions, two small projects throughout the course of the semester as well as one culminating final project. This course is open to all, especially those looking to explore the intersection of religious practice and liberatory social change. You do not need to be Jewish or have any background in Jewish studies to take this course. All course participants are encouraged to e-mail the instructor at farynborella@gmail.com before enrolling saying why you are interested in taking this course and your current relationship to Judaism. This course relates to the SKSM thresholds 2- Prophetic Witness and Work, 4- History of Dissenting Traditions and 4- Thea/ological Quest and Thea/ology in Culture and Context and MFC Comps. [20 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

TEACHING THE DIFFICULT PAST (HRHS-0003)

Credits:0

In this course we will attempt to understand how teachers and young people make sense of difficult historical episodes. Here, we consider the role that history education plays in creating imagined communities (Anderson, 1991), invisible ties (Zerubavel, 1996), collective memories (Halbwachs, 1932) and invented traditions (Hobsbawn, 1992). Over the course of 14 weeks we will unpack two global case studies: The Holocaust in Poland, and Slavery in the United States. Within each case, we will use our theoretical foundations to analyze primary artifacts such as textbook narratives, films, and plays. We will bolster this analysis with research articles and historical texts that illuminate the debates that swirl around these events. The course will end with a review of extant pedagogy for teachers attempting to bring education about difficult histories into their classrooms and the challenges they face. Course meets Thursdays 2:10pm-5pm in a location TBD.

JEWISH MYSTICISM (HRHS-0004)

Credits:0

This course will examine the ideas, narratives, theologies and practices that have been part of Jewish mysticism throughout the ages. We will proceed chronologically and thematically, exploring the variety of Jewish mystical trends as well as themes such as language, hermeneutics, gender, sexual imagery, nomian and anti-nomian aspects, messianism, symbolism and practices. We will consider the relationship between Jewish mysticism and surrounding religious systems as well as relationships between Jewish mysticism and other Jewish communal and rabbinic structures. Doctoral level seminar; at least year of Jewish studies required. Weekly Response Papers/Final Paper.

MORMONISM A NEW WORLD RELIGION (HRHS-1850)

Credits:3

Mormonism, or the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, is a distinctly American religion that also claims to be the restoration of original Christianity. Since its organization in 1830, it has grown from six members to world-wide population of over 15 millions with congregations in more than 180 countries and territories. Mormonism is a decidedly Christian religion but has distinctive doctrines on the Trinity, the preexistence of souls, the purpose of life, and the post-mortal world, including unique readings about heaven and hell. Mormons believe in modern prophets, continuing revelation, and additional sacred texts besides the bible, including the Book of Mormon which contains an account of Christ's visit to ancient America. In temples that dot the globe Mormons marry for eternity and perform other sacred ordinances. This course examines the origins, history, and evolution of Mormonism, including the religious and cultural context out of which it emerged, the foundational visions and experiences of its first prophets, and its reflection of the stresses and strains within the dominant Course meets at LDS Institute of Religion Building, 2368 LeConte Avenue.

HISTORY OF PURE LAND:7 MASTERS (HRHS-3250)

Credits:3

SEVEN MASTERS OF JODO SHINSHU This course is co-taught by Harry Bridge and Kiyonobu Kuwahara. The Shin Buddhist tradition traces its origins to the works of Nagarjuna, Vasubandhu, T'an-luan, Tao-ch'o, Shan-tao, Genshin, and Honen. This course examines their contributions to the development of Shin Buddhism. Required of ministerial aspirants. Format: Lecture. Evaluation: Final examination. [HRPH 1614 Introduction to Shin Buddhist Thought recommended as background]

TEACHING THE DIFFICULT PAST (HRHS-3750)

Credits:3

In this course we will attempt to understand how teachers and young people make sense of difficult historical episodes. Here, we consider the role that history education plays in creating imagined communities (Anderson, 1991), invisible ties (Zerubavel, 1996), collective memories (Halbwachs, 1932) and invented traditions (Hobsbawn, 1992). Over the course of 14 weeks we will unpack two global case studies: The Holocaust in Poland, and Slavery in the United States. Within each case, we will use our theoretical foundations to analyze primary artifacts such as textbook narratives, films, and plays. We will bolster this analysis with research articles and historical texts that illuminate the debates that swirl around these events. The course will end with a review of extant pedagogy for teachers attempting to bring education about difficult histories into their classrooms and the challenges they face.

JEWISH MYSTICISM (HRHS-4351)

Credits:3

This course will examine the ideas, narratives, theologies and practices that have been part of Jewish mysticism throughout the ages. We will proceed chronologically and thematically, exploring the variety of Jewish mystical trends as well as themes such as language, hermeneutics, gender, sexual imagery, nomian and anti-nomian aspects, messianism, symbolism and practices. We will consider the relationship between Jewish mysticism and surrounding religious systems as well as relationships between Jewish mysticism and other Jewish communal and rabbinic structures. Doctoral level seminar; at least year of Jewish studies required. Weekly Response Papers/Final Paper.

TPCS IN BUDDHISM IN THE WEST (HRHS-5526)

Credits:3

CRITICAL RACE THEORY AND AMERICAN BUDDHISM In this advanced seminar, we will explore the intersection of race and religion through critical race theory and American Buddhism. The first half of the semester will focus critical race theory, its central tenets and critiques; racial formation; and Asian American and immigration studies. This will provide a foundation for the later half of the semester which will explore these themes in the history, study, and practice of American Buddhism from its origins as an immigrant religion, its popularization within white spaces, media representations, and academic Buddhist Studies. Specialized topic related to the introduction of Buddhist thought and practice is selected by instructor. Course may be repeated for credit, if topic is different. [Prior coursework in Buddhist Studies required or instructor's permission]

BUDDHIST TRDTNS OF SOUTH ASIA (HRHS-8151)

Credits:3

Introduces the Buddhist traditions as they originate in India and develop throughout south and southeast Asia. First half of the required year long introductory survey of the entire Buddhist tradition. Lecture/seminar. Requirements:1 research paper; 1 reflection paper; class presentation. Required course for: M.A. (Buddhist Studies), M.B.S, M.Div., Buddhist Chaplaincy Certificate Program, Kyoshi Cetificate. NOTE: This course is co-sponsored by SKSM.

BUDDHIST TRDTNS OF EAST ASIA (HRHS-8152)

Credits:3

Introduces the Buddhist traditions transmitted to East Asia and the development of new traditions. Second half of the required year long introductory survey of the entire Buddhist tradition. Lecture/seminar. Requirements:1 research paper; 1 reflection paper; class presentation. Required course for: MA (Buddhist Studies), MBS, MDiv, Buddhist Chaplaincy Certificate Program, Kyoshi Certificate.

HSTRY OF SHIN BUDDHIST TRDTN (HRHS-8307)

Credits:3

HISTORY OF THE SHIN BUDDHIST TRADITION: PREMODERN A survey of themes and problems in the history of Jodoshinshu Buddhism, from Honen into the Tokugawa period, including doctrine but also other associated issues (institutionalization, women's roles, evolution of teachings, interaction with political and economic regimes, etc.). Online course, with readings and written interactions among students and instructor. Evaluation based on weekly student writings and a final paper. Primary aim is to establish basic knowledge, which may serve as foundation for subsequent studies. For all students concerned with Shin Buddhism's interaction with Japanese history, but assumes some general familiarity with Buddhist traditions.

SEX & SIN (HRHS-8335)

Credits:3

Sex & Sin in Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity Sex & Sin in Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity This course will introduce ways in which sex was used as a proposed boundary marker for religious identity in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian texts. Contextualizing these boundary markers in the cultural, religious, and political landscape of the Greco-Roman Mediterranean destabilizes the meta-narrative concerning the picture of ‘proper’ sexual ethics and gender identity by exposing the permeability of those boundaries. We will explore how Jewish and Christian pseudepigraphal and apocryphal texts from the third century BCE to the third century CE can offer alternative access points into Jewish and Christian tradition that offer a diverse set of voices that can be used to subvert oppressive interpretations that have had lasting and painful repercussions in lived gender experience because of the conflation of sex and sexuality with sin. Topics such as religious leadership, ritual participation (initiations, foundation narratives & practice), sin, violence & rape, the afterlife, fertility & abortion, and sexuality in the Greco-Roman world will be surveyed and discussed in light of current debates on women’s ordination, reproductive rights, and LGBTQI identity to track how ancient debates are alive today and consider how silenced voices from this period may be used as counter-oppressive lenses for Biblical and extra-Biblical interpretation. This course is online synchronous with Zoom meeting on Mondays 9:40-11am PST. The format is lecture/discussion. Lectures will be pre-recorded and Zoom sessions will be primarily for group discussion of the lecture and the readings concluding with supplemental lecture based on the direction of questions if needed. SKSM Thresholds: 3) Sacred Text and Interpretation and 4)History of Dissenting Traditions and Thea/ological Quest. [15 max enrollment]

INTRO TO SHIN BUDDHIST THOUGHT (HRPH-1614)

Credits:3

This course presents a survey of the fundamental aspects of the Shin Buddhist tradition, its history, textual sources, customs and thought. It also features discussions of Shin religious life, focusing on issues of practice, the mind, rituals, iconography and community. This course fulfills a requirement for the following IBS programs: Master of Arts (Buddhist Studies Concentration), Master of Buddhist Studies, Master of Divinity, and Kyoshi Certificate Program. [Faculty Consent required]

WESTERN ESOTERICISM RETHOUGHT (HRPH-3550)

Credits:3

We will re-examine the concept of the "Western Esoteric Tradition" from a historical-critical perspective, through a survey of texts both ancient and modern. There will be a weekly seminar with assigned readings and a final research paper.

TOPICS IN BUDDHIST PRACTICE (HRPH-4558)

Credits:3

This course will examine ritual practice in Mahayana Buddhism, focusing on Buddhist traditions in East Asia. Topics to be addressed include ordination, precept and funeral ceremonies, rituals for the state, repentance practices, devotional ritual practice, anti-ritual discourse, ritual dimensions of monastic life, ritualized approaches to meditation practice, esoteric ritual practice and healing rituals.

WORKS OF SHINRAN I (HRPH-4566)

Credits:3

A close examination of all of the shorter works of Shinran (1173-1263), the founder of Jodo Shinshu. Each of the works will be read in English translation to support the study of original texts. Important Japanese and Chinese terms in the original texts will also be considered. This course is required for ministerial students in any degree program. For students in the Master of Arts (Buddhist Studies Concentration) program, it will fulfill the distribution requirement for Area I. Kyoshi certificate students may fulfill one of the program's courses by completing this course. [Faculty Consent required; Auditors with faculty permission]

WORKS OF SHINRAN II (HRPH-4567)

Credits:3

A close examination of The True Teaching, Practice, and Realization of the Pure Land Way (Kyogyoshinsho) of Shinran (1173-1263), the major work of the founder of Jodo Shinshu. Reading materials will be in English to support the study of original text. Important Japanese and Chinese terms in the original texts will also be considered. This course is required for ministerial students in any degree program. For students in the Master of Arts (Buddhist Studies Concentration) program, it will fulfill the distribution requirement for Area I. Kyoshi certificate students may fulfill one of the program's courses by completing this course. [Faculty Consent required]

PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS BUDDHISM (HRPS-8320)

Credits:3

Psychological Aspects of Buddhism I: Foundations in Buddhist Psychological Thought: An examination of the development of psychological theories in the abhidharma, Yogacara and tathagatagarbha systems of thought, particularly through the reading of primary sources in translation. Where appropriate, comparison with Western psychological theories will also be considered. Course is offered online in a directed readings format--student read and write brief reflections weekly. Grading: reflection papers and term paper, topic to be decided in consultation with instructor. May be repeated for credit when different primary texts are being studied. May be upgraded for doctoral students. [Auditors excluded]

The Sabbath (HRPT-2050)

Credits:3

This course will cover the origins and historical development of the Sabbath from the Bible until the present day. We will read religious sources on the meaning and observance of the Sabbath, study the phenomenology of the Sabbath experience, and analyze the role of the Sabbath in shaping Jewish literature, thought, and culture. Readings include selections from the Talmud, Maimonides, liturgy, Abraham Joshua Heschel, and modern poetry and short stories. Students are also expected to participate in a Sabbath service or meal during the Sabbath between the two weeks of the class and reflect on their experience. Students will write one brief reflection paper and a longer research paper. This satisfies the Interfaith elective requirement for MDiv students.

SACRED SOUND IN WORLD RELIGIONS (HRRA-2500)

Credits:3

Fundamental to this course is an attempt to respond to the question: What is “sacred sound”? We will explore the meanings and motions, the feelings, vibrations and experiences of life, love, longing, and lament in and across the vast inner landscape of world religion. We will listen, create, and immerse ourselves in sacred sound, vibration, silence, music and chant within five world religions: Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam and Judaism. Our phenomenological approach will attempt to understand the meanings, significance and experiences of sacred sound to those within the tradition (emic), and to reflect on what we see and hear from without (etic), noting observations, feelings, and sensations, raising questions, making connections, and affirming differences. Our primary mode for study is sound immersion: incorporating silence, attentive listening, breath practice, vocal and instrumental sound, ritual, chanting, lecture/dialogue, primary source readings, journal articles, class presentations, videos, recordings, and visiting lecturers/performances from scholar/performers within the traditions. Grading is based upon attendance/participation, reading of class assignments, one short in-class presentation/reflection, six brief reflection papers, and one longer, end-of-term paper comparing two world religions in their respective approaches to sacred sound, specifically focused on a particular sound expression/experience/text in each.

ISLAMIC ART (HRRA-3945)

Credits:3

This is a three credit hour lecture course on Islamic visual culture. The geographic span of the class will be wide—from the Arabian Peninsula and the Middle East to North Africa and Western Europe. We will study some of the quintessential architectural monuments associated with medieval Islam. We will consider city planning, palatial structures and gardens but will mostly concentrate on religious architecture. We will further focus on the importance of calligraphy in Quran manuscripts and architectural inscriptions, on figural representations in secular buildings and books, as well as on images in ceramics and metalwork. An additional emphasis will be placed on the interactions between various cultures and especially on the ways Islamic visual idioms were utilized by the medieval Christians and vice versa. The grades will be based on: 1) your active involvement in class discussion, 2) one oral presentation, 3) weekly reflection papers, 4) a book review and 5) a final 10 to 15 page paper.

SPIRIT MADE FLESH (HRRS-2900)

Credits:3

This class will explore ways of strengthening and nurturing families at home, in congregations, and in the community through spiritual practice and care. Practices will include family rituals, sabbath time, prayer, meditation, community service, mindfulness, play, mealtimes, activism, devotion, creativity, nature, and gratitude. Families of all kinds, across the generations, and from different cultural and faith traditions - including students' own families - will receive our attention. Course Format: Classroom discussion. Method of Evaluation: weekly reflections, spiritual practice exercises, and projects. Intended audience (M.Div., MASC, MA). This online course is asynchronous. Low residency. Relates to Threshold #: 5; 7; and 8 MFC Competencies #: 2; 3; and 6 [25 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

HISTORY & CULTURE SEMINAR (HRRS-6000)

Credits:3

THEORIES AND METHODS IN THE STUDY OF RELIGION The aim of this course is to familiarize students with the range of theoretical and methodological approaches in the historical and cultural studies of religion, especially those employed by current faculty in the department. Students will have the opportunity to formulate their own methodological approaches and theoretical frameworks of analysis. In the final weeks of the semester students will present their research in the context of a class conference. Students are required to write a 20-25 page paper that includes an extended discussion of methodology. The course is required for GTU doctoral students in Historical and Cultural Studies of Religion and open to doctoral students in other departments. Course meets in the Collaborative Learning Space at the GTU Library.

ISLAM AND CRITICAL THEORY (HRRS-6050)

Credits:3

Midful Walk Transylvania (HRSP-2100)

Credits:3

THEOLOGICAL LITERACY (HRST-1101)

Credits:1.5

For joint-program students participating in Chaplaincy Institute (ChI) modules as part of the Interfaith Studies Certificate. Theology literally means “words about the Divine.” In Theological Literacy, students will explore the concepts that attempt to describe the Divine, as well as how we understand the universe and ourselves in relation to the Divine. Our approach to ministry is always directed by our theology. In this course, students will receive an interfaith orientation to theological concepts across the World Religions, to better discern, define and describe one’s own understanding of theological questions related to morality and end-of-life speculation. The ChI curriculum incorporates lecture, dyad/small group work, various art modalities, and site visits to deepen our many ways of learning and integrating new awareness. This course is only for students who have been admitted to the SKSM-ChI joint program and is not available to other SKSM students or to students from other GTU schools. This course does not count toward residency requirements. Meets May 13-15 + additional online coursework. Relevant for SKSM thresholds 1 and 6, MFC competency 3. [10 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

CHRISTIAN-MUSLIM DIALOGUE: (HRST-2083)

Credits:3

This is a seminar course exploring important elements and critical issues of dialogue. The study will include an examination of theories supporting and challenging interreligious dialogue and learning. The special focus will draw from the history and development of Christian-Muslim relations. There will be a special focus on the recent development of “A Common Word” initiative begun in 2007 (http://www.acommonword.com), the Roman Catholic Church’s response to this project and the Building Bridges Seminars organized by the Anglican Church in 2002. Comparative theology methodology and interfaith pedagogies provide a foundation for these explorations. Throughout the semester scholars from Christian, Jewish, and Muslim faith traditions will join us as “dialogue partners” and we will visit their places of worship and gathering. Two 8-10 page papers (mid-term and final), class presentations, book review, and essays based on the site visit to places of worship will be required. The course is intended for MA/MTS students. D.Min and PhD. are welcome but they must enroll for a course upgrade and complete a 20 page paper as their final paper. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

INTRODUCTION TO HINDUISM (HRST-2100)

Credits:3

This course will introduce Hinduism, the world's third largest faith with about a billion adherents, and a five-thousand year history in a way that is accessible to students who new to the Hindu faith but interested in a multi-disciplinary study of the Hindu world. We will journey through the diverse and colorful world of the Hindu experience of the sacred through art, music, literature, dance, and the sacred texts that give rise to these many expressions of Religious Life, with particular attention to principal concepts, ethics, and elements of praxis. The course will use extensive AV presentations and lecture & class discussion format. Field trips to local temples or museums may be included. Requirements include reflections on readings, and a seminar project. The course is appropriate for MDiv, MA/MTS (PhD/ThD students could take a similar course as an SRC with the instructor and would be expected to do alternate research at the appropriate level.)

COMPARATIVE THEOLOGY: HINDU-CHRISTIAN THEORIES AND APPLICATIONS (HRST-3000)

Credits:3

HINDU CHRISTIAN COMPARATIVE THEOLOGY: Theories and Applications While religious studies have had to reconsider comparative methodologies, they have started flourishing in Theology. Comparative theology as Francis X. Clooney describes it, incorporates a dialectical approach that seeks to hold both “comparative” and “theology” in creative tension. This interreligious approach juxtaposes specific texts, images, practices, doctrines, or even persons of two or more traditions, with the goal of helping the interlocutor’s “faith seek understanding,” while being rooted in a home tradition. The fruits, or insights of such a comparison are indebted to both the newly encountered tradition/s as well as the home tradition. This seminar course explores important comparative theological methods, sources, and philosophical frameworks that undergird this interreligious, dialogical venture. As such, it outlines themes and texts, theories, and theorists, while distinguishing it from comparative religions. Our typical unit for a comparative method will be a Hindu Christian theology. Recent socio-political and religious developments have led many to reflect on one’s position toward the religious ‘Other.’ This course will enable students to mark themselves or their religious perspectives in one or more of the theological and philosophical paradigms that will be discussed. This course will be at the intersection of Comparative Religions, Philosophy & Theology of Religions, and Interreligious studies due to their overlapping relationship with one another. This course is taught by PhD student Pravina Rodrigues with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Rita Sherma.

WOMEN, TANTRA, & THE GODDESS (HRST-4900)

Credits:3

One of the most popular areas of research in the academic study of Hinduism is Goddess Studies (Sakta Studies), particularly in terms of its relationship to women’s lives. The theological vision of the Divine Feminine was first put forth by a women sage/seer in canonical Rig Veda (circa 2000 BCE) in a hymn that is still important today. This course focuses on goddesses and women, and on power as feminine, in one of the oldest systematized traditions that supports women’s spiritual leadership. Sakta cosmology, ontology, narrative theology, and traditions of spiritual praxis have, according to current scholarship, led to women’s empowerment in historical and contemporary times. How does such a conception of the divine feminine function in various textual, historical, ritual, and social contexts? We will critically engage interdisciplinary methodologies to understand the implications of a powerful divine feminine in these milieus. The course will examine the varied constructions and conceptions of the gendered divine, and the sophisticated semiotics involved in Sakta-tantra praxis, which posits ‘identity with the divine’ (Sa aha?; brahmanasmi, etc.) as a central component of self-understanding and realization. We will use the doctrines and practices related to Feminine Deity in Buddhist Vajrayana, which shares many principles, practices, and approaches with Saktism, as our discursive partner in interreligious discourse on Sakta-tantra. This interdisciplinary course will use the methodologies of university disciplines such as Ritual Studies, Contemplative Studies, Postcolonial Studies, Women’s Studies, and academic Hindu and Buddhist Studies. This course is taught by PhD student Laura Dunn with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Rita Sherma.

SEXTING: SEX IN SACRED TEXTS (HRST-8200)

Credits:3

At the intersection of sex and sacred texts we often think of prohibitions, rules and regulations, and narratives of the origins of humanity. Yet, sacred texts offer a much expansive engagement with sexuality if we consider more broadly the ways in which sexuality operates in these writings. Using a literary approach, this course engages discourse about sexuality and writings that use the imagery of sexual expression in sacred texts of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, alongside extra-canonical and theological texts, as well as the texts of other religious and spiritual traditions, with a focus on the mystical and poetic. Focusing on deep engagement with a few texts, we will explore them as sources for liberating and complex sexual theologies beyond legalistic discourse. Grading will be based on a variety of written and creative projects, including tweets, blog posts, artistic expressions, and regular contributions to the course discussions on the class Moodle site. Designed for students in the Certificate in Sexuality and Religion, fulfilling the Area A requirement. Students in all degree and certificate programs are welcome.

INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIAN HISTORY (HS-1041)

Credits:3

This course provides an introductory overview of Christian history with a focus on important theological, spiritual, social, and ecclesiological issues as they were shaped and understood by the laity, institutional authorities, and a variety of religious leaders. Class format will include lectures and class discussions based on the reading and interpretation of primary and secondary texts. Requirements: online discussion forums; the writing of six analytical essays; several pop quizzes; and two take-home written exams. This is a basic survey course in the History of Christianity intended primarily for MDiv, MA, and MTS students. It satisfies the basic history requirement for PSR’s degree programs.

HISTORY I (HS-1080)

Credits:3

CHRISTIANITY FROM JEWISH SECT TO COLONIAL CHURCHES This course is an introduction to the history of Christianity and historical theology from the second to the seventeenth centuries. During this time, Christianity developed the main features of what is today the world's largest religion. Along the way, Christianity was transformed again and again as it adapted to vastly different, changing cultural and social environments. This course is about Christianity in the real world. You will learn how to study the origins and development of beliefs and practices, but you will also study much more. The course will introduce you to the continuities and varieties of Christian experience and belief in different times and places, from the Roman Empire to Persia, China, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and you will be introduced to the complexity of Christianity's social, cultural, and political entanglements in all these places. The course will help you learn to break down real life situations and understand the fine points at which religious innovation and change occur, even when people try to resist change or return to the past. Audio files of weekly lectures, illustrated with slides, and videos are provided for each week. Readings from primary sources in translation are indicated on the course schedule. The readings will illustrate history, but more importantly, they will give you the opportunity to develop basic skills in assessing and evaluating the belief and behavior of religious communities in the real world. Weekly exercises will ask you to apply analytical skills, draw conclusions, and communicate them to your peers. You will be introduced to the history of the interpretation of the bible on the example of commentaries on the first day of creation in Genesis 1. You will learn about the historical entanglement of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. You will read and study several theological and mystical classics. You will be exposed to the politics, ideas, and actions that gave rise to Protestantism and the intimate relationship of Protestant and Catholic reforms. You will discover the birth of the tension between theology and natural science. Finally, you will be encouraged to apply the critical skills and aptitudes you are developing in your study of the past to situations of religious life, leadership, and service today.

HISTORY II (HS-1081)

Credits:3

CHRISTIANITY FROM COLONIAL CHURCHES TO GLOBAL RELIGION This course is an introduction to the history of Christianity from the Sixteenth century to the present. During this time, Christianity became the largest religion in the world. Along the way, it was transformed again and again as it adapted to vastly different, changing cultural, social, and political environments. Topics will include the roles of Christian churches in European colonialism, the impact of expanding cultural networks across the globe on religious knowledge, cultural hybridization; Christianity and the rise of nation-states; the conflict of religion and science; the role of Christianity in slavery and in anti-slavery, suffrage, fascist, and labor movements; the rise and fall of American denominations; and the competition of orthodox and pluralistic theologies. Lectures, readings in primary sources, discussions. Midterm and final examinations (term papers may be substituted).

HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY I (HS-1105)

Credits:3

History of the Church from the Apostolic Period until the end of the Middle Ages, focusing, in particular, on its transformation from a small Jewish sect into the international Church of the middle ages. Some attention will be paid to the development of doctrine, but more emphasis will be placed on piety and worship, dissent, missions, mysticism, ecclesiastical organization, and Church relations to secular government. The course will use a lecture / class discussion format. There will be two short papers and two in-class blue-book exams. This course is intended to beginning MA and MDiv students. [25 max enrollment]

CHURCH:MODERN TO CONTEMPORARY (HS-2195)

Credits:3

Church History, 1451-2013: a survey of the life and story of the Catholic Church from the fall of Constantinople to the first decade of the 21st century. While the intent is to trace the general trends and conditions that shaped the Church Catholic during 500 years, the opportunity is given students to investigate more localized events and traditions, noting where movement has taken place to renew the Church and re-launch the Gospel mission. HS2195 is primarily a survey course. FORMAT: Lectures, with some group work. Evaluation: Annotated bibilography, two book reviews, class presentation.

CHURCH TO 1400 (HS-2498)

Credits:3

This lecture/discussion course is an historical survey of Christianity from the 1st century CE to the 15th and the eve of Modernity. As surveys go, it's meant to lend an impression that lingers-one that informs broadly but also relies on occasionally closer scrutiny of select topics. The course is studiously multi-disciplinary, approaching major developments in the Christian churches from a variety of historical perspectives and original sources. Requirements include two short essays (5-7 pages): an analysis of one of our assigned original sources and a non-textual analysis--some work of art or architecture from the historical periods covered. Each student will present for discussion one of the original sources in the syllabus. Finally, students will participate in small group 'Pastoral Application Projects' which entail communicating historical material in particular pastoral settings.

CHURCH: 1400 TO PRESENT (HS-2776)

Credits:3

This lecture/discussion course is an historical survey of Christianity from the 15th century to the present. As surveys go, it’s meant to lend an impression that lingers—one that informs broadly but also relies on occasionally closer scrutiny of select topics. These topics include Christianity in the late medieval world, the Reformation, early Jesuit history, faith and the Enlightenment, missiology and the Church in the 20th century. The course is studiously multi-disciplinary, approaching major developments in the Christian churches from a variety of perspectives and historical sources.

THE OTHER IN CHRISTIAN HISTORY (HS-4575)

Credits:3

Historical exploration of Western Christian attitudes toward outsiders and aliens from the early Christian era through the early 21st century. Consideration will be given first to theoretical issues involved in the study of “the other” in Christian history, and topics treated will include pagans, heretics, witches, Jews, Muslims, foreigners, immigrants, homosexuals, and members of "minority" groups. Seminar format; two analytical essays; one research paper and two (2) in-class presentations. Intended for MDiv, MA and PhD/ThD students. [Faculty Consent required; 12 max enrollment]

SWEDENBORG IN HISTORY (HS-4701)

Credits:3

This course will substantially engage with one strand of Swedenborg's thought in cultural history: the ways his particular conceptualizations of mind, body, and soul impacted various alternative medicine currents in the 19th century, largely within an American context. We will begin by situating Swedenborg's work as a scientist and visionary theologian within different interpretative frameworks, from western esotericism to wisdom literature, seeking to underscore the continuities between Swedenborg's science and religion. The majority of the course will then focus on various fields where his role as "visionary scientist or "scientific mystic" became amplified and transformed, from spiritualism and mesmerism, to osteopathy, to the emergence of the New Thought movement. By amplifying Swedenborg's presence within these esotericic healing currents, this course provides an overview on the contested relationship between mind and body in 19th century America. Oral presentation, final paper.

NEW RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS (HS-5022)

Credits:3

This seminar will introduce students to the research field of New Religious Movements and to the structure and content of the Doctoral Program in New Religious Movements at the GTU. It will initiate students to the techniques of research, introduce some methodologies appropriate to the field of New Religious Movements, survey broadly the two historical periods (nineteenth century alternative movements and twentieth-century alternative movements), and promote skills in organizing and writing. The seminar will be geared specifically to the needs and interests of doctoral students in New Religious Movements, but students from other fields and other programs are welcome. Informed classroom participation is 75% of the final grade, final research paper or pastoral project is 25%. [Auditors with Faculty Permission]

HISTORY I (HS-8010)

Credits:3

CHRISTIANITY FROM JEWISH SECT TO COLONIAL RELIGION. This course is an introduction to the history of Christianity and historical theology from the second to the seventeenth centuries. During this time, Christianity developed the main features of what is today the world's largest religion. Along the way, Christianity was transformed again and again as it adapted to vastly different, changing cultural and social environments. This course is about Christianity in the real world. You will learn how to study the origins and development of beliefs and practices, but you will also study much more. The course will introduce you to the continuities and varieties of Christian experience and belief in different times and places, from the Roman Empire to Persia, China, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and you will be introduced to the complexity of Christianity's social, cultural, and political entanglements in all these places. The course will help you learn to break down real life situations and understand the fine points at which religious innovation and change occur, even when people try to resist change or return to the past. Audio files of weekly lectures, illustrated with slides, and videos are provided for each week. Readings from primary sources in translation are indicated on the course schedule. The readings will illustrate history, but more importantly, they will give you the opportunity to develop basic skills in assessing and evaluating the belief and behavior of religious communities in the real world. Weekly asynchronous exercises will ask you to apply analytical skills, draw conclusions, and communicate them to your peers. The learning community will be reinforced by periodic web conferences. You will be introduced to the history of the interpretation of the bible on the example of commentaries on the first day of creation in Genesis 1. You will learn about the historical entanglement of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. You will read and study several theological and mystical classics. You will be exposed to the politics, ideas, and actions that gave rise to Protestantism and the intimate relationship of Protestant and Catholic reforms. You will discover the birth of the tension between theology and natural science. Finally, you will be encouraged to apply the critical skills and aptitudes you are developing in your study of the past to situations of religious life, leadership, and service today.

BAPTIST HISTORY & POLITY (HS-8020)

Credits:3

Beginning in Europe and tracing its development in America, this course will survey the history of the Baptist traditions. Attention will be given to prominent persons who helped shape the tradition as well as key social and theological issues that helped define Baptist over the years. This course is also presented as partial fulfillment of the regional polity requirement for ordination in the ABC/USA.

CHURCH HISTORY (HS-8200)

Credits:3

This course will survey the history of Christianity from its earliest beginnings up to the eve of the Reformation. Special attention will be given to prominent leaders who help shape Christian doctrine. Moreover, key theological, political and social issues will be addressed and primary texts will be used to enhance group discussion.

PATRISTIC-MEDIEVAL EXEGESIS (HSBS-4050)

Credits:3

The students of this seminar will read and discuss representative examples of Biblical Exegesis from the first century to the fourteenth century. Each meeting be topical. Students will prepare individual oral reports on their particular readings and give them during each session. After the reports, the rest of the time will be devoted to general discussion and comparison of the texts. The grading will be a 25 to 30 page research paper and the weekly individual oral presentations of approximately 20 minutes each. This course is intended for MA, MDiv, and doctoral students. Knowledge of Latin, Greek, and a modern language is useful but not required.[10 max enrollment]

UMC HISTORY/DOCTRINE/POLITY 1 (HSFT-2000)

Credits:3

This course is a study of Wesleyan theology-its concerns, texts, and doctrinal statements-and the history of the Methodist movement, from its inception in eighteenth-century Britain to its current embodiment in the United Methodist Church. The course will engage in close readings of John Wesley's texts and some of his contemporary interpreters alongside readings on the Book of Discipline of the UMC. This course is designed to fulfill one half of the credits required by the denomination for United Methodist history, doctrine, and polity. Assignments will include: careful reading of the assigned texts, weekly reflections posted on Moodle, two paper assignments, and a class presentation. [Faculty Consent required; 30 max enrollment]

UMC HISTORY/DOCTRINE/POLITY 2 (HSFT-2001)

Credits:3

This course explores the history of the Methodist movement in the context of the United States, from its formation to the formation of the United Methodist Church. Furthermore, the course studies the nature, structure and polity of the United Methodist Church as expressions of its Wesleyan theological roots. We will explore the Book of Discipline in order to understand the constitution, discipline, organization, and governance of United Methodism. Students will be equipped to lead United Methodist congregations as well as to assess the social principles of the denomination. This course is designed to fulfill one half of the credits required by the denomination for United Methodist history, doctrine, and polity. Assignments will include: readings of assigned texts, weekly reflections posted on Moodle, and a final exam.

UMC GENERAL CONFERENCE IMMERSION (HSFT-3000)

Credits:1.5

This course will immerse students in the special session of the General Conference of the United Methodist Church, held in St. Louis, MO, 2/23/2019-2/26/2019. This class will introduce students to the theological disputes around human sexuality and the controversy surrounding the current stance adopted by the United Methodist Book of Discipline, according to which “homosexuality” is “incompatible with Christian teaching” and the ban on ordination of “self-avowed practicing homosexuals.” Students in this immersion will have the unique chance to be present for this historic moment in the life of the United Methodist Church, participate in activities with seminarians from other United Methodist seminaries, and engage in the task of “conferencing,” a landmark process of discernment in the Wesleyan traditions. There will be two class meetings prior to the trip: 2/8/2019 8th and 2/15/2019. A final meeting will be on 3/1/2019.

UU PROPHETIC WITNESS (HSFT-4009)

Credits:3

This intensive course will explore the history of Unitarian Universalist Prophetic Witness since the Merger in 1961, as expressed in action and voted on by the annual Unitarian Universalist General Assembly. It will combine historical investigation of social justice actions and witness with deep analysis of Unitarian Universalist polity and how congregations transform affirmation into action. Students will trace the moral arc from 1961 issues like desegregation, disarmament, reproductive rights, migrant farm workers, House UnAmerican Activities and Capital Punishment to those of the present, including Islamophobia, gun control and Black Lives Matter. Required texts will be drawn from the Ministerial Fellowship Committee's reading list and will include The Arc of the Universe is Long, The Premise and the Promise, Prophetic Encounters, and Conrad Wright's Congregational Polity. Relates to SKSM Threshold 2 and MFC Comp 4 Intended Audience: MDiv, MA, MASC Evaluation Method: 1) class participation 2) oral presentations based on independent research 3) demonstrated preparation and 4) final paper or final project. Course meets daily, 1/14/19-1/19/19, from 9am-5pm at SKSM. [Eco intensive preferred; 30 max enrollment]

UU HISTORY (HSFT-8162)

Credits:3

This course begins with an examination of the (alleged) antecedents to Unitarianism and Universalism in pre-Reformation Europe. We begin with development of Unitarianism in Poland, Transylvania, and England, then on to that of North American Unitarianism through its classical age, the Transcendentalist development, and the various crises of identity and purpose that develop into and through the late 19th and 20th centuries. Then we turn our attention to Universalist ascendency, decline, and then consolidation with Unitarianism. Careful attention will be paid throughout to the Unitarian/Universalist social location in relationship to class, race, and gender identities, and how these sometimes enabled and sometimes impaired social justice advances. This course relates to MFC Competencies #6 and #7 and SKSM Thresholds #4. [30 max enrollment]

THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (HSFT-8200)

Credits:3

THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: DOMESTIC, FOREIGN, MISSIONARY The Episcopal Church is often understood as an establishment church originating in the American Revolution, with a few additional forays beyond an elite demographic. In this course, students will be asked to grasp The Episcopal Church as a living response to history of mission and empire, embedded in a larger global story of church, colonialism, and Christendom. Course readings will focus specifically on the ways in which TEC struggles with the weight of its history and polity as balanced with mission, justice, and inclusion, such as missions to Native Americans, the history of African American Episcopalians, the work of the DFMS both in the United States and overseas, and recent controversies over sexuality and the global Anglican Communion. Course evaluation through online participation, papers, and exams. Course level is intended for MDiv, CAS, MTS, and MA students; doctoral students welcome with additional requirements.

HISTORY OF RELIGION SEMINAR (HSHR-4800)

Credits:3

Topic Spring 2019: The Evolution of Religion. The seminar will examine religion as an element of cognitive and cultural evolution, and it will examine the implications of new insights from paleo-anthropology, neuro-psychology, and the history of hominids for the study of religion in traditional complex societies in past and present. The seminar will address questions such as these: when did religious belief emerge among hominids, what was its character, and what was its role in the cognitive evolution of homo sapiens? What do answers to these questions imply for the nature of religion at more recent stages of human life, and what do they imply for the study of theology? An international workshop on 12-13 April 2019 will examine “Touching Things in the Middle Ages,” bringing a group of scholars from the Center for the Comparative Study of Monasticism in Dresden, Germany, to meet with seminar members and scholars from Berkeley and Stanford. The workshop will provide a laboratory for seminar participants to explore the implications of recent work in human evolution and religion for our understanding of theology, ritual, emotion, politics, etc. in later time periods. Students will produce a final project/paper on a topic at the intersection of one’s particular interests and the material, cognitive, and evolutionary dimensions of religious belief and practice studied over the semester.

HELLENISTIC & ROMAN PHILOSOPHY (HSPH-4410)

Credits:3

Greek philosophy after Alexander the Great to Dionysios. We will examines where “philosophy” fit into the larger social, educational and religious structures of the Hellenistic world. Epicurean and Stoic alternatives to Aristotle and Plato. Middle and Neo-Platonism. Greek philosophy at Rome. Jewish and Christian use and adaptations of Greek philosophy. This course is designed for students doing advanced work in history, Hellenistic philosophy or patristics. [Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded]

GREENING SWEDENBORG (HSRA-3783)

Credits:3

This course examines Swedenborg's writings from a contemporary environmental perspective, looking for ways that his visionary theology might speak to pressing ecological concerns. We will start with a survey of selections from Swedenborg's theology, while glancing towards some of the earlier science to understand how Swedenborg took parts in 18th conversations around natural theology, Divine beauty, and the (organic) order of nature. Swedenborg's work will be approached thru various avenues of eco-theology (Rosemary Radford Ruether, Katherine Keller), ecological literary criticism (Timothy Morton), and the "vibrant materialism" of Jane Bennett. We conclude with considering the ways that Swedenborgian theology was read and received by environmental writers such as Ralph Waldo Emerson and Sarah Orne Jewett, and his contribution to the emergence of a modern environmental imaginary at the end of the 19th century. Reflection Papers, Oral Presentation, Final Research Paper/Project. Intended audience: advanced M.Div/M.A./MTS

RELIGIOUS FREEDOM: FOUNDATIONS (HSRS-8210)

Credits:3

For SKSM students only, conducted in cooperation with the Religious Freedom Center of the Freedom Forum Institute (http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/programs/religious-civic-leaders/). A blended learning course on the origins and development of religious liberty in the US from the colonial and founding periods to the mid-twentieth century. It offers a thorough understanding of the historical and legal foundations that currently govern the relationship of religion and government, define protection for the free exercise of religion, and provide the civic framework for living among people of all religions and none. Students must contact the instructor via e-email prior to enrolling in order to receive permission to register. Registration is contingent upon faculty approval and successful, separate application to the RFC by December 1. Online plus three day immersion at the RFC in Washington, DC. Travel expenses are the responsibility of the students. Instruction provided by RFC faculty, course administration by Christopher Schelin. Relates to SKSM Threshold 1 and 2 and MFC Comp 4, 5, and 7. [Faculty Consent required; 10 max enrollment]

US RELIGIOUS LIBERTY TODAY (HSRS-8211)

Credits:3

For SKSM students only. A blended course on the evolution of the First Amendment religious Freedom principles from the 1940s, through the civil rights era, to today. Participants will address contemporary issues that concern the constitutional relationship of religion and government along with current debates over the meaning of free exercise of religion. Students must contact the instructor via e-email prior to enrolling in order to receive permission to register. Registration is contingent upon faculty approval. Relates to SKSM Threshold 1 and 2 and MFC Comp 4, 5, and 7. Conducted in cooperation with the Religious Freedom Center of the Newseum, http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/admissions/areas-of-study/religious-civic-leaders/. Online during the Fall 2018 Semester (September-December) plus three day immersion at the RFC in Washington, DC. Travel expenses are the responsibility of the students. Separate application must be made to the RFC. Designed and administered by Lauren W. Herman of the RFC, supervised by Christopher Schelin (http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/contact/directory/?entry=23). [Faculty Consent required; 10 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

RELIGION AND NEWS MEDIA (HSRS-8220)

Credits:3

or SKSM students only, conducted in cooperation with the Religious Freedom Center of the Freedom Forum Institute (http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/programs/religious-civic-leaders/). This blended learning courses examines the challenges that the media present in communicating and engaging with belief within the context of the First Amendment and freedom of religion or belief. In order to be an effective and authoritative religious leader in a diverse democracy, lay and ordained leaders must cultivate multiple competencies and literacies. This course will help students expand religious, media and digital literacies. These competencies will be measured via multimedia engagement, key readings, videoconferences, Socratic seminars, analysis (case studies), and media production. Students must contact the instructor via e-email prior to enrolling in order to receive permission to register. Registration is contingent upon SKSM faculty approval and successful, separate application with the RFC by December 1. Online plus three day immersion at the RFC in Washington, DC. Travel expenses are the responsibility of the students. Instruction provided by RFC faculty, course administration by Christopher Schelin. Relates to SKSM Threshold 1 and 2 and MFC Comp 4, 5, and 7. [Faculty Consent required; 10 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

 (HSSP-2011)

Credits:0

MEDIEVAL MYSTICS (HSSP-4042)

Credits:3

The students of this seminar will read and discuss representative Christian mystics from the period 1000–1600. Each meeting will focus on a particular group of mystics. Students will prepare individual oral reports on their particular readings and give them during each session. After the reports the rest of the time will be devoted to general discussion and comparison of the texts. This course is for MA, MDiv, and doctoral students. Those who want to take the course at the 5000 level will be expected to use original language sources when writing their research papers. [10 max enrollment]

WESTERN ESOTERIC TRADITIONS (HSSP-4395)

Credits:3

A critical study of Western esoteric traditions from its origins in ancient Egypt and Greece, through its modern foundations in the Renaissance and Enlightenment and into contemporary expressions of continuing traditions and new religious movements. Manifesting in broad yet concrete historical contexts such as ancient Hermetism, Jewish and Christian kabbalah, Renaissance and Enlightenment theosophy, Masonic rites, Rosicrucianism, Jungism and New Age movements, the field is located especially in the history of ideas in specific ways of understanding cosmology, anthropology, and soteriology. Students will learn to identify the distinctive currents of thought around which the panorama of movements have cohered and will analyze the sociological, historical, and philosophical reasons for esotericism’s continuing appeal. Readings will include primary sources and secondary literature in every session, and students will become functionally familiar with the research methodologies of the field. Lecture/seminar, class presentations, final paper. MDiv, MA/MTS, DMin, PhD/ThD.

ANCIENT/MEDIEVAL JEWISH CVLZTN (HSST-0005)

Credits:0

Ancient Medieval Jewish Civilization This course will examine Jewish civilization from its beginnings in ancient Israel through its development in medieval times. We will examine features of Jewish communal life, as well as the intellectual and religious currents among Jews in the ancient and medieval periods. This course will provide an understanding of the continuities and discontinuities in Jewish history and the overall process of cultural change in Judaism. This course is required for all M.A. and Certificate students at CJS. Weekly response papers/Final Exam.

MODERN JEWISH INTELL& CULT TH (HSST-0007)

Credits:0

This course will investigate major themes in the intellectual and cultural history of the Jews from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries. It will take some of the key thinkers of this period as the lens through which to view cultural developments. The course will start with Shabbatai Zvi and Baruch Spinoza in the seventeenth century and Moses Mendelssohn and Israel Baal Shem Tov in the eighteenth. Other Jewish writers and thinkers we will study include Berthold Auerbach, Heinrich Graetz, Hermann Cohen, Emma Lazarus, Yehuda Leib Gordon, Theodor Herzl, Martin Buber, Franz Rosenzweig, Hannah Arendt and Gershom Scholem. We will use the third volume of the Culture of the Jews as a background text.

HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY I (HSST-1114)

Credits:3

Introduction to the history of the Church, from the second century through the end of the Middle Ages. The course will focus on primary sources attached to key events, with lectures and class discussions. The course will be evaluated through short papers on the primary sources (4 papers of 2-4 pages each) and a final examination. The course is intended for MDiv and MA/MTS students.

HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY II (HSST-1115)

Credits:3

Introduction to the history of the Church, from the fifteenth century through the twentieth. The focus will be on the western (Latin) Church. The course will focus on primary sources attached to key events, with lectures and class discussions. The course will be evaluated through short papers on the primary sources (3 papers of 4-5 pages each). The course is intended for MDiv and MA/MTS students. [Auditors with faculty permission]

LUTHERAN THEO: SOURCES & HERM (HSST-1125)

Credits:3

A study of Lutheran theology with the texts in the Book of Concord in light of their historical roots, significance in Lutheran tradition and global Christianity, and contemporary theological and spiritual considerations. With an ecumenical orientation, the 16th century documents are engaged, critically and constructively, as a companion and living sources for Lutheran spirituality and ministry globally speaking, and for Lutheran spiritually and socially attentive theology that is transformative and speaks to and empowers action vis-a-vis issues of justice and equity and spirituality. Students are invited to explore ways to creatively, faithfully, and intelligently articulate and apply Lutheran hermeneutics in different situations, with new conversation partners and approaches, and with new voices. The study involves an excursion to the specific faces and phases of Lutheranism in the Americas, the place of Lutheran tradition in the framework of global Christianity and the ecumenical scene. [The course prepares ELCA candidates for their required theological review essays.] This course is offered as a seven-week intensive starting the week of October 29, 2018 and ending the week of December 10, 2018. [30 max enrollment]

READiNG CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY IN CONTEXT (HSST-1126)

Credits:3

This course will introduce students to a variety of Christian teachers and theologians and thereby, with their texts, provide students with a framework for the study of Christian faith in context, familiarity with major developments in theological inquiry, and a map for the diversity of sources and voices that speak particularly to the Christian experience of faith over centuries. Chronologically, the materials engaged range from the 3rd century Christian Creeds to the Enlightenment, concluding with the challenges presented in the post-Holocaust and Scientific revolutions reality. The focus in the study is theological, and the primary intent is to connect students with the Christian sources and hermeneutical explorations. Students are invited to orient towards a critical constructive look into their own faith traditions, historical or theological analysis, and/or methodological and source-critical issues. [30 max enrollment]

ANCIENT/MEDIEVAL JEWISH THGHT (HSST-2023)

Credits:3

Ancient Medieval Jewish Civilization This course will examine Jewish civilization from its beginnings in ancient Israel through its development in medieval times. We will examine features of Jewish communal life, as well as the intellectual and religious currents among Jews in the ancient and medieval periods. This course will provide an understanding of the continuities and discontinuities in Jewish history and the overall process of cultural change in Judaism. This course is required for all M.A. and Certificate students at CJS. Weekly response papers/Final Exam.

MODERN JEWISH INTELL& CULT TH (HSST-2025)

Credits:3

This course will investigate major themes in the intellectual and cultural history of the Jews from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries. It will take some of the key thinkers of this period as the lens through which to view cultural developments. The course will start with Shabbatai Zvi and Baruch Spinoza in the seventeenth century and Moses Mendelssohn and Israel Baal Shem Tov in the eighteenth. Other Jewish writers and thinkers we will study include Berthold Auerbach, Heinrich Graetz, Hermann Cohen, Emma Lazarus, Yehuda Leib Gordon, Theodor Herzl, Martin Buber, Franz Rosenzweig, Hannah Arendt and Gershom Scholem. We will use the third volume of the Culture of the Jews as a background text.

GENDER AND JUDAISM (HSST-4000)

Credits:3

This course will explore the intersection between gender and Judaism by exploring the role of gender ideologies in Jewish texts from the Bible to contemporary philosophy; the gendered character of Jewish historical experience; and Judaism as a continually evolving mode of constructing gender. We will begin with reading a few general introductions to the study of gender and religion, moving on to such topics as feminist and queer readings of the Bible and rabbinic sources; childrearing in medieval Jewish life; women in mystical discourse and Hasidic experience; and sexuality and secularization. Seminar will meet in April and May only, on Wednesday and Friday mornings 9:40am-12:30pm.

FREEDOM THEO W/MARTIN LUTHER (HSST-4450)

Credits:3

We will examine a selection of Martin Luther’s works, employing different hermeneutical approaches 1) to re-engage Luther towards in-depth understanding of his theological motifs, arguments, contributions, and shortcomings in light of his own context, and 2) to re-engage Luther theologically with contemporary questions in mind, particularly focusing on the topic of “freedom”. A selection of contemporary interpreters will be consulted. In addition, the class provides first-hand familiarity with Luther’s 16th century texts, a lens for critical assessment of the interpretative traditions and trends in Luther scholarship, practice in critical reading of historical texts, and immersion in constructive Christian theology with a focus on the highly relevant topic of “freedom”.

CLASSICS OF THE XIAN JOURNEY (HSST-4700)

Credits:3

This is a course in historical Christian spirituality, reading classic texts by very diverse writers who used the motif of journey or pilgrimage. It reaches from the second century to the twentieth. The readings change each year, but have included Perpetual of Carthage, Ignatius of Antioch, Origen, Augustine, Gregory of Nyssa, Bernard of Clairvaux, Bonaventure, Dante, Julian of Norwich, Martin Luther, John Bunyan, Teresa of Avila, and Evelyn Underhill. Readings are subject to change until the syllabus is published. Lectures and discussions of the texts. Course work is evaluated through two papers of 8-10 pages each. It is intended for MDiv and MA/MTS students.

HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY II (HSST-8115)

Credits:3

Introduction to the history of the Church, from the fifteenth century through the twentieth. The focus will be on the western (Latin) Church. The course will focus on primary sources attached to key events, with lectures and class discussions. The course is intended for MDiv and MA/MTS students. [Auditors excluded]

SPECIAL TOPICS (HSST-9400)

Credits:3

FALL 2018 ALT THEOS: WOMEN'S VOICES In this class, we will examine women’s theological writings in the Christian tradition. While focusing on the voices of the Medieval and Reformation era women, our study includes also women from the early Christian movement(s) to our day. The primary interest is theology written – and lived - by women and with that reconstruction of both the theological narrative and the essentials of Christian theology. This 4000-level seminar, open to MA/MDiv students, fosters methodological innovation by re-interpreting a significant component of Christian tradition, including women’s works into the corpus of Christian theology, and working theologically with historical materials and gender factors. [30 max enrollment]

THE BUSINESS OF MINISTRY (IDS-1150)

Credits:1

This course provides a brief introduction to business and administration issues that ministers may encounter when working at any level of an organization. The assignments and lectures will help students they transition from the academic world to the workforce and understand how to connect their everyday work with their organizations’ stated missions. The course will explore the fundamentals of strategic planning, leadership and management, organizational structure, resource management, budgeting and financial reporting. Course meetings will include guest lecturers, case study discussions and role playing to familiarize students with questions and challenges they will encounter in everyday office settings. After completing this course, students should feel more comfortable accepting a professional ministry role to make impactful contributions toward the success of a mission-driven organization. It is suitable for any degree program as an elective offering. Course meets 2/6/19-3/6/19. [7 max enrollment]

MCL FOUNDATION SEMINAR (IDS-1200)

Credits:1.5

This is a core course for new students entering the ABSW Masters in Community Leadership program. Students are required to take this 1.5 seminar their first semester as a means of developing and honing their theoretical and practical interests and planning their two year course schedule that will include a six unit internship. The academic plan created in this seminar will be assessed in a final 1.5 course taken the last semester of the student's program. The final assessment will include a lengthy paper that describes the implementation of the student's plan and analyzes his/her theological and professional development. Meeting times TBD.

JR COLLOQIUM: CHURCH HISTORY (IDS-1270)

Credits:3

This course will survey the history of Christianity from its earliest beginnings up to the eve of the Reformation. Special attention will be given to prominent leaders who help shape Christian doctrine. Moreover, key theological, political and social issues will be addressed and primary texts will be used to enhance group discussion. Requirements: Students will write four short reflection papers four to six pages in length.

JR COLLOQIUM: OLD TESTAMENT (IDS-1271)

Credits:3

The successful student will acquire a socio-cultural and theological overview of the Old Testament that focuses on basic content as well as critical issues and exegetical and hermeneutical methodologies. In addition, students will be challenged to become self-aware concerning their own social location and its relationship to reading, thinking, and doing biblical, historical, and theological work associated with the critical issues of the day. Assignments include: four short exegetical papers and one book review.

JR COLLOQIUM: INTRO TO THLGY (IDS-1272)

Credits:3

Required for students entering ABSW in Junior Colloquium. Course introduces first-year students to an integrative and interdisciplinary approach to Christian thought and praxis. Students will be required to integrate the traditional theological disciplines (Biblical Studies, Church History, Religion and Society, and Systematic Theology) with their observations during Ministry site visits. The course introduces students to important theologians and enables students to develop Christian world views and vocational visions that can inform faithful and effective leadership in the Church of the 21st century.

JR COLLOQIUM:CONTEXT GROUPS (IDS-1273)

Credits:3

Required for students entering ABSW in Junior Colloquium. Course introduces first-year students to an integrative and interdisciplinary approach to Christian thought and praxis. Students will be required to integrate the traditional theological disciplines (Biblical Studies, Church History, Religion and Society, and Systematic Theology) with their observations during Ministry site visits. The course introduces students to important theologians and enables students to develop Christian world views and vocational visions that can inform faithful and effective leadership in the Church of the 21st century.

COUNSELING PRINCIPALS & PASTORAL CARE FOR VICTIMS OF TRAUMA (IDS-2100)

Credits:1

This course will explore the experience of trauma, including its cognitive, behavior and spiritual consequences. Counseling approaches will be presented for assisting persons touched with traumatic experiences – sexual assault, intimate partner violence, childhood or elder abuse, political violence, etc. Case studies and role-playing will augment theory and counseling principles. Class meets two Saturdays, 2/23/2018 and 3/9/2019, from 8:30am to 5:00pm in JST 216.

RELIGION WRITING (IDS-2105)

Credits:1

RELIGION WRITING FOR A BROADER PUBLIC The role of religion writing outside of the academy is of increasing importance in turbulent times. Scholars trained in religious studies can play an important role in educating and informing the public about religion, but understanding how a wider audience reads and responds to op-eds, book reviews, analysis and personal essays means thinking about working with editors, readers, and other writers outside of academic disciplines. In this workshop, we’ll examine how to write for secular versus religious audiences, learn how to pitch and work with editors, read and analyze contrasting examples of academic versus popular writing on religion, and generate a few short written pieces. Class meets M/W/F, 1/28/18-2/1/18, from 9:00am to 2:00pm at JST 217.

MIDDLER COLLOQUIUM PRACTICUM I (IDS-2260)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Jennifer Davidson and Nancy Hall. This course is the practicum portion of Middler Colloquium, which meets one night a week, Thursday, for the entire academic year. It is an interdisciplinary two-semester approach to contextual (field) education. Students serve as interns in a ministry setting for the nine-month academic year (placements are finalized during the previous spring semester). This course interfaces with Middler Colloquium Theory (IDS 2261) as part of an integrative model for ministerial training. These two courses must be taken concurrently. Open to ABSW students only. [ABSW Junior Colloquium 12-unit sequence and an additional 12 units of coursework]

MIDDLER COLLOQUIUM THEORY I (IDS-2261)

Credits:3

This course is the theory portion of the Middler Colloquium and meets one night a week, Monday, for the entire academic year. It is an interdisciplinary course which emphasizes the study of the New Testament (Gospels) and ecclesiology, as well as the arts of preaching and worship. This course interfaces with the Middler Colloquium Practicum I (IDS 2260). Open to ABSW students only. [ABSW Junior Colloquium 12-unit sequence and an additional 12 units of coursework]

MENTOR YEAR PROJECT I (IDS-3260)

Credits:3

Mentor Year Project is a two-semester (Fall-3units/Spring-3units)/six unit seminar in which MDiv/MCL students research, design, develop, implement, and document a multi-faceted project in ministry/community leadership that addresses a contemporary problem/need in the church and/or wider community.

ANTI-BLACK RACISM: WOMEN & GIRLS (IDS-4212)

Credits:3

“Where does this disdain of global Blackness come from?” Many historians root the ills of this philosophical racism to the eighteenth and nineteenth century Enlightenment writings like those of David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Thomas Jefferson, Georg Hegel, etc. This course will engage the anti-black racism negative ascriptions or stamp that has been signified upon Blackness today. Thus, to engage in efforts to recover Black materiality from racial opacity. Utilizing the narrative of Liza Bramlett, Fannie Lou Hamer's grandmother, who was a sexually exploited and the unnamed Black woman who was publicly-strip searched on the streets of Baltimore by the Eastern District Police, the black women raped by Oklahoma City Police Officer Daniel Holtzclaw and Susanna from the Apocrypha. This course will illustrate historical and contemporary inhumane acts against Black women and girls. Students MUST contact the instructor for approval prior to registering for this course. Evaluation Method: Term paper, daily assignments, presentation, pre-assignment and class participation. Intended Audience: Mdiv, MASC, DMin. Course is available from 1.5-3 units and meets daily, 1/22/19-1/26/19, from 8am-5pm at SKSM. [Introduction to Ethics & First and Second Testament; 30 max enrollment]

SEMINAR ON INTERDISCIPLINARITY (IDS-6000)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Arthur Holder and Rossitza Schroeder and co-offered by GTU and PSR. Through collaborative-based learning projects, students and teachers will explore critical issues and develop sound criteria for doing interdisciplinary work in religious studies. Students will practice skills for formulating research questions, engage in learning the present contours of the fields that will constitute their primary and secondary concentrations and outside disciplines, and begin to develop an academic plan for their studies at the GTU from course work through the comprehensive examination and eventually the dissertation. Requirements: student presentations, a draft academic plan, two short written reports, a book review, and a research prospectus. This course is required for all students in the first year of the GTU PhD program. Course meets in the Collaborative Learning Space and in the Dinner Board Room at the Flora Lamson Hewlett Library.

CHRISTIAN WORSHIP (LS-1201)

Credits:3

For many communities of faith, worship forms the heart of their life together. It is a place where participants learn the behaviors, rhythms, and patterns of faith that form them for lives of spiritual and social transformation. In this introduction to the practice of worship, we will examine the ways in which worship both shapes and is shaped by culture, history, theology, language, and practice. As we investigate the different movements and rhythms of worship and sacraments, students will learn to harness the power of embodied spiritual and ritual practices in different ministry contexts by critically and constructively engaging liturgical texts and contexts, by designing multisensory, intercultural, and meaningful worship services, and by practicing their leadership of different elements of worship, all while immersing themselves in their own unique religious/denominational, historical, and cultural styles of worship. This lecture/discussion course will be evaluated by attendance, participation, critical and constructive reflection essays, quizzes and worship design projects.

WORSHIP LAB (LS-2171)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Jennifer Davidson and Nancy Hall. Students enrolled in this course will develop practical worship planning skills that are intentionally multicultural, historically informed, and theologically robust. Participants will be given the opportunity to engage in discussion and hands-on creation of different elements of worship in a collaborative environment. Mindful participation in worship experiences will be cultivated through weekly, focused worship journals that encourage students to pay attention to particular themes related to course content. Students need to attend weekly worship experiences in order to fulfill the worship journal requirement. Required readings will help inform students' perspectives. Guest speakers will provide rich and diverse perspectives on worship planning approaches. This course is taught from and toward Christian worshiping contexts. It is primarily intended for MDiv and MCL degree programs, although MA students with a particular interest in worship may also enjoy this course. NOTE: This is the identical course to IDS 2260; ABSW MDiv students should register only for IDS 2260 during their middler year.

PLAN WORSHIP-DAY SEASON THEME (LS-2175)

Credits:1.5

Using as our course textbook "The New Manual of Worship," (Judson Press, April 2018) by Dr. Nancy Hall, students will explore basics of worship planning, the Christian liturgical year, and special days, seasons, and themes that are part of congregational life. We’ll be writing prayers, creating liturgies, and singing hymns and songs for various occasions. Weekly reading assignments will include thought-provoking articles from online blogs, journals, and other sources on the nature of worship in an era of shifting demographics, interfaith partnerships, and boundary-crossing theologies. Learn about online and print resources that will help you plan innovative and rich worship and music experiences for any congregation. This course is open to all students in the GTU and also to community members and auditors -- lay persons, directors and ministers of music, pastors and ministry staff....all denominations and faith traditions....everyone is warmly welcomed! [Auditors with faculty permission]

LIVING WORSHIP A (LS-2225)

Credits:2

Utilizing both classroom and practicum work, this two-semester course will immerse students in the exploration of histories, theologies, and contexts of Lutheran worship in local and global expressions; preparation of worship for weekly seminary chapel services; development of working theologies of baptism, communion, and worship; engagement with ritual care practices and services for life passages; and embodiment of postures, gestures, rubrics, and contents in order to find and develop their own worship leadership style. Evaluation will be based on participation, worship preparation, and written assignments. [20 max enrollment]

LIVING WORSHIP B (LS-2226)

Credits:2

Utilizing both classroom and practicum work, this two-semester course will immerse students in the exploration of histories, theologies, and contexts of Lutheran worship in local and global expressions; preparation of worship for weekly seminary chapel services; development of working theologies of baptism, communion, and worship; engagement with ritual care practices and services for life passages; and embodiment of postures, gestures, rubrics, and contents in order to find and develop their own worship leadership style. Evaluation will be based on participation, worship preparation, and written assignments. [LS-2225 Living Worship A, 20 max enrollment]

LITURGICAL LEADERSHIP (LSFT-2115)

Credits:1.5

This course is a practicum for MDiv students preparing for holy orders in Anglicanism which will allow them to experience the process of preparation, performance and reflection on liturgical presiding at the rites of Eucharist, Initiation, Marriage, Anointing, Reconciliation and Funerals. Evaluation will be based on each student's participation in classroom liturgies in roles of assisting, presiding and peer evaluation, including presiding at a recorded eucharistic liturgy.

ADVANCED WORSHIP DESIGN (LSFT-2143)

Credits:1.5

This practicum course consists of working as a team to design, plan, and carry out worship for weekly chapel and other occasional services at the Pacific School of Religion. Students will gain experience with planning and carrying out worship in a variety of styles through a small group process. We will explore the nuts and bolts of designing meaningful, multisensory, and creative worship while reflecting on the historical, cultural, theological, embodied, and practical aspects that shape the experience of worship in contemporary communities of faith. Evaluation is based on attendance, participation, evaluation of chapel services, curation of chapel service(s) and a final critical reflection paper. It is geared toward MDiv. students, but all are welcome. Course meeting times coincide with Chapel Planning Committee Meetings on Mondays from 5:15-6:30pm in the small dining room of D’Autremont Hall, and with Chapel services on Tuesdays from 10am-12pm in the PSR Chapel. 3-4 other discussion sessions will be arranged in consultation with the professor and other students.

CELEBRATION OF THE SACRAMENTS (LSFT-2404)

Credits:1.5

A PRACTICUM: This course will introduce those in formation for priesthood in the Roman Catholic Church to the celebration of the sacraments and other liturgical rites according to the Ordinary Form of the Latin Rite. The course offers an opportunity to integrate their lived understanding of the liturgy through the study and practice of leading it. Students in the course will be encouraged to pursue their own learning goals through the way they approach the course assignments. Format: Practice liturgy sessions with discussion before and after each, with some sessions to be audio-&-video recorded. Course is normally taken Pass/Fail. Intended Audience: Candidates for the presbyterate in the Roman Catholic Church. Prerequisites: A course in liturgy and a course in sacramental theology. Course meets at St. Albert's Priory in Oakland.

REFORMED WORSHIP (LSFT-2525)

Credits:3

This course is designed to introduce students to the nature and practice of worship and the sacraments in the Reformed Tradition. Worship and the sacraments of Baptism and the Lord's Supper are studied biblically, historically, and theologically, as well as in contemporary settings. Worship ad pastoral issues attendant to the celebration of weddings and funerals are examined. Skills necessary to leading worship effectively are rehearsed. Preparation for the PCUSA Ordination Exams included in lectures and discussion materials.

INTRODUCTION TO WORSHIP (LSHS-1100)

Credits:3

SUMMER 2018 A lecture course for first-year students (MDiv and MA/MTS) who are preparing for ordination and/or liturgical leadership in the Episcopal Church. This course introduces students to the study of liturgy and its practice in worshipping communities. We will examine the nature of ritual; dimensions of Christian liturgy, including symbol, space, time, and texts; and the historical development of Christian liturgy, with particular attention to the development of Anglican worship. Evaluation includes participation based upon assigned readings and written assignments. Course meets weekdays, 6/11/18-6/22/18, from 2pm-5:45pm at CDSP. FALL 2018 This course introduces students to the study of liturgy and its practice in worshipping communities. We will examine the nature of ritual; dimensions of Christian liturgy, including symbol, space, time, and texts; and the historical development of Christian liturgy, with particular attention to the development of Anglican worship. Intended for students (MDiv, MA, MTS) who are preparing for ordination and/or liturgical leadership. Evaluation includes participation based upon assigned readings and written assignments. [Auditors with faculty permission]

LITURGCL HISTRY EARLY/MEDIEVAL (LSHS-5120)

Credits:3

This course will introduce students to the rich heritage of Christian worship. Using history as a vehicle for theological inquiry, it will begin with biblical evidence for worship traditions and trace them through the patristic period to their Byzantine and Medieval forms. Students will become familiar with key figures, documents, and trends in the evolution of liturgical rites. The course will combine lecture and seminar discussions. Evaluation will be based on two in-class presentations and a final paper.

RITES OF PASSAGE NEW BEGINNINGS (LSPS-2000)

Credits:1.5

New beginnings — like marriage or the birth/adoption of a child — are joyful, but they can also demand the navigation of complicated family dynamics. The wise religious/spiritual leader is prepared to celebrate these occasions reverently and responsibly. Most of this weekend intensive course will focus on weddings, which require that clergy/officiants wield several separate but interrelated skill sets: ministry as relationship-building (often with an unchurched couple); attention to the theology, language, and liturgical flow that provide ceremonies with depth and meaning; and the “ad-ministry” of attention to details that, if held carefully, will lead to a seamless rehearsal and ceremony. We’ll spend time on best practices, the importance of contracts, and creating savvy boundaries. A portion of the weekend will address ceremonies that celebrate the arrival of children into families — whether through birth or adoption. Students will also have the opportunity to explore rites of passage celebrating other forms of “new beginnings.” Students may take both or one of the Rites of Passage intensive weekend courses. This course relates to SKSM Thresholds 1, 5, 8 and MFC Comps 1 & 2. Evaluation method: reflection papers, role play scenarios. Intended Audience - MDiv, MA/MTS, DMin. [20 max enrollment]. This course is hybrid and meets: Friday, 3/22/2019, from 9:00am-5:00pm; Saturday, 3/23/2019, from 10:00am-6:00pm; Sunday, 3/24/2019, 1:00pm-7:00pm; at SKSM.

RITES OF PASSAGE: LETTING GO (LSPS-2001)

Credits:1.5

Whether it takes the form of death, separation/divorce, a frightening medical diagnosis, or even the loss of a pregnancy, loss is a normal part of the human experience — but it can be challenging to surrender to the grieving process, to make sense of our loss within our religious/spiritual framework, and to trust that the unknown territory of mourning might carry us toward new meaning. This weekend intensive course will focus on crafting and leading rites of passage that give outward expression to the breadth of human loss. Most of the course will focus on memorial services, where we’ll divide our work between the content of these services — their theology, language, and liturgical components — and the pastoral responsibilities and hazards that might arise. A portion of this course will be spent exploring other significant or painful endings, rarely addressed by traditional rites of passage, to ask how communities of faith might respond to the pastoral needs and opportunities entailed therein. Students may take both or one of the Rites of Passage intensive weekend courses. This course relates to SKSM Thresholds 1, 5, 8 and MFC Comps 1 & 2. This course is high-residence hybrid. Format: Evaluation method: reflection papers and written project. Intended Audience: MDiv, MA/MTS, DMin. [20 max enrollment]. Class meets: Friday, 2/22/2019, from 9:00am-5:00pm; Saturday, 2/23/2019, from 10:00am-6:00pm; Sunday, 2/24/2019, 1:00pm-7:00pm; at SKSM.

FOUNDATIONS OF CATHOLIC LITURGY (LSRA-1500)

Credits:3

FOUNDATIONS OF CATHOLIC LITURGY: THE ONGOING WORK OF JESUS CHRIST The purpose of this course is to provide a general introduction to Christian liturgy in the Roman (Latin) Rite by examining principles of worship from anthropological, historical, spiritual, and theological perspectives. The principle of “lex orandi/lex credenda” will be explored through an examination of the roles that symbol, culture, fine arts plan in Catholic worship and liturgy. Topics covered included liturgical drama, sacred time and liturgical seasons, sacred numbers and art and architecture. The intended audience includes MDiv, MA, STL, STD, and PhD students. The latter may upgrade as needed. [Auditors with faculty permission]

LITURGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (LSRA-3500)

Credits:3

This course will explore the historical, philosophical and biological aspects of the meaning of “conscious and active participation” by the laity. The first part introduces students to key concepts discussed by theologians of the so-called liturgical movement, namely “active and intelligent participation” as guided by a “liturgical piety” cultivated in the lay faithful. The second part introduces students to the philosophical anthropology of St. Thomas Aquinas, Jacques Maritain, and other relevant philosophers so as to develop practical insights for the cultivation of a legitimate “liturgical piety.” In the third part, student will be introduced to basic principles from the field of “aesthetic science” (also known as neuroaesthetics) to understand how contemporary science explores these same topics. Because of its central role in Catholic liturgy, music and its impact on cognitive function and pro-social behavior will receive particular attention. Students will demonstrate their mastery of this material by creating and presenting a preliminary design concept for a catechetical program instructing either artists or parish-based groups on the meaning and development of a legitimate liturgical piety. The course is intended for MDiv, MA, STL, and STD students; the latter may upgrade as needed. [Faculty Consent required; 10 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

VOCALIZING THEOLOGY: PRAYER, ELOCUTION, & LITURGICAL COMMUNICATION (LSRA-4250)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Drew Khalouf and John Klentos. This course will explore how Christian prayers communicate meanings through their composition and performance. Students will work with instructors to analyze prayer texts’ structure and theology and then to vocalize the prayers in a way that creates meanings within a worshiping community. Textual analysis will engage the Left Brain by considering constituent elements, organizational strategies, and the theological message/s encoded in prayer texts. Students will engage their Right Brains by exploring how the techniques of good speech allow the words of the English language to be used to their greatest effect, using the Presider’s voice to shape the wounds of words in ways that most clearly convey the prayers’ basic meaning, but with sounds used in specific ways that reinforce the conceptual and sensual essence of the prayers’ deeper theological meaning. Students will learn how to discover the theological dynamics contained within prayer texts (drawn from a spectrum of times and liturgical traditions) and then progress to communicating theology effectively by utilizing specific vocal tools to imbue each word as fully as possible with psychological sound-triggers that fill it as full of meaning and captivating visceral impact as possible. Students will be evaluated on (1) three written analyses of prayer texts, (2) four in-class Vocal Exegeses of the analyzed prayer texts, (3) a final, synthetic reflection on how the student integrated textual analysis and vocalization techniques to reveal the literary beauty and theological richness of specific prayer texts. [12 max enrollment]

LITURGICS (LSST-2106)

Credits:3

Liturgics is a lecture/discussion course in sacramental theology with special attention to sacraments and sacramental rites as acts of the church. Primary focus will be on rites of Christian initiation and eucharist, with a secondary focus on ordination, confession, anointing the sick, marriage, and burial. Particular attention will be given to the Anglican tradition and the rites of the Episcopal Church. Evaluation is based on attendance, required readings, and written assignments. Intended for MDiv and MA/MTS students and those enrolled for the Certificate in Anglican Studies. [introductory course in Christian worship, or permission of instructor; Faculty Consent required; Auditors with faculty permission]

ECOLOGY AND LITURGY (LSST-4015)

Credits:3

This seminar explores the vital connection between human concern for the Earth and its creatures, and worship of the living God. Readings and discussion will focus on scientific, liturgical and theological writings from a broad range of authors that illuminate the convergence of ecology and worship, and that propose a path toward deeper ethical and liturgical response to the global ecological crises that mark our times. Special attention will be given to perspectives of Ignatian spirituality and mission. Students will develop research papers or annotated bibliographies related to their specific interests. (MDiv, MA, MTS, DMin) [Faculty Consent required; 15 max enrollment]

INCULTURATION AND LITURGY (LSST-4181)

Credits:3

This course will explore the theology and practice of the inculturation and liturgical inculturation from a Roman Catholic perspective within the larger arena of World Christianity. Course readings will draw on writings of theologians from various parts of the world as well as key church documents. Focus will be given to globalization, interculturality, multiple religious belonging, popular religion, hybridity, women, environmental degradation, and the challenge of each for worship in a global church. Discussion/reading will explore Asian, African, Latin American, Asian American, Latino, and African American perspectives and practices of inculturation. Students will develop research papers or annotated bibliographies related to their specific interests. (MDiv, MA, MTS, DMin). [Faculty Consent required; 12 max enrollment]

CHRIST & SPIRIT IN LITURGY (LSST-4511)

Credits:3

LITURGICS (LSST-8206)

Credits:3

Liturgics is a lecture/discussion course in sacramental theology with special attention to sacraments and sacramental rites as acts of the church. Primary focus will be on rites of Christian initiation and eucharist, with a secondary focus on ordination, confession, anointing the sick, marriage, and burial. Particular attention will be given to the Anglican tradition and the rites of the Episcopal Church. Evaluation is based on weekly online assignments and major written assignments; 10-12 hours per week of reading and online work are required. Intended for MDiv and MA/MTS students and those enrolled for the Certificate in Anglican Studies. Prerequisite: introductory course in Christian worship, or permission of instructor. [Faculty Consent required; Auditors with faculty permission]

GTU MA Research Methods (MA 1000)

Credits:3

GTU MA RESEARCH METHODS (MA-1000)

Credits:3

This course introduces MA students to basic and advanced research and writing methods for graduate work in religious studies. The first section of the course is a brief introduction to religious studies as an academic discipline focusing on major theorists, methodological and theoretical approaches, and bibliographic resources. The second section centers on how to conduct thorough and creative research in order to effectively address a topic of interest. The last segment of the course focuses on writing well-researched papers that contain a solid thesis, supporting evidence, original voice, suitable style, and correct citations. By the end of this course each student will complete several short writing assignments, a draft thesis proposal, and a 10-15 page research paper in the student's area of interest. This course is intended primarily for GTU MA students in any stage of the program, but is also open to other masters' level students focusing on academic research.

SAIL CAPSTONE FOR MAST (MA-4060)

Credits:3

The SAIL Project (Social Analysis for Innovative Leadership) is the capstone project for the Master of Arts in Social Transformation degree. Students choose either to write a thesis or to create an e-portfolio demonstrating effective engagement with the degree's learning outcomes. Students meet with each other and the instructor three or four times over the course of the semester to share insights into strategies about their projects. [Faculty Consent required]

IN THESIS (MA-5000)

Credits:12

All Masters level students in the GTU community should use this designation if they are working on their thesis. Course available for 0.5-12 units.

MASC PROJECT (MA-5300)

Credits:0.5

For SKSM Master of Arts in Social Change (MASC) students only. MASC students can split this course over two semesters or sign up for it during their last semester. This final project can take a variety of forms and should be representative of the student’s learning and creative work in the MASC degree. Projects include research thesis, public presentations, designing and implementing educational curricula, organizing local/national conferences and special events, multimedia art-work, writing a book and more. The thesis topic, proposal and final draft need to be discussed and developed with the faculty. The project can have a public presentation. A total of 3 MASC Project credits are required for graduation in the MASC degree. Please discuss with instructor. This course is available for 0.5-3 units. [Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded]

MA COLLOQUIUM (MA-5505)

Credits:3

Only for students in the MA (Philosophy), non-thesis track who are in their final year of studies.

GTU MA RESEARCH METHODS (MA-8100)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to master’s level research methods and writing for religious studies. The course will begin with a brief introduction to religious studies as an academic discipline, focusing on major theorists, methodological and theoretical approaches, and bibliographic resources. The remainder of the course will address effective reading and research methods; clear, graduate-level academic writing; and the construction, from start to finish, of well-researched papers that contain a solid thesis, supporting evidence, original voice, suitable style, and correct citations. By the end of this course each student will complete several short writing assignments, a draft thesis proposal, and a 10-12-page research paper in the student’s area of interest. This course is intended primarily for GTU MA students but is also open to other master’s level students focusing on academic research. This course is offered every semester, as an in-person course in the Fall semesters (MA-1000) and a fully online course in the Spring semesters (MA-8100). The online version will be conducted asynchronously through Moodle, and will be highly participatory, with regular student posts supplemented by interactive and collaborative activities and audio-visual resources. [Auditors excluded]

DOMINICAN EXCHANGE PROGRAM (MDV-3025)

Credits:12

For DSPT students only. In order for exchange programs to be recorded on the permanent academic record, students must register for this course. There is a $50.00 charge per semester. Registration is necessary for students who wish to receive academic credit for their work in the exchange program or who wish to have student loan deferments certified for the time in which they participate in the exchange program. Course available for 0 to 12 units.

SENIOR INTEGRATIVE PROJECT/SEM (MDV-4500)

Credits:1.5

The Senior Integrative Seminar is a 1.5 credit class to be taken in the M.Div. student's final semester at Pacific School of Religion. The purpose of the seminar is to assess your learning process: how and what have your learned while at PSR? This will occur by evaluating your learning in relationship to PSR's Institutional Learning Outcomes and by taking account of any issues raised in your Middler Review. You will need to refer back to that review to show how you have worked on the issues raised at that time. Four case studies to choose among will be presented. Students will be able to choose which case study to engage. You will then be asked to reflect on the case study by responding to a series of questions over a seven-week period. The questions are designed to evaluate your ability to integrate your MDiv studies in facing an important contemporary issue in society. Letter Grade Only [Faculty Consent required]

SENIOR INTEGRATIVE PRJCT/SEM (MDV-8400)

Credits:1.5

The Senior Integrative Seminar is a 1.5 credit class to be taken in the M.Div. student's final semester at Pacific School of Religion. The purpose of the seminar is to assess your learning process: how and what have your learned while at PSR? This will occur by evaluating your learning in relationship to PSR's Institutional Learning Outcomes and by taking account of any issues raised in your Middler Review. You will need to refer back to that review to show how you have worked on the issues raised at that time. A case study will be presented. You will then be asked to reflect on the case study by responding to a series of questions over a seven-week period. The questions are designed to evaluate your abilities in relationship to PSR's Institutional Learning Outcomes. For more details, see the syllabus for the online section. LETTER GRADE ONLY [Faculty Consent required]

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (MIFA-214)

Credits:3

FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS (MIMG-267)

Credits:3

MTS PROSEMINAR (MTS-3000)

Credits:0

MTS Proseminar, for JST students in the last semester of their MTS program, occasions a ^look back^ in the fall with a view that synthesizes one's theological studies and a ^look forward^ in the spring with a vision that imagines the next step integrated with one's past theological work. The contextual nature of all theology as well as approaches for doing theological reflection inform the synthesis. How various theological disciplines inform one another as well as how theological studies can shape and impact one's work in life crafts the integration. [Faculty Consent required; Interview required; 10 max enrollment: Auditors excluded]

MTS CONTINUING REGISTRATION (MTS-3001)

Credits:1

For JST MTS students only who have not yet completed their paper/project, but completed all course work. Students must register for this course each semester until work is completed. Pass/Fail only.

MTS SYNTHESIS ESSAY (MTS-5020)

Credits:1.5

For PSR students working on the Master of Theological Studies Synthesis Essay. Pass/Fail only. Course may be taken for 0.0-1.5 units.

Language Requirement (NC-LANG)

Credits:0

NOVITIATE YEAR (NOV-1100)

Credits:12

For DSPT students only. Students enrolled in the Western Dominicans Novitiate Program (a program of DSPT) must register for this course for both semesters of their Novitiate Program. Course available for 0-12 units.

NT INTRODUCTION: PAUL (NT-1001)

Credits:3

PAULINE EPISTLES. This course is an introduction to the life, work, and theology of Paul as they are reflected in his seven undisputed epistles in the New Testament and in other related documents within and outside the NT. The course will first reconstruct Paul’s life and ministry and then survey his letters in their chronological order. Special attention will be paid to the particular historical circumstances and theological concerns of each letter. The primary mode of inquiry in this course is historical-critical, but hermeneutical questions will also be raised with regard to the application of Pauline theology to current theological issues.

INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW TESTAMENT (NT-1002)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to the field New Testament Studies, providing a representative view of the various components within the contemporary study of the discipline, its texts and contexts. First, we will explore “traditional” approaches to the New Testament, focusing on the texts and contexts of the past, and how recent scholarship has defined some of the main topics (Composition, Synoptic problems, etc.,) Second, using more recent developments in the discipline, we will attend to different trajectories of interpretation that pay close attention to the way different communities understand, represent, and re-appropriate the New Testament for different theological and ideological purposes (Imperial and Postcolonial Studies, Feminist and Queer Approaches, Liberationist Readings). [30 max enrollment]

INTRO TO NEW TESTAMENT (NT-1003)

Credits:3

This course will introduce the issues basic to the study of New Testament texts, reviewing the historical and social contexts, surveying the literature in terms of its referents and rhetoric. There will be an emphasis on the continuity between the two biblical testaments. The basic critical tools of modern biblical study will be utilized. The format will be lecture and discussion, with prepared participation expected and occasional short written assignments anticipated. [Faculty Consent required]

NT INTRODUCTION: (NT-1004)

Credits:3

GOSPELS AND ACTS. This course is a general introduction to the canonical and apocryphal Gospels and Acts in early Christian literature. Major methodological issues in current Gospel scholarship will be introduced first. Then, each text of the Gospels and Acts will be interpreted in terms of its literary characteristics, historical background and theological ideas. Throughout the course, explicitly or implicitly, hermeneutical implications of the critical interpretation of the bible will be raised and discussed. This course is taught by PhD student Grace Eunhye So with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Dr. Eugene Eung-Chun Park.

INTRODUCTION TO NEW TESTAMENT (NT-1009)

Credits:3

The course introduces students to the New Testament, from historical, literary, socio-cultural and theological perspectives. It focuses on the distinct nature of each document, the context of authorship, the issues the authors addressed, and the theological message for the ancient and present reader. Format: Lecture, discussions. Evaluation: Research papers, reflection papers, formulating discussion questions. Intended audience: MDiv, MA/MTS.

CHRISTIAN SCRIPTURES (NT-1013)

Credits:3

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the collection of writings that we come to call the New Testament. In this course students will become familiar with the historical context, culture, and the politics that lead to the production of this text. In addition to the traditional historical critical approach to the text, students will be introduced to other methods such as feminist, queer, postmodern, and postcolonial readings that will help us deconstruct these texts and reconstruct interpretations that are socially, ethically, and politically relevant to the world we live.

NT INTRODUCTION: GOSPELS (NT-1014)

Credits:3

This course is a general introduction to the canonical and apocryphal Gospels and Acts in early Christian literature. Major methodological issues in current Gospel scholarship will be introduced first. Then, each text of the Gospels and Acts will be interpreted in terms of its literary characteristics, historical background and theological ideas. Throughout the course hermeneutical implications of the critical interpretation of the bible will be raised and discussed.

NEW TESTAMENT EXEGESIS (NT-2000)

Credits:3

This is an introduction to major hermeneutical theories from Romanticism to postmodernity and standard exegetical methods currently practiced in New Testament scholarship. Theoretical discussion will be followed by interpretation of selected passages from various parts of the New Testament. Due attention will be given to the ordination exam of the PCUSA, while the course aims at wider applicability.

PAUL: ANCNT CNTXTS,MOD CONSEQS (NT-2225)

Credits:1.5

This course is an introduction to the field of Pauline Studies, providing a representative view of the various components within the contemporary study of the discipline, its texts and contexts. First, we will explore “traditional” approaches within Pauline Studies, focusing on the texts and contexts of the past, and how recent scholarship has defined some of the main topics (Law, Grace, Israel, etc.) Second, using more recent developments in the discipline, we will attend to different trajectories of interpretation that pay close attention to the way different communities understand, represent, and re-appropriate Paul for different theological and ideological purposes (Imperial and Postcolonial Studies, Feminist and Queer Approaches, Liberationist Readings). [30 max enrollment]

THE SYNOPTIC GOSPELS (NT-2235)

Credits:3

This lecture course first reviews critical and methodological issues in the study of the Synoptic Gospels. Exegesis of selected passages will be used to provide in-depth understanding of the origins of the Synoptic traditions and their theology, ecclesiology and eschatology as seen in the life, Passion, and Resurrection of Jesus and in the early Church. This discussion will include the Christological titles, the miracles of Jesus, the parables of the Kingdom, the Sermon on the Mount, the Passion Narrative, and the Resurrection Narrative. Students will be expected to provide a one-page response to eight selections of readings to be posted on moodle. By the end of the course the student will have an understanding of the first-century historical background to the gospels in the Jewish and Greco-Roman worlds and be able to discuss the historical and theological issues of the Synoptic Gospels against the background of first-century Judaism. Evaluation will be based on the weekly essays (25%), a mid-term (20%), an 8-12 page research paper (25%), and a final examination (30%). [Introduction to New Testament or equivalent - consult with professor if in doubt; PIN code required; 25 max enrollment]

THE GOSPEL OF JOHN (NT-2251)

Credits:3

This course explores John's Gospel by examining its contexts, purpose, view of Jesus' identity and works, theological message and contemporary relevance. A comparison of the Fourth Gospel with the Synoptic Gospels will help reveal the distinctiveness of John. The Interpretation of selected passages will help identify ways in which the revelation imparted in the life of Jesus, interpreted for the Johannine community, speaks to our situations today. Format: lecture, discussions. Evaluation: Research papers, presentations. Intended audience: MDiv, MA, MTS. [15 max enrollment]

JOHANNINE CORPUS (NT-2277)

Credits:3

This lecture course for MDiv and MA/MTS students provides a critical survey of the Gospel of John, the Johannine Epistles, and the Revelation of John (Apocalypse) with respect to authorship, date and place of composition, and community. Jewish background to this body of writing is important as are concerns with who truly rules the world and commands allegiance. The course will identify identify the complex chains of vocabulary and expanding symbols that provide the matrix for Johannine christology, soteriology, and eschatology. There will be a detailed exegesis of key passages of the Gospel of John. The letters will be briefly discussed as exhortations based on the Farewell discourses as the community deals with threats from within and without. The Revelation of John will be presented against late first-century concerns with the Roman Imperial Cult and Christian worship. Evaluation will be based on ten weekly topical summaries of readings posted on Moodle (25%), midterm exam (25%), research paper (25%) and a final exam (25%). [Pauline Corpus or equivalent; Faculty Consent required; Auditors with faculty permission]

TEACH/PREACH JESUS HISTORY (NT-2416)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to the history and methods of historical Jesus research, and examines how the Jesus of history can be effectively taught and preached in the contemporary church context. The course will compare gospel and Pauline traditions as well as consider the influence of ancient Mediterranean cultures and values. Throughout the course we will consider how historical Jesus ideas can shape views of spirituality, human rights, and God. Students will be asked to offer their own narratives of the “Jesus of history.” Class meets weeknights, 1/7/2019-1/18/2019, from 6:10pm-9:30pm at ABSW.

Pauline Epistles (NT-2508)

Credits:3

An examination of Paul’s letters in their original socio-historical and religious context. Various methods and approaches in biblical interpretation will be used to understand the possible meanings of specific texts and their relevance for contemporary Christians and ministry. Format: Lecture, seminars, online discussions, group discussions. Evaluation: short papers and exegesis paper. Audience: MDiv/MA/MTS.

THE PAULINE CORPUS (NT-2520)

Credits:3

This lecture course for MDiv and MA/MTS students first considers the relationship between the figure of Paul in the Acts of the Apostles and in the letters. Then the course will present a reading of the thirteen letters making up the Pauline corpus with a view to developing an understanding of the major issues in Pauline anthropology, soteriology, eschatology and ecclesiology, including sin, death, law, grace, salvation, expiation, ransom, sanctification, freedom, justification, reconciliation, new creation, transformation. The course will consider the development of Paul’s gospel, examine why justification by faith entered into Pauline soteriology after 1 Corinthians, and follow the trajectory of Pauline ideas in Colossians, Ephesians and the Pastoral Epistles. Where necessary, issues of authorship and integrity of composition will be discussed. Evaluation will be based on nine (9) short response essays to material posted on moodle (20%); a short mid-term (15%); an 8-12 page research paper (30%); a final exam (35%). [Intro to NT or equivalent; Faculty Consent required; 25 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

METHODS:STUDY OF THE SYNOPTICS (NT-2530)

Credits:3

Canon, Gospel literary genre. Synoptic fact. Contents and theological perspectives of the synoptic gospels. Introduction to exegetical methods such as historical criticism, narrative criticism and reader's response. Format: Lectures/discussion. Evaluation: Written assignments/research paper/in class and online discussions. The course is intended for MDiv, MTS, MA, and STL students. [20 max enrollment]

GOSPEL OF MATTHEW IN CONTEXTS (NT-4450)

Credits:3

This is a seminar interpreting the Gospel of Matthew in its historical setting in the first century Mediterranean world as well as in the 21st century postmodern global environment. The class will discuss some of the major shifts of perspectives in current Matthean scholarship regarding the author’s relation with Judaism. Then major themes of Matthew’s theological ideas will be discussed along with pertinent Matthean passages. Doctoral students can upgrade this course to the 5000 level with additional work. Course will meet in Berkeley at a location TBD.

LUKE-ACTS: NARRATIVE PRSPCTIVE (NT-4495)

Credits:3

Study of Luke-Acts from narrative perspective. Focus on its perspectives on Jesus, the Spirit, the disciples, the Church, the role of women, and salvation. Format: Lecture/seminar. Evaluation: Participation and research papers. Greek not mandatory but helpful. [Faculty Consent required; 15 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

NT & CRITICAL THEO (NT-5462)

Credits:1.5

Seminar. New Testament Studies comprise a wide array of methods and hermeneutical approaches to the biblical texts. In addition to Historical-Critical, Literary, and Socio-Scientific Approaches, Cultural Studies and Ideological Criticism have offered in the last twenty-five years ground-breaking insights on the biblical texts and, more importantly, on the nature, boundaries, and scope of the discipline of Biblical Studies itself. In the present seminar we will explore these trajectories of interpretation with particular attention to Postcolonial, Queer, and Critical Race Studies. [Faculty Consent required; 10 max enrollment]

NT INTRODUCTION: PAUL (NT-8101)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to the life, work, and theology of Paul as they are reflected in his seven undisputed epistles in the New Testament and in other related documents within and outside the NT. The course will first reconstruct Paul’s life and ministry and then survey his letters in their chronological order. Special attention will be paid to the particular historical circumstances and theological concerns of each letter. The primary mode of inquiry in this course is historical-critical, but hermeneutical questions will also be raised with regard to the application of Pauline theology to current theological issues. This class is the online version of NT-1001. [20 max enrollment]

INTRODUCTION TO THE NT (NT-8109)

Credits:3

FALL 2018 The course introduces students to the New Testament, from historical, literary, sociocultural and theological perspectives. It focuses on the distinct nature of each document, the context of authorship, the issues the authors addressed, and the theological message for the ancient and present reader. [18 max enrollment] SPRING 2019 This course provides a survey of the New Testament. Details TBA.

INTRO TO GOSPELS & ACTS (NT-8115)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to the New Testament Gospels and Acts and other (extra-canonical) early Christian literature as part of the interpretation of early Christianity. The course is designed to help students to engage theoretical frameworks and cultivate critical skills for ongoing independent interpretation, questioning, debate and engagement. The overarching organization of this course is historical-cultural-critical.

PREACHING THE GOSPELS (NTHM-1100)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Michael Burch and Sangyil Park. This course, focusing on a critical survey of the Gospels and the theological and practical aspects of preaching, will help students learn and hone their exegetical and homiletical skills related to the teachings of Jesus and critical contemporary issues in ministry including gender and racial equality, poverty, oppression, resistance, and reconciliation. Students will write two exegetical papers and preach two sermons in class. No prerequisite required.

PREACHING PAUL (NTHM-1105)

Credits:3

The letters of Paul are the earliest texts in the Christian scriptures. What is the religious and political context into which they emerged? How were they first interpreted? What homiletic methodologies help us preach these texts to a contemporary audience? Whether you've been preaching for years or are merely curious about what the Pauline epistles are, this course will provide you with information to deepen your understanding of the ancient contexts and explore the implications for preaching present-day controversies about these texts. NOTE: This is the identical course to IDS-2263; ABSW MDiv students should register only for IDS-2263 during their middler year. [Auditors excluded]

RACIALIZING JESUS (NTRS-2000)

Credits:3

This course explores “racialized” representations of Jesus in the New Testament, biblical scholarship, as well as contemporary culture. Although portraits of Jesus as a white, blue-eyed prophet, messiah, or rabbi inform the popular imagination, these often reflect the social location and racial biases of Western biblical scholars and theologians. However, what if Jesus were Black, Latinx, Amerindian, Asian, or Jewish? How would our understanding of his life, ministry and message change? Why is ethnicity/race an essential category for rethinking Christology as well as for interrogating the intersection between religion, race, and power? Seeking to address these questions, this course will (1) critically engage sources from the New Testament, art, film and media; (2) interrogate the racial reconstructions of Western biblical scholarship as well as contemporary cultural appropriations; and (3) map the implications of a racialized Jesus for marginalized communities in the United States. Key themes informing this course include race/ethnicity, colonialism, Third Reich Christology, civil rights, Black Lives Matter, fundamentalism and immigration, [15 max enrollment]

GOSPEL OF JOHN (NTSP-2260)

Credits:1

THE GOSPEL OF JOHN AS RESOURCE FOR SPIRITUALITY, THEOLOGY, AND MINISTRY This course is intended to help students gain competent access to the riches of the Fourth Gospel (John) as a resource for spirituality (experience of God), theology (thinking coherently about God), and ministry (fostering the Reign of God in this world). Because it is a short, intensive course the approach will necessarily be selective and will require considerable independent work by the students. Attendance at all class meetings is required (class material will not be available on line or in print because personal interaction is critical to the course process) as well as completion of assigned reading for each class. Class meets Fridays: 2/1, 2/8, 2/15, 2/22, 3/1.

OLD TESTAMENT FOUNDATIONS (OT-1065)

Credits:3

This course provides a basic overview of biblical material, starting “at the beginning” and concluding with the expulsion of Jews from the Jerusalem area in the year 135 C.E.

INTRODUCTION TO THE OT (OT-1070)

Credits:3

This course offers a critical introduction to the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible. Students will learn about the ancient Near Eastern context of the OT/HB, the history of ancient Israel, the different parts and books within the OT/HB, the processes from oral original to canonical books, different streams of tradition (theologies) within the OT/HB, etc. Evaluation method: classroom participation, several short exams, three short papers. [Auditors with faculty permission]

INTRO TO THE OLD TESTAMENT (OT-1076)

Credits:3

This course provides a survey of the Hebrew Bible, focusing on the texts in their historical and literary contexts. Students will learn to read the texts from various perspectives and evaluate the notion of the literature as sacred texts both for ancient readers as well as contemporary faith communities. Evaluation will be based on written assignments and class presentations. [Fall 2018: 30 max enrollment]

INTRODUCTION TO OLD TESTAMENT (OT-1080)

Credits:3

This course will provide a basic introduction to the study and message of the OT. The successful student will have 1) acquired a socio-cultural and theological overview of the Old Testament with foci on basic content as well as critical issues and exegetical and hermeneutical methodologies; 2) developed a self-awareness concerning his/her own social location and its relationship to the reading, thinking, and doing of biblical, historical, and theological work.

THE TALKING BOOK: THE HEBREW BIBLE AND BLACK CULTURE (OT-2057)

Credits:3

This course will explore the reception history of the Hebrew Bible in Black communities, particularly in the 20th and 21st century. The course will ask students to exegete texts that have had substantial influence in the Black communities and then evaluate literature, film, and music’s engagement of the biblical corpus. [20 max enrollment]

METHODS:PENTATEUCH & HISTORIES (OT-2095)

Credits:3

A socio-historical and literary survey of the Pentateuch and Histories with attention to the effects of culture upon both the composition and reception of these writings in faith communities. The course provides a foundation in critical methodologies and in the theory and practice of exegesis. In addition, we will wrestle with pastoral dimensions of our study - i.e. what is the relationship of these biblical criticisms to the kinds of interpretations made of the Bible in pastoral places outside the academy; what kinds of ethical, social, and ideological impact does the Bible and its interpretation have in our world? [Faculty Consent required; Auditors with faculty permission]

OLD TESTAMENT EXEGESIS (OT-3275)

Credits:3

RUTH: This seminar surveys and discusses recent literary approaches to the book of Ruth from the late 20th century until now. The introduction of the course deals with conventional questions such as place and date of composition, and political, sociological, and theological features of the narrative. The remaining of the course focuses on literary interpretations of the text with attention to the various methods and approaches used to examine the Ruth story.

LITERARY CRITICISM & THE OT (OT-4000)

Credits:3

A survey of the history of literary criticism and an overview of modern literary theory itself, with special attention to its various systems and approaches. An examination of methods for biblical study that have developed with reference to these literary approaches. An examination of how these methods are applied in the criticism of actual biblical texts. [Faculty Consent; 12 max enrollment]

OLD TESTAMENT PROPHETS (OT-4420)

Credits:3

An investigation of the historical, compositional, and literary dimensions of the prophetic books of the Hebrew Bible. An exploration of how the message of the biblical prophets integrates the theological traditions of the past with the distinctive socio-cultural realities of their own context. Central to these investigations will be our study of these biblical texts in conjunction with relevant outside readings as well as contemporary ministerial issues and challenges with which they intersect [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment]

WOMEN IN DEUTERONOM. HISTORY (OT-4462)

Credits:3

This course studies the Dueteronomistic History with particular focus on the stories of women in the texts and how they may be interpreted by contemporary audiences. Socio-historical research will be used to elaborate upon the context of women within these narratives, providing grounding for the consideration of what alternative readings are possible when a feminist critical lens is applied to the text. This course is taught by PhD student Sarah Kohles with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Gina Hens-Piazza.

INTRODUCTION TO OT (OT-8174)

Credits:3

This course will provide a basic online introduction to the study and message of the OT. The successful student will have 1) acquired a socio-cultural and theological overview of the Old Testament with foci on basic content as well as critical issues and exegetical and hermeneutical methodologies; 2) developed a self-awareness concerning his/her own social location and its relationship to the reading, thinking, and doing of biblical, historical, and theological work.

INTRO TO THE OLD TESTAMENT (OT-8175)

Credits:3

This course provides a survey of the Hebrew Bible, focusing on the texts in their historical and literary contexts. Students will learn to read the texts from various perspectives and evaluate the notion of the literature as sacred texts both for ancient readers as well as contemporary faith communities. Evaluation will be based on written assignments and class presentations.

WOMEN:BIB PRTRTS & CONT MNSTRY (OTRS-8230)

Credits:3

Women: Biblical Portraits and Issues in Ministry: (a Hybrid cs one-line and three Saturdays) This course considers biblical traditions focused upon women in conjunction with ministerial issues that relate specifically to women. It explores how these biblical accounts might inform our understanding and respond to these ministerial challenges. It also considers how these contemporary ministerial challenges illuminate our interpretation of these stories. [Foundation courses in OT; Faculty Consent required; 12 max enrollment]

GENERAL ETHICS (PH-1008)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to the philosophical study of ethics, focusing on key ethical questions (e.g., how we are to live, what we are obliged or permitted to do, etc.) and concepts (virtue, happiness, obligation, the good, and so forth). Through a careful reading of great philosophical works in the western tradition, important ethical theories will be presented within their historical context, including utilitarianism or consequentialism, deontological ethics, virtue theory, and natural law. Class discussion will center on the philosophical merit of these ethical approaches as well as their relevance to contemporary issues. Lecture/discussion format. Student evaluation will be based on class participation, two short written essays, and a final exam. Intended audience: MA, MTS, and MDiv. students.

PHILOSOPHY OF NATURE (PH-1056)

Credits:3

A philosophical account of the nature of change, exploring classical insights (Aristotle, Aquinas) and contemporary issues in cosmology, the methods of empirical science and philosophy, the nature of causality, time, infinity. Lecture/discussion. Fifteen-twenty page research paper, or three 4-5 page essay papers on assigned topics. [MA/MTS, MDiv]

THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE (PH-1065)

Credits:3

This is a hybrid course that combines online and in-class teaching. Assignments include a midterm and final exam. This course will examine what knowledge is, as well as epistemological concepts like truth and justification, and questions like skepticism and evidence. We will meet weekly to discuss the online lecture that will be previously delivered electronically. Although this is an introductory course, some familiarity with the Thomistic philosophical tradition, in particular philosophical anthropology, will be helpful. [Auditors excluded]

ARISTOTELIAN LOGIC (PH-1115)

Credits:3

This course focuses on the fundamental principles and techniques of classical logic first articulated in Aristotle's Organon and further developed by ancient, medieval, and modern thinkers. The course is loosely organized around the traditional distinction of the three operations of the mind: simple apprehension, judgment, and reasoning. The course will include an examination of logical fallacies and a brief excursus into modern symbolic logic. Lecture/discussion. Student evaluation will be based on class participation (logical problem sets and discussion of Aristotle/commentaries) and three exams. Intended audience: MDiv, MA/MTS. [15 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

PHILOSOPHICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (PH-2040)

Credits:3

An examination of Aristotelian and Thomistic understandings of soul, life, sensation, intellect, will, and the processes of cognition and choice. Philosophical issues in human conception and evolution. Unity of the human person, mind-brain and body-soul dualisms. Lecture/discussion, fifteen-twenty page research paper, or three 4-5 page essay papers on assigned topics. MA/MTS, MDiv. [PH 1056-Philosophy of Nature or equivalent]

METAPHYSICS (PH-2050)

Credits:3

This course presents a comprehensive introduction to Aristotelian-Thomistic metaphysics. This is a hybrid course that combines online teaching and in-class meetings. A weekly online lecture will be delivered electronically before our class meeting. Assignments include a midterm and a final paper. It is recommended some familiarity with Aristotelian-Thomistic philosophy, and having taken some basic introductory courses like Philosophy of Nature before taking this course. [Auditors excluded]

TWENTIETH CENTURY THOMISM (PH-4011)

Credits:3

This course is intended for those who already have some familiarity with the thought of St. Thomas Aquinas, studying the contemporary Thomist revival inspired by Pope Leo XIII's encyclical, Aeterni Patris. The course will be conducted in seminar style and will focus on the engagement and development of the thought of St. Thomas by key figures such as Maritain, Gilson, Simon, Pieper, Clark, DeKoninck and McInerny. The class will cover such topics as the Thomistic response to post-Kantian critical philosophy, the idea of a Christian philosophy, and Thomistic contributions to aesthetics, the philosophy of science, and theories of ethical obligation and language. Student evaluation will be based on class participation, class presentations, and a final 15-20 page research paper. Intended Audience: MA and PhD students. [Faculty Consent required]

THOMAS AQUINAS ON TRUTH (PH-4211)

Credits:3

This course will teach the basis for truth in philosophy of Thomas Aquinas. Students (MA/MTS, PhD/ThD) will undertake a careful, critical reading of his QD DeVeritate, a seminal work that covers a wide range of topics. The seminar method will be employed students having read a pre-assigned portion of the text both to understand its meaning and to serve as a springboard for ones own thought, will be expected to enter into a discussion. The Latin Leonine text of Thomas will be used for those fluent in Latin, but knowledge of Latin is not essential for this course. Assessment: 3 short essay papers (6-8 pgs)25% and a final term paper on an approved topic 75%

M. HEIDEGGER'S BEING AND TIME (PH-4385)

Credits:3

In this seminar we will read and come to understand one of the most seminal philosophical texts of the twentieth century, Heidegger's Being and Time. We will explore Heidegger's background in Aristotelian and Christian thought, as well as in the tradition of Phenomenology, and how he transforms these influences programmatically in his work. This exploration will include some texts from Heidegger's earlier lectures, as far as they are available in English. We will also look at one or two texts from his later writings, to get a sense of his overall development. Seminar, research paper and class presentation; MA/MTS, PhD/ThD; [Faculty Consent required; Auditors excluded]

PHENOMENOLOGY OF THE OTHER (PH-4445)

Credits:3

By engaging the works of phenomenologists such as Husserl, Stein, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, Levinas, Derrida, and Marion, this course will examine the topic of intersubjectivity and the role of the other in the constitution of meaning, objectivity, self-identity, and moral obligation. Student evaluation will be based on preparation of assigned class readings, participation in class discussion, a class presentation, and a final research paper. For students in the M.A./M.T.S. and Ph.D./Th.D. programs. [Faculty Consent required; 12 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

PHENOMENOLOGY (PH-4446)

Credits:3

This course is designed as a high-level introduction to phenomenology through a detailed examination of its key themes and topics, including phenomenological method, intentionality, time-consciousness, self-awareness, judgment, intersubjectivity, emotions and volition. To achieve this, students will read and discuss selections from key texts in the phenomenological tradition, including selections from Husserl, Heidegger, Stein, Scheler, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty and Ricoeur. Class format: seminar. Student evaluation will be based on class participation, class presentations, and a final 15-20 page research paper.

MIND AND BRAIN (PH-4711)

Credits:3

This course examines the main theories that explain how the mind and the body relate, and whether the mind can be reduced to its biological basis. It critically appraises dualism and materialism and puts forward an alternative solution with a hylomorphic understanding of the mental and the physical. This is an hybrid course that comprises an online lecture and an in-class discussion. A weekly lecture will be delivered electronically before our class discussion. Assignments include paper reviews, student presentations and final exam. This is an advanced course and familiarity of basic philosophical concepts is recommended. [Auditors excluded]

PERSON AND NEUROSCIENCE (PH-4712)

Credits:3

This course is part of DSPT's triennial Philosophy Project on Person and Consciousness in its third semester. This course will examine what the findings of Neuroscience mean for our understanding of personhood, in particular questions of free will, decision making, personal identity, and consciousness. Invited speakers will present on some of the topics. Assignments include student presentations, paper reviews and paper research. [Auditors excluded]

SELF & OTHER IN INDIAN THOUGHT (PHCE-2502)

Credits:3

"Who am I?" "Should I care?" The orthodox literature of India (across theology, philosophy, ethics to anthropology) record a variety of competing ideas about the self, its nature, and the related question of personal identity as also how one cares for one's self. Tradition has grappled with these issues against much adverse criticism from alternative views , e.g. by materialists, Jains and Buddhist in the attempt to forge a coherent view of the self and a consequent morality. Earlier, there was some ambivalence in the Vedic canons and subsequent systems where the possibility of universal 'non-being' as becoming threatened the supposed stability of purusha (personhood, including devas or 'light-beings'). So what would sustain right action, good and virtuous life? Would the lure of rituals and divine rewards suffice? Not until the emergence of the conception of Atman – as Transcendental Self – with the Upanishad (Vedanta) that a stable unitary metaphysics with correlate ethics is settled upon. But this view generates problem for the mundane experiential self, its consciousness and individual identity: who or what is the "I" in our waking life, in dreams; and what of the ethical responsibilities of the self on the ground, to the other selves or beings? The course draws on hermeneutics of texts, from ancient, classical, epic-medieval to modern and critical Indian discourses on self, no-self, selflessness, personal identity, intrinsic and contingent self, self as Divine, Atman as nondual Brahman, or as related to other ontologies (e.g. panentheism, dualism, naturalism), and the moral implications thereto. The horizons of the self as a moral, aesthetic and spiritual or yogic being in relation to the community and the world is engagingly examined. There will be comparative attention paid to Western and interreligious history of ideas and also to contemporary psychology and postsecular theories.

BIOETHICS AND PERSON (PHCE-4010)

Credits:3

Technological innovation and the development of new biomedical technology has in recent years been the source of new complex and challenging ethical issues and questions. This seminar addresses these ethical questions and examines their relation to consciousness and personal identity. Using the resources of the western philosophical tradition, especially the thought of St. Thomas Aquinas, students will examine such issues as brain death and the end of life, the moral status of the unborn and persons in persistent vegetative states (PVS), the humane treatment of animals, the limits of genetic intervention and cloning, artificial enhancement and technological manipulation of the human body (transhumanism). This seminar course is required for students participating in the Philosophy Project on person, soul, and consciousness and is intended for M.A. and Ph.D students. Student evaluation will be based on class participation, class presentations, and a final 15-20 page research paper. [Faculty Consent required; Auditors with faculty permission]

NATURAL LAW (PHCE-4012)

Credits:3

This seminar will examine the concept of natural law in Aquinas and its development in several contemporary authors (particularly Jean Porter); it will address the following major issues, among others: the relation of natural law to Christian revelation and to the acquired and infused virtues; the relation of reason to natural structure and inclination ("natural law" to "laws of nature");" the transition between human "well being" (a factual state) and human "happiness" (a moral state); and the sources of moral obligation. Are the roots of natural law in reason or revelation or both? Is morality "underdetermined" by human nature? What role could and should natural law play in Christian ethics? Is there an unbridgeable gulf between the "is" and the "ought?" The goal of the seminar is to give the participants the opportunity to think through the foundations of moral living (in both the natural and supernatural orders) in the tradition of Aquinas. Requirements are class attendance and two ten page essays. Students who take this course must have completed a course in fundamental moral theology in the Roman Catholic tradition; students in any degree program are welcome. [Faculty Consent required; 6 max enrollment]

THEORIES OF JUSTICE (PHCE-6005)

Credits:3

This seminar will offer critical analysis of differing theories of justice in philosophical and theological discourses. The seminar is intended primarily, but not exclusively, for PhD and STD students. Pre-requisites for the course are 6 credits in graduate studies of either moral theology or philosophy.

HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY:ANCIENT (PHHS-1050)

Credits:3

This course will present the history of Greek philosophy from the pre-Socratics to Pseudo-Dionysius. The emphasis will be on Plato and Aristotle. Format: lecture/discussion. Evaluation: class participation, midterm, final. Intended audience: MDiv, MA/MTS. [Auditors with faculty permission]

HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY:MEDIEVAL (PHHS-1051)

Credits:3

This course will focus principally on the development of Christian philosophical theology, emphasizing: Patristic Roots (to 1100), Scholastic Synthesis (1200 to 1325), and Nominalist Critique (1325-1450). Attention will also be given to the reception of Greek, Arab and Jewish learning by the medieval west. Anselm of Canterbury, Bonaventure, Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus, and William of Occam will receive special attention. Students will be expected to interpret and discuss such texts orally (proved by participation in class discussions) and analyze and interpret them in writing (proved by written examinations). [25 max enrollment]

HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY: MODERN (PHHS-2000)

Credits:3

The class will give an overview over the development of Western philosophy from Descartes and Bacon to Schopenhauer. This will include Continental Rationalism, British Empiricism, Kant and German Idealism. Lecture/discussion. There will be a short mid-term and final exam (non-comprehensive) and a term paper. (MDiv, MA/MTS, PhD/ThD).

CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY (PHHS-2001)

Credits:3

Lecture on late 19th and 20th century philosophy: beginning with Kierkegaard and Nietzsche, we will treat pragmatism, phenomenology, existentialism, hermeneutics, analytic philosophy, structuralism, postmodernism, deconstruction and leading criticism of the same. The lecture is designed to give an overview and is open to questions and discussion. Lecture/discussion. There will be a short mid-term and final exam (non-comprehensive) and a term paper. (MDiv, MA/MTS, PhD/ThD)

PLATO'S POLITICAL THOUGHT (PHHS-4022)

Credits:3

The purpose of this course is to present a comprehensive introduction to Plato's political thought. It will begin with reading of selections from Aristotle's Ethics and Politics to get a point of comparison, and then proceed with close, careful reading of the Republic, Statesman, and Laws. Format: Seminar. Grading: Seminar participation, in-class presentations, 15-20 page research paper. Intended audience: MA (Phil); PhD. [Faculty Consent required; 12 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

HEGEL'S HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY (PHHS-4394)

Credits:3

Hegel was a historical thinker; consequently, he was convinced that we cannot think without understanding the history of thought and our location in it. We are going to read his Lectures on the History of Philosophy (NB: this is not his Philosophy of History!) – a great way of reviewing the history of philosophy with one of its greatest minds. Seminar. Class presentations and 15-20 page research paper. (MA/MTS, PhD/ThD) [15 max enrollment]

HINDU PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION (PHST-2100)

Credits:3

A Hermeneutical Approach. Philosophy of Religion in the West has focused on proving (or disproving) the existence and nature of God, and accounting for the persistence of evil or "sin" in the world. This tension arises from claims based on faith and scripture over the judgment of reason and science. However, negligible attention has been paid cross-culturally to other great civilizations and their theologies, doctrines, and symbolic patterns that might be seen to respond differently to the parallel ultimate concerns. The course attempts to redress this imbalance by engaging the Hindu tradition in a comparative inquiry on the "Big Questions." We approach classical Hindu texts with a hermeneutic lens to examine how they have resolved philosophical paradoxes, such as the conundrums of existence and non-existence, self and no-self, meaning of life over nothingness, the spiritual versus secular social arrangements, fate over liberation, as well as the labyrinths and best paths toward these ends. So there are (de)constructive reading of "atman (self) = Brahman" as the universal Self, dharma as duty, du?kha as suffering, karma as the principle of moral justice, and values or virtues such as compassion, moral care, non-injury, intellectual excellence, and the aesthetics of grief and joy, etc. The course ends with examining developments of the themes in modern times in the applied context of nationalism, Gandhi's philosophy of satyagraha and nonviolence, sustainable environmental movements, bioethics and biotechnology.

MIRACLES (PHST-4020)

Credits:3

Miracles are a key topic of the philosophy of religion. Are they possible? And if yes, can we know that they have occurred? Answering these questions involves a range of philosophical and theological topics, such as: what is a law of nature? what is the nature of causality? It requires answering questions about probability, epistemology, metaphysics and historiography. The freedom of God and petitionary prayer, the possibility of revelation and its relation to reason – all these will have to play a role. Numerous philosophers and theologians have contributed to the debate, especially since D. Hume. We will engage selected texts of this ongoing conversation. Seminar; Class presentations and 15-20 page research paper. MA/MTS; PhD/ThD. [15 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

THE MASTERS OF SUSPICION (PHST-4380)

Credits:3

THE MASTERS OF SUSPICION: MARX, NIETZSCHE, AND FREUD This course will provide an in-depth examination of the thought of Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Sigmund Freud. A close reading of key texts will provide the basis for appreciating the thought of these "masters of suspicion" on their own terms, while, more particularly, interrogating their hermeneutic strategies and critique of Christianity/religion. Seminar format. Course evaluation will be based on class presentations and participation, as well as a 15-20 page research paper. [Faculty Consent required; 12 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

THOMAS ON SUBSTANCE (PHST-4500)

Credits:3

Thomas Aquinas holds substance is the most important of the Aristotelian categories. Matter/form, essence, material beings, angels and God can, in some way, be called substance. This course will examine Thomas's account of substance and relevant metaphysical themes (e.g., essence/esse, analogy, subsistence, hypostasis, science, and definition) to argue for a consistent and coherent synthesis of Thomas's account of substance across the sciences of logic, natural philosophy, and metaphysics. Reading knowledge of Latin strongly encouraged. Format: Seminar discussion/lecture. Prerequisite: some course in Thomistic Philosophy of Nature or Thomistic Metaphysics. Evaluation: class participation, 15-20 page research paper. Intended audience: MA, PhD/ThD. [Faculty Consent required; 12 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

INTRO TO PASTORAL THEOLOGY (PS-1010)

Credits:3

This is a basic course with focus on practical application in pastoral ministry based on sound pastoral theological understanding. It will explore all the areas in congregational life in which pastoral ministry might be needed. Based on lectures, readings and conversations, students will be required to develop the appropriate response in certain situations using preaching skills, counseling, and other forms of pastoral ministry. We will also look at the restrictions under which counseling can take place or is required as directed by national or diocesan church canons. Based on role-playing, written reflections and classroom participation students will be graded on a letter grade basis. This course is intended for M.Div and MA/MTS students. [Auditors excluded]

INTRODUCTION TO PASTORAL CARE (PS-1014)

Credits:3

This is an introductory course in the important ministry of pastoral care and counseling. It is designed to introduce the M.Div. student to the basic concepts, dynamics, issues and skills necessary for effective pastoral care. This course will teach both theory and the skills of pastoral care. The course will include lectures and skill practice small groups. This course requirements include regular attendance, personal reflection papers, quizzes, and a final case study.

PASTORAL COUNSELING: PROCESS/SKILLS (PS-1016)

Credits:3

SECTION 1 [DSPT] This course introduces basic concepts, attitudes, and skills of pastoral counseling. Consideration is given to the fundamental process and skills of pastoral counseling to more effectively deal with common pastoral concerns and problems. It further covers professional ethics for pastoral ministers including issues such as boundaries, power differentials, confidentiality, and sexual misconduct. Systematic training and practice in basic responding and initiating skills are provided. Multicultural implications are included. Intended audience: MDiv, MA, MTS. _______________________________________________________________________________________ SECTION 2[JST] Highlighting pastoral case material and interpersonal process, the course introduces students to the basic interviewing skills of pastoral counseling and provides an overview of clinical psychopathology. This course understands psycho­logical distress within the context of pastoral counseling from a biopsychosocial and spiritual perspective. The challenges of trauma, addiction, and recovery are especially highlighted. Through interviewing and group facilitation, students will hopefully experience themselves as pastoral agents of healing. Taught from a clinical psychodynamic perspective with attention to professional ethics for pastoral ministers, direct experience with underserved populations is required – students will be offered short term pastoral opportunities with homeless populations recovering from trauma and/or addiction. These community engaged learning opportunities are scheduled for some late afternoons on Friday and/or two Saturdays during the semester. Intended audience: MDiv, MA, MTS

INTRO TO PASTORAL CARE/THEO I (PS-1026)

Credits:1.5

This is the first part of an introductory course in practices of care for ministry in communities of faith. In various ways over the full stretch of this course (including both PS 1026 and PS 1027), we will look at (1) aspects of human emotional/relational/spiritual need (2) as that is shaped by cultural values and societal power dynamics, and ask (3) how our theology listens to, critiques and revisions human need, cultural values and societal dynamics and (4) where that all leads us in terms of practices of care. In Week One (PS 1026) we will focus more on individuals’ need for care, especially in crises and everyday change involving loss. In Week Two (PS 1027) we will think more in terms of systemic understandings of congregations and families and cross-cultural perspectives, and how these insights can inform our patterns of care. Throughout we will maintain the emphasis on the communal and cultural context for our caring, raise the justice questions, and ask what hope and meaning faith provides. Format for Week One: lecture/discussion, student presentations of care-receivers’ stories, conversations to practice/model listening. Assignments include pre-course reading and an interview with a care-receiver; class presentation, and a post-course reflection paper. Course meets daily, 1/14/19-1/18/19, from 1:30pm-5:30pm at CDSP.

INTRO TO PASTORAL THEO/CARE II (PS-1027)

Credits:1.5

This is the second part of an introductory course in practices of care for ministry in communities of faith. In various ways over the full stretch of this course (including both PS 1026 and PS 1027), we will look at (1) aspects of human emotional/relational/spiritual need (2) as that is shaped by cultural values and societal power dynamics, and ask (3) how our theology listens to, critiques and revisions human need, cultural values and societal dynamics and (4) where that all leads us in terms of practices of care. In Week One (PS 1026) we will focus more on individuals’ need for care, especially in crises and everyday change involving loss. In Week Two (PS 1027) we will think more in terms of systemic understandings of congregations and families and cross-cultural perspectives, and how these insights can inform our patterns of care. Throughout we will maintain the emphasis on the communal and cultural context for our caring, raise the justice questions, and ask what hope and meaning faith provides. Format for Week Two: lecture/discussion, student presentations, conversations to practice/model listening. Assignments include pre-course reading, a ministry case study involving family or congregational dynamics, class presentation, and a post-course reflection paper. Class meets daily, 1/21/19-1/25/19, from 1:30pm to 5:30pm at CDSP. [PS 1026]

CONGREGATIONAL CARE (PS-1062)

Credits:3

This course will seek to (1) define and describe the art of pastoral care and counseling and the contexts in which it takes place; (2) explore the needs and dynamics of people seeking help, as well as the self-awareness and skills required of the person in ministry; (3) provide opportunities for the practice and development of spiritual caregiving skills, including basic skills of listening, assessment, connecting with others, and communication of caring and hope; and (4) foster an environment wherein participants can reflect theologically on the issues, contexts, and crises faced by people in need. Course format includes discussions, lectures, student presentations, and five (5) required hours of pastoral practice labs beyond scheduled lecture sessions. Evaluation will be based on class and lab session participation, reflection papers, a case study, and weekly reading quizzes. ABSW core course. [25 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

PASTORAL CARE I (PS-1145)

Credits:1.5

Part I of the Pastoral Care sequence. Theory and practice of pastoral care within diverse cultural and socio-economic contexts. Integration of biblical, theological, liturgical, spiritual, psychological, and sociological perspectives and resources. Emphasis on the application of family systems and family life cycle theory to self, pastoral care in diverse contexts, and personal faith development. Role-playing, cases, films, lectures, small groups. This course is offered as a seven-week intensive starting the week of April 1, 2019 and ending the week of May 13, 2019. Meets Thursdays 9:40am-12:55pm. [30 max enrollment]

RITUAL DESIGN (PS-1461)

Credits:1

This is one part of a 3 module class of 1 credit units each. You must also register for Ritual Design and Communication to complete the course. As a required course in the Stackable Curriculum for MDiv students in their first year, it provides an introductory and hands on approach to leading religious communities. Each class will meet on Thursday afternoons for a total engagement of 4-5 weeks per module. This one unit module introduces the basic principles of Communication for first-year stackable curriculum students through an extended reflection on practices of "Communication" as a spiritual trait for leaders of communities involved with social justice and transformation. The course is organized around lectures and discussions, with the expectation of a research paper at the end. Students will engage with readings through personal reflections and regular writing and discussion exercises. Class meets 2/7/2019-3/7/2019.

COMMUNICATION (PS-1462)

Credits:1

This is one part of a 3 module class of 1 credit units each. You must also register for Ritual Design and Communication to complete the course. As a required course in the Stackable Curriculum for MDiv students in their first year, it provides an introductory and hands on approach to leading religious communities. Each class will meet on Thursday afternoons for a total engagement of 4-5 weeks per module. This one unit module introduces the basic principles of Communication for first-year stackable curriculum students through an extended reflection on practices of "Communication" as a spiritual trait for leaders of communities involved with social justice and transformation. The course is organized around lectures and discussions, with the expectation of a research paper at the end. Students will engage with readings through personal reflections and regular writing and discussion exercises. Class meets 3/14/2019-4/11/2019.

EMPATHY (PS-1463)

Credits:1

This is one part of a 3 module class of 1 credit units each. You must also register for Ritual Design and Communication to complete the course. As a required course in the Stackable Curriculum for MDiv students in their first year, it provides an introductory and hands on approach to leading religious communities. Each class will meet on Thursday afternoons for a total engagement of 4-5 weeks per module. This one unit module introduces the basic principles of Pastoral Care and Theology for first-year stackable curriculum students through an extended reflection on "Empathy" as a spiritual trait for leaders of communities involved with social justice and transformation. The course is organized around lectures and discussions, with the expectation of a research paper at the end. Students will engage with readings through personal reflections and regular writing and discussion exercises. Class meets 4/18/2019-5/23/2019.

C/PC CLINICAL PASTORAL ED (PS-2061)

Credits:0

The Pastoral Care Service Project provides a way to live out the Christian conviction that pastoral care is ultimately a theology of service. Out of involvement with persons in need, and feedback from peers and instructor, students develops new awareness of themselves as persons and of the needs of those they serve. From theological reflection on specific human situations, students gain a new understanding of pastoral care ministry. Participating student will choose one of the following (as available and with permission of service site administrator): (a) Assist the SFTS Chaplain or SFTS Professor of Pastoral Counseling by serving as the student chaplain on-call, reporting to both the Shaw Chair for CPE (for support and performance feedback) and the SFTS Chaplain or Professor of Pastoral Counseling (for administrative direction and performance feedback); or (b) A service mission directed by the Shaw Chair for CPE that may be on or off campus, public or hidden, and that stresses leadership and service. This service mission will directly engage care-giving with the disadvantaged and address structural issues which underlie unjust systems. Participants must commit themselves to the provision of pastoral care through the service project in order to receive credit. SFTS MDiv. C/PC Concentration students only. [Faculty Consent required; 8 max enrollment]

Pastoral Care in Transgender Commnities (PS-2951)

Credits:1.5

Pastoral Care in Transgender Communities - In progressive theological education and in the work of spiritually inclusive ministry we must create communities of care for all those who are differently gendered, in doing so we affirm the inherent worth and dignity of all people of all genders. Living into this spiritual imperative requires quality pastoral care for transgender and gender nonconforming individuals. This course addresses culturally relevant and diverse situations of care that are unique to transgender and gender nonconforming communities. This one week, 1.5 credit hour course, will address pastoral care and spiritual care in transgender communities, including those who are transgender, gender nonconforming, gender creative, genderqueer, agender, gender expansive, and others with a variety of non-normative gender identities; as well as their families and communities that stand in solidarity with differently gendered people. This is an in-person, ground class. We will utilize in class discussion, Moodle, an optional after class excursion, and a final project as the pedagogical tools for this course.

PASTORAL CARE AND COUNSELING (PS-8250)

Credits:3

This course will be an online seminar conducted in Korean. The course is intended for MDiv & DMin students. Evaluation is based upon weekly quiz, reflection paper, and research paper. What is pastoral care and counseling? Who needs pastoral care and counseling? Why do we need pastoral care and counseling in this rapidly changing world where technology (such as intelligence agency and robotic science) seems to substitute human agency for healing and welfare? These questions will be carefully investigated and discussed, paying attention to different cultures, especially Korean communities. The history of pastoral care and counseling will be discussed in order to examine where we have come from, where we are now and where we need to go in the future. Basic skills, such as active listening, reflecting, empathy, and confrontation will be addressed in an effort to develop the necessary sensitivity, discernment, and courage to perform adequate, culturally sensitive pastoral care. [7 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

ILLNESS, HEALTH & HEALING (PS-8450)

Credits:3

This course invites students to listen for the voices of the ill, even when those voices are full of pain or have been long ignored. Students will develop spiritual care skills and practices to promote health and healing that will enhance their ministries and their lives. The course will draw from narrative medicine as well as scriptures and healing stories from a variety of religious traditions. Format: Class Discussion. Method of Evaluation: weekly reflections, spiritual practice exercises, and projects. Intended audience: M.Div., MASC, MA. This online course is asynchronous. Low residency. Relates to Threshold #: 5; 7; and 8 Relates to MFC Competencies #: 2; 3; and 6 [20 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

SPECIAL TOPICS (PSFT-9300)

Credits:1.5

FALL 2018 NEIGHBOR-CARE: DIVERSE CNTXTS The parable of the Good Samaritan defines "neighbor" as "one who is in need," and that understanding is affirmed theologically in many traditions. This course looks at applying pastoral care practices to diverse groups of neighbors, with particular attention given to LGBTQI, multi-racial and multi-generational communities. This is a seminar course that includes guest presentations, case studies, and discussions. Students are assessed through active participation, presentations and a final portfolio of resources. [Coursework in pastoral care required; 30 max enrollment]

BUDDHIST PASTORAL CARE I (PSHR-3076)

Credits:3

Buddhist teachings and practices have much to offer the world of pastoral care and chaplaincy. This course integrates Buddhist teachings into the study of pastoral care and counseling, and chaplaincy, and explores their relevance in an interfaith setting. Key aspects of pastoral care will be covered in conjunction with applicable Buddhist teachings and practices. Psychological principles which are central to contemporary pastoral care will be included as well as specific topics such as family life and transitions, illness, addiction, trauma, grief, and wider social considerations. Exercises and reflections aimed at developing self-awareness and the skills necessary for effective pastoral care will also be included. There are no prerequisites for this course. Course format: seminar/lecture/discussion; Method of Evaluation: class participation/weekly reflection papers/ final paper. Intended audience: MA/MDiv/MTS. DMin/PhD/ThD with additional requirements. [20 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

INTERCULTURAL MINISTRY: PARISH, CAMPUS (PSRS-2010)

Credits:3

Multiethnic parishes, campuses, and classrooms have become the “new normal” in the U.S. Catholic Church– one-third of parishes are now “shared parishes” composed of culturally diverse communities sharing the same space; more than half of college and high school students do not fit the traditional profile in terms of race, ethnicity, or socio-economic status; and faith communities are receiving a significant influx of international pastoral agents. While in the past, skills in interculturality might have been seen as optional, now they are required for all who minister in the U.S. Catholic Church. This intensive seminar, designed for ministers working in parish, campus ministry, or classroom settings and taught by a missiologist who has written on culture-sensitive ministry, engages recent research, art, case studies, and theological reflection to better equip them to work interculturally. Among the key learning activities will be a preliminary site visit prior to the course (suggestions will be provided), readings to be completed before the course, as well as presentations of best practices by practitioners. A final paper or project will serve as a capstone for future exploration and application. Auditors who do the readings, along with students upgrading, are welcome. Class meets: Sunday, 1/20/2019, 1:00pm-5:00pm; Monday-Wednesday, 1/21/2019-1/23/2019, 8:00a-5:00pm; and Saturday, 2/16/2019, 8:00am-5:00pm; at JST 216.

MINISTRY IN TIMES OF DISASTER (PSRS-2300)

Credits:3

Class is co-taught by Rosemary Bray McNatt and Linda Ramsden. In times of communal crisis, people of faith are called to minister throughout the life cycle of a disaster. In addition to offering spiritual first aid and disaster response, faith communities are joining with grassroots organizations to advocate for a "just recovery” that is more equitable, resilient and sustainable. Whether communities suffer from hurricanes, floods, or wildfires, police violence, civil uprisings or mass shootings, entrenched systems of oppression and power impact who is harmed and how severely, as well as whose lives, visions, and values are centered during recovery and rebuilding. This class combines two three-day weekend intensives at SKSM along with asynchronous on-line study and reflection. Students will receive the National Organization for Victim Assistance (NOVA) Crisis Response Team Training during the first weekend intensive. The second weekend includes a local field trip to learn from communities recovering from wildfire disaster in this era of climate disruption. On-line study will include readings, video, audio, worship resources and an opportunity to interview clergy whose ministry was impacted by a disaster. Relates to SKSM Thresholds 2 & 5 and MFC Competencies 2, 4 & 7. Evaluation will be based on familiarity with assigned reading, class participation, role play scenarios and written work. Prerequisites: Educating to Counter Oppressions (or equivalent with faculty permission). Registration: Class is open to students on any degree track. A limited number of community auditors may register with faculty permission. [18 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission] Schedule: 1) Orientation Zoom call for the whole class, 2/7/2019, 5:30pm-7:00pm Pacific Time. https://zoom.us/j/8103527466 2) Intensives at SKSM: 3/29/2019-3/31/2019 and 4/26/2019-4/28/2019; Fridays 10:00am-6:00pm; Saturdays 9:00am-5:00pm (Field trip may impact ending time on 4/27); Sundays 9:00am-5:00pm. 3) Asynchronous on-line work

HINDU THEOLOGY OF ONENESS (PTBS-5100)

Credits:3

This course will give an overview of one of the most ancient philosophical traditions. In the Hindu tradition, known as Advaita Vedanta, the aim is the study of oneself as the whole, as non-separate from the world, and from God. This integrative vision is systematically expounded in the sacred texts known as the Upanishads, which form the last portion of the primary canonical, revealed scriptures, known as the Vedas. In this course, we will study key portions of several of the prominent Upanishads and the Bhagavad Gita with a view to gaining an in-depth understanding of the vision of non-duality, especially as it pertains to the pedagogy of self-knowledge, and its relationship to concepts of bondage, liberation and the various orders of reality. We will be aided in our study by writings of Adi Shankara, the famous 8th C philosopher monk, whose writings unfold the vision of oneness in a systematic and creative manner. Additionally, the course will be raising salient questions such as: What is the nature bondage? Is it universally experienced? How can the understanding of oneness resolve the notion of bondage? How can oneness be communicated or taught, considering that the teaching situation itself poses a duality? How might the pedagogies of self-knowledge be useful in one’s daily life?

AUGUSTINE: PSYCHE IN CREATION (PTPS-4200)

Credits:3

looking at various elements of St. Augustine's theological anthropology (his understanding of memory, the Trinitarian structure of the psyche, the will...etc.), this class will explore the dialogue between this view of the human person and the one developed in the depth psychological tradition, specifically focusing on the work of Carl Jung, connecting these two thinkers through their common ground in the Neoplatonic anthropology. Grounding the theological anthropology in the context of Augustine's doctrine of creation, this class will explore how this view of the human person can work toward healing the fundamental bifurcation between humanity and nature, a false dualism said to lie at the heart of many societal ills stemming from modernity. In this way, we will examine how concerns raised by ecofeminist thinkers about the view of subjectivity inherited from the western tradition can be respectfully addressed by building blocks from that same tradition, working toward healing it from within. This course is taught by PhD student Gordon Gilmore with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Thomas Cattoi. [10 max enrollment; Faculty Consent required; Auditors with faculty permission]

A CRY FOR JUSTICE IN HYMNODY (RA-0013)

Credits:0

Course is co-taught by Rev. Nancy E. Hall & Rev. Dan Damon. Students will develop their knowledge of hymnody and deepen their awareness of the social issues of our time and how to motivate change through the song of the church. We will look for the best and most singable congregational songs in all musical styles as we develop a sense of how to choose songs and hymns for authentic worship while making use of the resources of recent denominational hymnals. Included in this course will be the many justice hymns of Daniel Charles Damon. This course is appropriate for masters level students.

ART AND SYMBOLIC PROCESS (RA-0016)

Credits:0

"When the Soul wants to experience something she throws out an image in front of her and then steps into it." Meister Eckhart. The course Art and Symbolic Process explores archetypal symbols (such as the circle, cross, spiral, and triangle) and personal symbols with a focus on accessing and articulating the multi-layered levels of meaning and transformation inherent in our relationship with their spiritual and material expression. Through individual and group creative practices, each student creates a unique body of artwork in response to a personal symbol, revealing deepening information relevant to the individual. Research and reflective writing regarding the metaphorical significance of symbols, cross-culturally and historically, allows a deeper investigation into the function, nature and power of symbols to guide one’s life and unfolding spiritual journey.

IMAGINING RESISTANCE (RA-0017)

Credits:0

Imaging Resistance: Art, Religion, and Activism for the 21st Century. How have visual artists and theologians responded to times of cultural instability and unrest? This course surveys how artistic and religious movements in the past four decades have modeled combative strategies for living in times of instability. Each week, we will take a close look at a particular art movement such as outsider, Black, chicanx, feminist, indigenous, queer, and eco-art coupled with readings in theologies of resistance. The objective of this course is twofold: to learn about how art and religion have generated praxes of emancipation; to examine the visual production that emerges from these revolutionary movements so as to assess how art and religion have been catalysts of transformation.

CONTEMPLATIVE DRAWING (RA-0018)

Credits:0

Drawing as a Contemplative Process. "The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes." Marcel Proust. From the beginning of human history the act of drawing has been a practice by which the world may be explored, rediscovered, and made new. Practicing contemplative drawing is a meditative art, an act of centering in the self and in the present moment. Students will examine the cross-cultural history of drawing from the prehistoric to the contemporary world while engaging in drawing exercises that allow their eyes, hands, and hearts to be translators between the inner world and the outer world. Through a series of accessible traditional and non-traditional drawing exercises, such as blind contour drawing, pattern drawing, working with rhythm, drawing from nature, and exploring darkness and light, students will deepen their relationship to the interconnection between embodied and transcendent experience.

ART AS SPIRITUAL PRACTICE (RA-0019)

Credits:0

“A thinker is very much like a draughtsman whose aim it is to represent all the interrelations between things”. -Ludwig Wittgenstein Culture and Value. This course is an exploration of visual art forms and their cultural and spiritual connections. It includes a study of art history and the elements, media and methods used in creative thought and processes. In this course you will learn how to analyze works of art and understand the processes involved in artistic production; identifying the political, social, cultural, spiritual and aesthetic issues that add meaning to a work of art. Through lectures, gallery and studio visits, discussions, readings and hands-on exercises, we will examine a range of ideas from the concepts of Sacred Geometry to the thought provoking work of Tim In-gold’s anthropology of lines. This course will bring us to a better understanding of the society and culture we have inherited and our hopes for the future.

VISUAL ARTS AND RELIGION (RA-1156)

Credits:3

This a three-credit hour face to face introductory lecture course which explores the ways in which people across time and space visualized their religious beliefs. Besides having a large temporal span from the third to the twentieth century, the material in the course covers also a wide geographical area—from the Near East to North America, and from the Netherlands to Ethiopia. The course satisfies the art requirement for MDiv candidates.

CHORALE (RA-1700)

Credits:1.5

Students explore the role of music in worship and in the life of faith through rehearsing music from a variety of cultures and stylistic periods and singing in worship services. The course emphasizes vocal development, theological reflection, building community through music, and music as a spiritual practice. Meets Mondays 6:40-9:30pm and Tuesdays 10:10am -12:00pm in the PSR Chapel. PSR community members encouraged to join. Open to the general public without registration.

SEMINARY SINGERS (RA-1709)

Credits:1

Learning and performing various pieces of sacred music in the SFTS choir. Pass/Fail only

SCHOLA CANTORUM (RA-1715)

Credits:1

The preparation and offering of liturgical music provides students with a broader understanding of the history and practice of sacred music in contemporary context. Schola Cantorum regularly sings for the CDSP Community Eucharist on Thursday evenings at 5:45pm. May be repeated for credit. PLEASE NOTE: The Schola Cantorum rehearses from 1:00-2:00pm on Thursday afternoons in the CDSP Chapel. The group meets again at 5:30pm for the 5:45pm Eucharist in the CDSP Chapel.

GALLERY EXHIBITION PRACTICUM (RA-1806)

Credits:1.5

This art exhibition practicum offers hands-on experience organizing the annual Bay Area MFA Show in the Doug Adams Gallery, an exhibition of work by Bay Area Master of Fine Arts students from schools around the Bay Area. Students will work individually and collaboratively in small groups on all aspects of the exhibition, from preparing publicity materials to configuring the exhibition layout and working with a professional art installer. The course also addresses related issues such as collaborative exhibition planning, visitor outreach and exhibition design through weekly readings and discussions.

LITURGICAL MUSIC RESOURCES (RA-1920)

Credits:3

The course will introduce students to the vast repertoire of hymns, service music, and other musical resources available for worship today. Using numerous hymnal resources, as well as historical and contemporary written materials, students will begin to encounter the vast and diverse musical styles afforded to the church from composers and authors, past and present. In engaging and expanding repertoire, students will "sing psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, and singing and making melody to the Lord" in their hearts.

A CRY FOR JUSTICE IN HYMNODY (RA-2055)

Credits:1.5

Course is co-taught by Dr. Nancy E. Hall & Rev. Dan Damon. Students will develop their knowledge of hymnody and deepen their awareness of the social issues of our time and how to motivate change through the song of the church. We will look for the best and most singable congregational songs in all musical styles as we develop a sense of how to choose songs and hymns for authentic worship while making use of the resources of recent denominational hymnals. Included in this course will be the many justice hymns of Daniel Charles Damon. This course is appropriate for masters level students.

ART & SYMBOLIC PROCESS (RA-2057)

Credits:1.5

"When the Soul wants to experience something she throws out an image in front of her and then steps into it." Meister Eckhart. The course Art and Symbolic Process explores archetypal symbols (such as the circle, cross, spiral, and triangle) and personal symbols with a focus on accessing and articulating the multi-layered levels of meaning and transformation inherent in our relationship with their spiritual and material expression. Through individual and group creative practices, each student creates a unique body of artwork in response to a personal symbol, revealing deepening information relevant to the individual. Research and reflective writing regarding the metaphorical significance of symbols, cross-culturally and historically, allows a deeper investigation into the function, nature and power of symbols to guide one’s life and unfolding spiritual journey.

CONTEMPLATIVE DRAWING (RA-2058)

Credits:1.5

Drawing as a Contemplative Process. "The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes." Marcel Proust. From the beginning of human history the act of drawing has been a practice by which the world may be explored, rediscovered, and made new. Practicing contemplative drawing is a meditative art, an act of centering in the self and in the present moment. Students will examine the cross-cultural history of drawing from the prehistoric to the contemporary world while engaging in drawing exercises that allow their eyes, hands, and hearts to be translators between the inner world and the outer world. Through a series of accessible traditional and non-traditional drawing exercises, such as blind contour drawing, pattern drawing, working with rhythm, drawing from nature, and exploring darkness and light, students will deepen their relationship to the interconnection between embodied and transcendent experience.

ART AS SPIRITUAL PRACTICE (RA-2350)

Credits:3

“A thinker is very much like a draughtsman whose aim it is to represent all the interrelations between things”. -Ludwig Wittgenstein Culture and Value. This course is an exploration of visual art forms and their cultural and spiritual connections. It includes a study of art history and the elements, media and methods used in creative thought and processes. In this course you will learn how to analyze works of art and understand the processes involved in artistic production; identifying the political, social, cultural, spiritual and aesthetic issues that add meaning to a work of art. Through lectures, gallery and studio visits, discussions, readings and hands-on exercises, we will examine a range of ideas from the concepts of Sacred Geometry to the thought provoking work of Tim In-gold’s anthropology of lines. This course will bring us to a better understanding of the society and culture we have inherited and our hopes for the future.

IMAGING RESISTANCE (RA-2358)

Credits:3

Imaging Resistance: Art, Religion, and Activism for the 21st Century. How have visual artists and theologians responded to times of cultural instability and unrest? This course surveys how artistic and religious movements in the past four decades have modeled combative strategies for living in times of instability. Each week, we will take a close look at a particular art movement such as outsider, Black, chicanx, feminist, indigenous, queer, and eco-art coupled with readings in theologies of resistance. The objective of this course is twofold: to learn about how art and religion have generated praxes of emancipation; to examine the visual production that emerges from these revolutionary movements so as to assess how art and religion have been catalysts of transformation.

TOLKIEN & THE VISUAL ARTS (RA-4945)

Credits:3

This course will map the relationships between religion, literature, and the visual arts through the lens of J.R.R. Tolkien's epic novel, The Lord of the Rings (1954). We will begin with a critical reading of Tolkien's texts, considering questions of intertextuality and influence, religion, mythography, cultural context, and belief. In conjunction with the readings, we will examine his little-known illustrations in the collection of the Bodleian Library, Oxford, and assess the compelling relationship between text and image. Using reception aesthetics as a critical approach, the second half of the course will investigate a wide variety of visual art that has evolved out of Tolkien's works, including Peter Jackson's blockbuster films. Major themes will include the legacy of 20th-century literature, the relationship between text and image, and the notion of the Catholic Imagination as conceived by Andrew Greeley, Wendy Wright, and others. Seminar format with film screenings and weekly reading assignments. Students will be evaluated through final research papers on an original topic of their choice (70% of final grade), class participation (10% of final grade), and an oral presentation (20% of final grade).

TOLKIEN - ART AND RELIGION (RA-4946)

Credits:3

This course will map the relationships between religion, literature, and the visual arts through the lens of J.R.R. Tolkien's epic novel, The Lord of the Rings (1954). We will begin with a critical reading of Tolkien's texts, considering questions of intertextuality and influence, religion, mythography, cultural context, and belief. In conjunction with the readings, we will examine his little-known illustrations in the collection of the Bodleian Library, Oxford, and assess the compelling relationship between text and image. Using reception aesthetics as a critical approach, the second half of the course will investigate a wide variety of visual art that has evolved out of Tolkien's works, including Peter Jackson's blockbuster films. Major themes will include the legacy of 20th-century literature, the relationship between text and image, and the notion of the Catholic Imagination as conceived by Andrew Greeley, Wendy Wright, and others. Seminar format with film screenings and weekly reading assignments. Students will be evaluated through final research papers on an original topic of their choice (70% of final grade), class participation (10% of final grade), and an oral presentation (20% of final grade). Course is jointly offered by JST and GTU. [12 max enrollment]

SACRED OBJECTS/SECULAR SPACES (RA-5100)

Credits:3

Most museums, explicitly or implicitly, deal with religion and spirituality. Museums exhibit objects considered holy, they serve as repositories for things that are held sacred, and they conserve and care for revered items. Using concepts from material culture theory, visual culture theory, museology, and allied fields, students will consider the role of religious objects and are in museums, galleries, and other secular spaces. This seminar, designed for PhD and advanced MA students, is based on reading and discussion, as well as site visits to Bay Area museums to meet with curators, conservators, and other museum professionals. Assignments will include presentations, short papers, reading summaries, and a final paper. [Auditors with faculty permission]

Bible, Art, Image, Dialogue (RABS-2100)

Credits:3

How can art, creativity, and imagination help us be better Bible readers, preachers, and teachers? This immersion course brings students into a dynamic conversation between biblical scholars and artists engaging the Word of God. We will engage what scholars are calling “visual exegesis” of the Bible, its relationship to other modes of biblical exegesis, and its potential for preaching and Bible study in local churches. The class will be structured around case studies of contemporary artists from different backgrounds (Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, and secular) as well as site visits to local depositories of sacred art. Topics include biblical characters and symbolism, social justice and the arts, interreligious dialogue, and the theologies and cultural contexts of different artists. Requirements: short visual-exegetical reflections shared in class (80%) and a practicum project on bringing this method into your own ministry and context (20%). Class meets weeknights June 18-29, 2018; 6:10pm to 9:40 pm.

Cross Cultural Experience: Rowanda Trip (RABS-2100)

Credits:3

"This course will incorporate travel to Rwanda July 8-20, 2018 as part of the learning experience. Readings for the course will include: Rwanda before the Genocide: Catholic politics and Ethnic Discourse in the Late Colonial Era and Inside Rwanda's Gacaca Courts. Themes for discussion and discovery will include: the impact of the church for good and for ill in societal conflicts; restorative justice; the strategies, successes, and failures of the Gacaca courts. Students will be required to meet June 17, 2017 from 1pm to 4pm for conversation around book #1 (listed above) as well as preparatory discussion for the trip. Students will be required to participate in all activities planned in Rwanda. A final paper will be required on a topic selected in consultation with the professor. Class meets 6/6/18 from 6:30pm-8:30pm at ABSW; and 7/8/18-7/20/18 in Rwanda."

MORAL FORMATION & FANTASY LIT (RAED-2500)

Credits:3

Moral formation for many begins in the pages of fables and fairy tales. As children empathize and relate to the characters in their fictional stories, they learn to form a moral script for their lives. This course will explore the historical timeline of children's fantasy literature, modern titles by J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, Madeleine L. Engle, Lois Lowry, and J.K. Rowling, as well as the religious education and moral formation that these texts provide to their readers. Alongside the literature, this course will also explore the illustrations and film adaptations of these famous texts. The course will require reading a book a week, critical engagements of texts through group discussions, and a final project that creatively explores ways that these texts could be used or incorporated in religious communities. Course taught by PhD student Michaela Eskew with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Kathryn Barush.

WRITING FOR RELIGIOUS LEADERS (RAFT-1200)

Credits:1.5

Whether working for justice, serving communities, or guiding organizations, religious leaders should be able to write well and often for a variety of audiences. Theological school is a perfect place for thinking about how we put our ideas and interpretations into words. Writing as religious leaders requires thoughtful articulation of our own ideas as well as the ability to clearly explain multiple perspectives on a variety of critical issues. This is an intensive course geared toward students who wish to improve their critical thinking skills and writing habits for graduate-level academic work and religious leadership. It is recommended for students early in their degree program, but open to all. Students will engage texts from a range of substantive topics and explore various writing assignments, which are common in their education at the GTU. Each day of the intensive week includes discussion of readings for comprehension and interpretation, dedicated writing time, peer-editing sessions, and skill-focused activities. Tuesday features a research skill-building seminar from a GTU research librarian. Meets 9:00am-12:30pm. Prior to the intensive, students will be asked to read and write a brief essay on an assigned topic, as well as familarize themselves with citation formats and several research and writing tools. Relates to Threshold 3. Course meets daily, 1/21/19-1/22/19, from 9am-2:pm at SKSM, and 1/23/19-1/25/19 from 9am-12:30pm at SKSM. [25 max enrollment]

CHURCH MUSIC & LTRGCL SINGING (RAFT-1710)

Credits:3

Introduction to music of the Anglican Liturgy, to prepare both lay and ordained to excersice musical leadership in the liturgy, and to develop guiding philosophies for the implementation of music in parish life. [Auditors excluded]

TRAUMA INFORMED RITUAL I (RAFT-2400)

Credits:1.5

Trauma Informed Ritual for Self and Community I is an intensive course that will introduce students to practical skills for identifying and leading compassionate, caring, and transformative rites for self, families and congregations/communities. Each day will include art-based creative practices in a studio setting. There will also be discussion/lectures and student presentations that explore concepts in trauma informed spiritual care. Special attention will be given to understanding the role of vigils, anniversary commemorations and the liturgical year as healing containers for community recovery. Daily reflection papers and an integrative final project will be required. Intended Audience: MDiv and MASC Required for Trauma Informed Ritual II offered in Spring 2019. Relates to SKSM thresholds #1: Life in Religious Community and Interfaith Engagement, #5: Spiritual Practice and Care of the Soul, #7: Educating for Wholeness and Liberation, #8: Embodied Wisdom and Beauty.   Relates to MFC competencies #1 Worship and Rites of Passage and #3: Spiritual Development for Self and Others. Course meets daily, 1/7/2019-1/11/2019, from 10am-2pm at SKSM. [15 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

Songs & Stories for All Ages (RAFT-2580)

Credits:3

TRAUMA INFORMED RITUAL II (RAFT-8400)

Credits:1.5

A follow-up integration experience for participants in Trauma Informed Ritual I offered in January 2019. Online Only. Half Semester. Students must contact the instructor via e-email prior to enrolling in order to receive permission to register. Registration is contingent upon faculty approval. Prerequisite: Trauma Informed Ritual I required. Relates to Thresholds: 1. 5. 7. 8. relates to MFC competencies: Worship and Rites of Passage, Spiritual Development for Self and Others Intended Audience: MDiv and MASC students who have completed the Trauma Informed Ritual I Format: Online Evaluation Method: group participation, reflection paper, interview with instructor [Faculty Consent Required; 15 max enrollment]

SAN FRANCISCO AND THE 1960'S (RAHR-5501)

Credits:3

This seminar surveys the religious and artistic counter-cultures that flourished in the Bay Area in the late 1950's and throughout the 1960's, attempting to bring together both the historiographies of new religious movements (Goddess-worship, neo paganism) and esotericism (Esalen) with an investigation into the field of cultural production. This entails (re)reading the Beats (Snyder, Kerouac, Ginsberg, Anne Waldman) as continuing an American project of religious and spiritual experimentalism, and diagramming the explicitly esoteric dimensions of avant-garde poetics (Jack Spicer's "radio" poems, Robert Duncan's HD book), painting (Jess Collins's use of alchemy and the occult), and music (Harry Smith). Site-visits will include a walk through locations in the North Beach neighborhood of San Francisco, and at least one session utilizing the GTU's special archive for the study of new religious movements. Course Audience: PhD / MA, Auditors with permission. Oral presentations; final research paper. [Auditors with faculty permission]

RELIGION, LIT, CLIMATE CHANGE (RAHR-5502)

Credits:3

This advanced seminar (PhD, MA) surveys recent contemporary literature and critical theory related to our environmental crisis: a crisis that is, if anything, the catastrophic failure to collectively imagine. If climate change fundamentally unsettles the ontological and epistemological premises of the humanities (as Dipesh Chakrabarty proposes), what, then, happens to the interdisciplinary field of religion and literature? What does "planetary literature" look like for an "aesthetic education" (Spivak) that models alternative pasts, presents, and futures for the human and the other-than-human? Readings will include Amitov Ghosh (Hungry Tide), Margaret Atwood (Year of Flood), David Mitchell (Bone Clocks), and various representatives from the ecopoetics movement; environmental and ecocritical theory will largely be drawn from the "new" materialisms that have fruitfully dialogued with process thought (and theology) following A.N. Whitehead. Final research paper, seminar presentation. Course Audience: PhD / MA, Auditors with permission. Oral presentations; final research paper.

POETRY FOR PREACHING (RAHS-0004)

Credits:0

Poetry for Preaching, Pastoral Care, and Life. “Poetry is distilled life” (Gwendolyn Brooks). This course is aimed at students who are interested in incorporating poetry into their future work, whatever shape that might take. It is designed to teach students how to use poetry everywhere from the pulpit to the hospital bed, from a wedding ceremony to an e-newsletter. Because poetry is the art of using language, familiarity with it will sharpen our gifts as preachers, care providers, and thinkers and writers of every kind. This course will be divided between lectures, seminar-style discussions, and workshops.

CHRISTIANITY IN 50 OBJECTS (RAHS-2061)

Credits:3

This survey course will examine the history of the Christian Church from the Apostolic Age to today through a close reading of 50 objects, inspired by the BBC and British Museum's recent collaboration, 'A History of the World in 100 Objects'. Prompted by the increasing scholarly interest in the art and material culture(s) of religion across a number of academic disciplines (including religious studies, history, literature, and anthropology) a select corpus of monuments, spaces, sculptures, pictures, liturgical art, and other objects will serve as a framework for discussion. Students will be evaluated through final research papers on an original topic of their choice (70% of final grade), class participation (10% of final grade), and an oral presentation (20% of final grade). Intended audience: any interested graduate student. This course is co-offered by GTU and JST.

POETRY FOR PREACHING (RAHS-2501)

Credits:3

Poetry for Preaching, Pastoral Care, and Life. “Poetry is distilled life” (Gwendolyn Brooks). This course is aimed at students who are interested in incorporating poetry into their future work, whatever shape that might take. It is designed to teach students how to use poetry everywhere from the pulpit to the hospital bed, from a wedding ceremony to an e-newsletter. Because poetry is the art of using language, familiarity with it will sharpen our gifts as preachers, care providers, and thinkers and writers of every kind. This course will be divided between lectures, seminar-style discussions, and workshops.

MARIAN ART (RAHS-4311)

Credits:3

QUEEN OF HEAVEN, MOTHER, ADVOCATE, OUR LADY OF VICTORY, STAR OF THE SEA From the early Christian centuries to today, representations of the Virgin Mary have evolved and changed, and are as diverse as her many titles. Using a cross-disciplinary approach, this course will closely examine the making, meaning, and reception of Marian images within the various social, religious, and cultural milieus from which they emerged. For example, we will consider Greek icons depicting Mary as Theotokos, or God-bearer, Italian Renaissance imagery of the Virgin and Child, nineteenth-century portrayals of Mary as the Immaculate Conception, the miraculous Madonnas at Guadalupe and Czestochowa, and vernacular Marian shrines. The course will include a pilgrimage to a local Marian site and museum/church visits. Students will be evaluated through final research papers on an original topic of their choice, class participation, and an oral presentation. Intended audience: any advanced graduate student interested in the art and material culture of religion.

JEWISH MUSIC MATTERS (RALS-0002)

Credits:0

Music offers a unique means of engaging individual emotion and spirituality, social solidarity and socio-cultural affirmation. It also demonstrates the mutual influences experienced by cultures living in proximity to one another over time. Jewish music, specifically, reflects the historical and contemporary, sacred and secular dimensions of the Jewish people. Spread throughout much of the world over a history of two millennia, this music has evolved into a rich variety of traditions as well as innovative composition. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach, we will explore highlights of this musical legacy touching on theories of culture to help us understand the power of music to create meaning. We will focus on the modern era, through lecture and discussion, multimedia, recorded and live music, as well as student presentations.

TRANSFORMATIVE RITUAL CRAFT (RALS-1150)

Credits:3

Ritual Craft as Transformative Practice is an exploration into the art and technology of ritual craft. This course supports students in developing a nuanced understanding of successful ritual structures and empowers students in cultivating skills to create and guide ritual. The course itself is a ritual immersion, with each class meeting structured as a ritual experience. Students are encouraged to deepen their own resonant ritual practices, to experience rituals in contexts new to them and to craft and guide ritual for the community. Students will identify their strengths and edges in ritual craft and leadership, and will receive structured support in enhancing their existing ritual strengths and in nurturing arenas in which they seek additional growth and experience. Intended Audience: MDiv and MASC students Relates to SKSM Thresholds 5 & 6 and MFC Comps 1 & 2 This course is High-Res only. [20 max enrollment]

PLTS CHOIR (RALS-1692)

Credits:1

Participants will attend rehearsals and sing in the choir at PLTS chapel on Wednesdays. A variety of musical styles will be represented in each semester's selections. Participants will be given the opportunity to select music appropriate to the day's worship, and to direct the choir on that day if they choose. This course emphasizes the importance of music and singing in Lutheran worship and offers opportunities to be a liaison to the PLTS worship preparation group. Credit/no credit only.

COMPOSING SACRED SPACES (RALS-2220)

Credits:3

^Art soothes pain! Art wakes up sleepers! Art fights against war & stupidity! ART SINGS HALLELUJA!^ - Peter Schumann, Glover, VT 1984 Art within the context of a Christian worship space has the potential to be transformative and healing, inspirational and meditative, educational and democratizing. It can be a powerful way to bring us closer to God. The goal of this part-workshop, part-art history course is to prepare and empower students to make aesthetic decisions for their churches and worship spaces by providing historical background and practical tools for locating and commissioning ecclesiastical artists. We will consider the iconographic content, use, and reception of chapel and shrine decorations, religious statues, icons, Stations of the Cross, textiles such as altar cloths and banners, and windows. Seminar format with in-class discussion and weekly reading assignments. Students will be evaluated through a project detailing their own ^mock-up^ design of a worship space (70% of final grade), class participation (10% of final grade), and an oral presentation on a historical issue relating to liturgical art and/or the spiritual role of matter (20% of final grade). Intended audience: MDiv, ThD, MTS, STD.

JEWISH MUSIC MATTERS (RALS-2360)

Credits:3

Music offers a unique means of engaging individual emotion and spirituality, social solidarity and socio-cultural affirmation. It also demonstrates the mutual influences experienced by cultures living in proximity to one another over time. Jewish music, specifically, reflects the historical and contemporary, sacred and secular dimensions of the Jewish people. Spread throughout much of the world over a history of two millennia, this music has evolved into a rich variety of traditions as well as innovative composition. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach, we will explore highlights of this musical legacy touching on theories of culture to help us understand the power of music to create meaning. We will focus on the modern era, through lecture and discussion, multimedia, recorded and live music, as well as student presentations.

Queering Christ in Text and Image & II (RARS-2002)

Credits:3

Who do you say that I am?” Matthew’s Jesus asked that question of his disciples (Mt 16:15). Many different answers and approaches to that question have appeared over the centuries since then. The question itself both expands and deepens when accompanied by visual engagements and responses. This course combines a variety of images and texts in an exploration of how “queer” Christ appears outside the “standard” or dominant representations of Jesus, and then further, how this queerness can inspire and inform movements of liberating social change. The co-teachers of this course will offer their expertise in Christology, queer theory, and the visual arts to invite an approach to social transformation rooted in historical traditions and contemporary insights. Beyond white, heterosexual maleness, who do you say Jesus is? MDIV Elective, CSR, MTS

RELIGION AND CINEMA (RAST-0003)

Credits:0

Introduction to a “canonical sample” of religious films from the silent era to the modern day. Building on previous film courses taught at GTU, the course will provide a broad spectrum of films from the United States and Europe representing different traditions of Christianity, including Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy, mainline and evangelical Protestantism, and expanding further into the Abrahamic religions of Judaism and Islam.

RELIGION AND THE CINEMA (RAST-2300)

Credits:3

Introduction to a “canonical sample” of religious films from the silent era to the modern day. Building on previous film courses taught at GTU, the course will provide a broad spectrum of films from the United States and Europe representing different traditions of Christianity, including Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy, mainline and evangelical Protestantism, and expanding further into the Abrahamic religions of Judaism and Islam.

CINEMA SEMINAR (RAST-4492)

Credits:3

This course involves advanced application of writing and analysis skills to films that are being shown in theaters during the busy spring awards season. The Bay Area is one of the best places remaining in the country to view new movies at public showings in theaters. There are three art house theaters within walking distance of the GTU campus, and numerous other independent theaters in the East Bay and in San Francisco. Everything of value to be seen in the art of cinema comes through the Bay Area.

SPECIAL TOPICS (RAST-9400)

Credits:1.5

FALL 2018: LANGS THEO ICONS MUSIC MOVIES Theology is a language about reality that involves the notion of the Divine involved in human life in its design, origins, and purpose. Theology can be expressed in a variety of "languages" and "grammars". In this class, we will expand the scope of theological language and imagination by experiencing, experimenting, analyzing, and employing the art of icons, music, and movies. The over-arching question is: How is God understood and experienced, and with that impact? [30 max enrollment]

RACE AS CONTEXT (RS-1394)

Credits:3

One of the foundational education commitments that undergirds this course is the assertion that all knowledge is contextual. In the various settings of ministry and social transformation, the context of race plays an important role in shaping our work, our approaches to that work, our understandings of our own role in that work, and the meaning we make of it. At its core, this course seeks to help us better understand who we are as raced beings, who God is, and who we are in relation to each other and the Holy. This course is designed as a path for exploring and understanding the ways that race in the United States operates as a social construct and lived experience in ourselves and in the communities we serve. Making use of historical, theoretical and theological lenses, we will engage in readings, dialogue, self reflection, and experiences with other artists and thinkers on race as we increase our capacity for leading and facilitating on this topic.

CONTEXTUAL THINKING (RS-1827)

Credits:3

One of the foundational education commitments that undergirds this course is the assertion that all knowledge is contextual. In the various settings of ministry and social transformation, context plays an important role in shaping our work, our approaches to that work, our understandings of our own role in that work, and the meaning we make of it. At its core, this course seeks to ground our theological explorations in a deeper understanding of our own social contexts, as we develop facility in translating from one context to another and engaging across difference. Focusing in particular on the case of race, this course is designed as a path for exploring and understanding the ways that race in all of its intersections operates as a social construct and lived experience in ourselves and in the communities we serve. Making use of historical, theoretical and theological lenses, we will engage in readings, dialogue, self reflection, and experiences with other artists and activists as we strengthen our commitment to addressing issues of prejudice, power, and privilege while cultivating cultural humility and cross- cultural competency.

AMERICAN CATHOLICISM TODAY (RS-2727)

Credits:3

Intended for future church leaders (both lay and ordained) as well as for students interested in religious trends and sociology of religion more generally, this course is designed to provide an sociological snapshot of the Catholic Church as it currently exists in the U.S. Among the topics to be addressed include: Catholic identity; institutional change; community and subcultures; religious leadership; and public Catholicism. Also serving as an introduction to sociological theory and method, this course also aims to equip students with the analytical tools to better understand and respond to various socio-cultural dynamics that will likely confront them throughout their academic and/or ministerial careers. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment]

ISLAM AND RELIGIOUS FREEDOM (RS-4001)

Credits:3

For SKSM students only, conducted in cooperation with the Religious Freedom Center of the Freedom Forum Institute (http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/programs/religious-civic-leaders/). In this blended-learning course, students will gain a common theoretical framework to examine issues at the intersection of Islam, Muslims, and religious freedom. The course will include a primer on international human rights law, Islamic law and theology, and religious freedom provisions that impact Muslims as minorities and non-Muslims in Muslim-majority states. Students must contact the instructor via e-email prior to enrolling in order to receive permission to register. Registration is contingent upon faculty approval and successful, separate application to the RFC by December 1. Online plus three day immersion at the RFC in Washington, DC. Travel expenses are the responsibility of the students. Instruction provided by RFC faculty, course administration by Christopher Schelin. Relates to SKSM Thresholds 1 and 2 and MFC Competencies 4, 5, and 7. [10 max enrollment; Auditors excluded] Class meets daily, 1/17/2019-1/19/2019.

RELIGION & SOCIAL TRANSFORM (RS-4077)

Credits:3

How does one go about changing the world? What difference do religious ideas and values make in a society that so often seems resistant to them? How does one move beyond an ideal (and/or idealistic) vision in order to bring about a new social reality that is more propitious of human flourishing? These are the sorts of questions that animate this class. In responding, we will investigate, among other critical topics, the efficacy of religious ideas and constituencies with respect to understanding and challenging institutional power, engendering civic discourse and engagement, and contributing to social movement activism. [20 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

RELIGION AND SOCIAL THEORY (RS-5515)

Credits:3

The purpose of this course is to introduce advanced students to important works in classical and contemporary social theory that enable scholars (and others) to better understand the complexities of contemporary religion. Secularization; social conflict and change; identity theory; globalization; rational choice theory – we will read the most crucial texts on such topics with an eye to how they shed light on how religion gets consolidated and enacted today. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment]

HUMAN RIGHT FREEDOM OF BELIEF (RS-8404)

Credits:3

For SKSM students only. The course introduces students to the human right of freedom of religion or belief, based on a review of the conceptual and operational tools, as well as illustrative empirical evidence, necessary for advanced study of the issue. The course is designed so that students of religious studies and/or theology, as well as religious leaders, can develop an understanding of how this right has come to be defined, protected, interrogated, and addressed, in a global order that remains organized according to the (evolving and problematic) political entity known as the state. Students must contact the instructor via e-email prior to enrolling in order to receive permission to register. Registration is contingent upon faculty approval. Relates to SKSM Threshold 1 and 2 and MFC Comp 4, 5, and 7. Conducted in cooperation with the Religious Freedom Center of the Newseum, http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/admissions/areas-of-study/religious-civic-leaders/. Online during the Fall 2018 Semester (September-December) plus three day immersion at the RFC in Washington, DC. Travel expenses are the responsibility of the students. Separate application must be made to the Religious Freedom Center. Designed and administered by Dr. Elizabeth H. Prodromou of the RFC, supervised by Christopher Schelin (http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/contact/directory/?entry=25). [Faculty Consent required; 10 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

Justice in New Orleans (RSCE-2165)

Credits:3

"This course will incorporate travel to New Orleans July 29-August 4, 2018 (tentative dates) as part of the learning experience. Students will study the history of New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. We will participate in rebuilding efforts, meet residents involved in community development, and discuss the intersections of injustice faced by the residents of the Lower 9th Ward. Students will be required to meet July 7, from 1pm to 4pm for conversation around pre-trip readings and discussion of the trip. Students will be required to participate in all activities planned in New Orleans. A final paper will be required on a topic selected in consultation with the professor. Class meets 7/7/18 from 1:00pm-4:00pm at ABSW, and 7/29/18-8/4/19 in New Orleans."

SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION (RSCE-2701)

Credits:3

Religion is an enormously important and, despite all the talk about us living in a ^secular^ society, persistent component of human experience. This course will introduce students to the sociological study of religion and provide them with the requisite theoretical tools for assessing the ongoing (and ever changing) salience and functions of religion in the modern world. Among the topics to be addressed are: the ways in which religion shapes individual meaning systems; processes of religious conversion and commitment; types and dynamics of religious collectivities (e.g., denominations, cults, sects, etc.); secularization theory; the impact of religion on social cohesion, conflict and change; and the connection between religion and popular culture. Format: Lecture and discussion sections. Requirements: Classroom participation, short papers and a written final exam. [20 max enrollment]

PEACE, RECONCILIATION, & CONFLICT RESOLUTION (RSCE-2705)

Credits:2

This course is co-taught by Simon Kim and Elise Rutagambwa. Peace, Reconciliation, and Conflict Resolution is a multidisciplinary course that exposes students to a unique area of studies that brings together the humanities and social sciences so as to provide a deeper understanding of conflicts, reconciliation, and peace. These three elements are interrelated and fundamentally affect the human person as a whole in his/her relation to a three-dimensional world (human-natural-spiritual). By focusing on the African context, students will better understand how the local context affects this multidisciplinary approach for other parts of the world. This course is part of joint virtual classroom with Hekima College in Nairobi, Kenya. Learn with students from across the globe and from world-class theologians such as Laurenti Magesa and A. E. Orobator, SJ. (February 5, 12, 19, 26 / March 5,12, 19 / April 2 /Tuesdays, 8:00am-11:00am)

CHRISTIAN SOCIAL ETHICS (RSCE-3230)

Credits:3

This course will consider the tradition of Roman Catholic Social Teaching and modern social ethics. Issues to be treated will include Christian interpretations of violence and non-violence, war and peace, global and domestic justice, human rights, bioethics, and ecological ethics. In assessing these issues, we will consider the interpretative perspectives of a liberation theology and Christian feminism. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment]

FAITH AND POLITICS (RSCE-4159)

Credits:3

This course is designed to help students think more deeply about the relationship between faith and politics. Topics include: How ought the religious convictions of citizens shape their political views and activity in a pluralistic society? What does religious freedom entail? Does religious language belong in public? What is relationship between morality and law? Why are people of faith so divided on political issues? Is there any hope for common ground? Our focus will be on Christianity in in the U.S., with some attention to the broader global, interreligious context of contemporary political theology. Format: reading/discussion and lecture. Student evaluation will be based on weekly one-page reading reflection papers, participation, and a final paper.

WESTERN SOCIAL THOUGHT II (RSCE-5003)

Credits:3

This class is part two of the doctoral level seminar focused on Western ethics and social thought. The course prepares students to contextualize the major figures from the 1800's to 21st century in the development of the disciplines of ethics and social theory, and to interrelate these disciplines with other areas if their study. We read together significant texts from what is currently considered the canon for these academic disciplines, and work on relating the significance of each text to its time, to other texts, and to contemporary reading of them. An Introduction to Christian Ethics or Moral Theology is prerequisite for this course. Evaluation will be based on class presentations, weekly essays and one research paper. The course is intended for PhD students but MA/MTS students can take the course after they complete an interview with instructor. [Faculty Consent required; 10 max enrollment; Interview required]

SEXUALTY, ETHICS, CULTURE, FAITH (RSCE-8248)

Credits:3

Co-taught by Justin Sabia-Tanis and Latishia James. This course will offer students a comprehensive look at human sexuality from a variety of disciplines, including theology, ethics, education, pastoral ministry, economics, and LGBTQ studies. The course will be grounded in knowledge about the human body and the ways in which sexuality and intimacy play an important role in human development and well-being. Students will have the opportunity to learn about sex education practices, including curricula, in use in progressive communities of faith, as well as engage with current social justice issues relating to sexuality, such as reproductive health care, LGBTQ rights and more. The course will also include panels and field trips, giving students an opportunity to engage directly with the sexual communities and service providers.

INTRO WOMANIST THEOETHICS (RSCE-8401)

Credits:3

Introduction to Womanist Theoethics: Intersectional Analysis of Oppression - This Course introduces students to the Womanist liberative lens, particularly the theoethical methods used to analyze oppressive ecclesial and societal systems. As learning outcomes, students will learn from engaging readings and discourse to comparatively identify methods and tools adaptable for their contextual ministry praxis. Students will gain insights from womanist scholar-practitioners across multiple theological traditions. Online discussion groups and reflection papers are required.

Leadership Along the Way (RSED-2200)

Credits:3

The rationale for this course is to develop one’s own life-cultivating (i.e. sustainable) leadership in relationship to the long arc of social change and transformation that existed before our time and will continue after us. We will explore ways of managing time and energy, rediscovering our agency amidst unpredictable and chaotic moments, and leading in a way that honors the leadership present in any given moment, as well as the leadership that preceded and will follow such moments. This course is in-person, interactive, and rooted in Taoist and Zen praxis. Students will be expected to complete readings, reflections, and activities that will deepen their leadership practice. Relates to SKSM Threshold 1 and MFC Comps 5 & 7.

THEATRE OF THE OPPRESSED (RSED-4036)

Credits:3

Theater of the Oppressed is a collection of games, techniques, exercises for using theater as a vehicle for personal and social change. It is a method of using the dynamized human body and the charged theatrical space as a laboratory for exploring power, transforming oppression, and finding community-building solutions to the problems of inequality, conflict, injustice and suffering. Based on the radical pedagogy of Paolo Freire and Augusto Boal, it is a collective artistic exploration in to the fullest expression of our human dignity, potential and creativity. This is an introductory workshop covering the theory, application and facilitation of TO, including: Demechanization, Dynamization, Image Theater, Forum Theater, Rainbow of Desire, Cop-in-the-Head, Theory & Pedagogy This workshop will be 80% experiential and 20% reflective/didactic. No prior theater experience is required. Relates to SKSM thresholds 2, 4, 8 and MFC Comps 4 & 6. [25 max enrollment]

POWER AND MOVEMENTS (RSED-4907)

Credits:3

The rationale of this course is to engage the interdependence of individual and collective power in contributing to social change movements, sustainability, and liberation. The course will explore specific approaches to change through various perspectives of power, organization, and movement. This includes the artificial and natural phenomena that contribute to and are perpetuated by interlocking systems of domination. Participants will have the opportunity to develop their relationship with collective liberation by: studying the qualities, forms, and functions of power and movements; working with concrete tools that deepen individual, interpersonal, and institutional relationships with power and movements; reflecting upon the wisdom of spiritual and secular sources; and collaborating in the equitable cultivation of community. Students will be expected to complete readings, case-studies, reflections, and a final project that contributes to the collective wisdom of the class. Meets SKSM Threshold #4: History of Dissenting Tradition and Thea/ological Quest. Meets MFC Comp. #6: Serves the Larger UU Faith Intended Audience: MDiv, MASC, MA [Faculty Consent required; 16 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

ECO-Intensive (RSFT-1017)

Credits:3

Educating to “Create Just and Sustainable Communities that Counter Oppressions” (“ECO”) is a core goal of Starr King’s M.Div. and M.A.S.C. degree programs. In this required core intensive, M.Div. and M.A.S.C. students work together to form a framework for counter-oppressive spiritual leadership. We will ask: how can spirituality, ministry, and religious activism respond to the multiple and intersecting realities of injustice, suffering, and oppression in our lives and our world? What models of justice and sustainable community invite our commitment? Drawing on Unitarian Universalist and multi-religious sources, we will explore how in the midst of a world marked by tragedy, sorrow and injustice there remain abiding resources of beauty and grace that nourish resistance, offer healing and call us to accountability and community building. Reading and writing assignments to be completed before the course. Final paper. This course has a special focus on economic and racial justice addressed intersectionally. Relates to Thresholds #2,5,7 and 8 and MFC Competency #4. Summer section meets daily, 8/20/18-8/24/18, from 9am-5pm at SKSM. Intersession section meets daily, 1/14/19-1/19-19, from 9am-5pm at SKSM [22 max enrollment; Auditors excluded from Summer 2018 section]

METHODS & HERMENEUTICS I (RSFT-1120)

Credits:1.5

This course is a general introduction to Hermeneutics and Methods. Its main goal is to explore different approaches, methodologies, and optics to interpreting religious, theological, and biblical texts. The course is designed to serve as an introduction to theological methods (Methods and Hermeneutics II), providing the necessary background to understand the developments of theological reflections as they have manifested in the XX and XXI centuries. As such, the course focuses on theory and critical theory with a focus on linking such developments to the study of the Sacred Texts in the Christian tradition. This course is offered as a seven-week intensive starting the week of September 3, 2018 and ending the week of October 15, 2018. [20 max enrollment]

METHODS & HERMENEUTICS II (RSFT-1121)

Credits:1.5

This course is an introduction to Theological Hermeneutics and Methods. Its main goal is to explore different approaches, methodologies, and optics to interpreting theological, and biblical texts. The course is designed to serve as an continuation to the introduction to Hermeneutics (Methods and Hermeneutics I), mapping the developments of theological reflection in the XX and XXI centuries. Prerequisite: RSFT-1120 Methods & Hermeneutics I. This course is offered as a seven-week intensive starting the week of February 4, 2019 and ending the week of March 18, 2019. Meets Thursdays 9:40am-12:55pm.

INTO FTH-ROOTED SOC TRANSFORM (RSFT-1300)

Credits:3

This course will introduce the arts and theology of social transformation where it is rooted in and guided by practices and beliefs of Christian faith traditions, critically and constructively engaged. Students will explore and develop beginning competencies (spiritual, theological, social theoretical, and strategic) for social transformation ministry as it involves faith communities “gathered” for worship and “sent” into the world. Emphasis will be on theologies, analysis, and action at the race-class-gender-earth nexus. For PLTS students, an emphasis will be on resources of Lutheranisms, including the ELCA and the global Lutheran communion. [30 max enrollment]

FOUNDATIONS FOR MINISTRY (RSFT-1615)

Credits:3

SUMMER 2018 This course will provide the basic skills and subject familiarity for engagement with graduate-level scholarly practice and is designed to critically reflect upon the nature and content of Anglican spiritual identity, including an introduction to history and global Anglicanism, liturgy and music, congregational dynamics, and developing skills of close and active reading. Evaluation will be via short papers, presentations, and a final research paper. The course is intended for MDiv, CAS, and MTS students. Course meets weekdays, 6/11/18-6/22/18, from 2pm-5:45pm at CDSP. FALL 2018 This course will provide the basic skills and subject familiarity for engagement with graduate-level scholarly practice and is designed to critically reflect upon the nature and content of Anglican spiritual identity, including an introduction to history and global Anglicanism, liturgy and music, congregational dynamics, and developing skills of close and active reading. Evaluation will be via short papers, presentations, and a final research paper. The course is intended for MDiv, CAS, and MTS students.

Faith-Based Community Organization (RSFT-2300)

Credits:1.5

In this course participants will explore the basic arts and tools of faith-based community organizing from a biblical and faith-tradition perspective, through a racial equity lens. The course will deal with attitudes and behaviors around building and exercising public power, cultivating justice-centered relationships, developing leaders, working with interfaith and non-faith-based partners, taking public action, and changing public policy and institutional and corporate practices to reflect the just and beloved community God intends. The course will draw upon and integrate students’ knowledge gained in previous courses in theology, ethics, Bible, and practical theological disciplines. This course prepares participants to lead ministries that work for justice using the disciplines of community organizing. [Scheduling Note: Intensive taught May 21-25 9:00am-1:30pm with afternoon and evening group homework: MW 1:30-5:00pm, TTH 1:30-3:00pm, 6:00-8:00pm, F 1:30-3:00pm]

MINISTRY ACROSS CULTURES (RSFT-2550)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to Multicultural Studies in the context of Theological Education. As such we will explore the “problem” of multicultural USA from a three-fold perspective: historical, philosophical, and theological. First, the historical focus provides a chronological account of the current state of affairs, a diachronic understanding of race relationships in the USA. Second, the philosophical emphasis reflects critically on the ways in which we “construct” such national histories/stories and how Liberalism fails to provide a convincing solution. Third, a theological approach reflects on the intersection of Christianity and Racism offering a diagnosis of the imbrications of theological and ethnic discourses and tentative solutions to the legacy of racism within different theologies. [FE-1200 Anti-Racism Training; 30 max enrollment]

READINGS CONGS IN CONTEXT (RSFT-8120)

Credits:1.5

This fully online, asynchronous course assists you in establishing and integrating observational skills and tools of critical theological reflection for the purpose of discerning the socio/political, historical, liturgical, and "theological" cultures of selected congregations. You will observe and analyze a selected congregation at its worship in order to identify the particular cultural and contextual dynamics operative within the congregations. You will also engage in ethnographic fieldwork in order to reflect on the congregation's "cultures" and "ecologies", as defined in assigned texts. Guiding your observations and theological reflections are questions like: *how worship space is organized and utilized; *how the worshiping community integrates itself into the contexts in which it is located; *what worship means to both clergy and lay members in these communities; and *how worship embodies and expresses a particular community's understanding of who God is and how God works in the world. Central to the course is conducting fieldwork and your preparation of an in-depth congregational study of your selected congregation, using either PowerPoint or Prezi. [20 max enrollment]

FAITH-ROOTED ORGANIZING (RSFT-8405)

Credits:3

This foundational course – applicable to all vocational paths, from community organizing to parish ministry to non-profit leadership to theological scholarship – explores tools, best practices, and multi-religious theologies for faith-rooted organizing for change. Paying close attention to the intersections of social issues, identities, and religious traditions, participants will draw lessons from a diversity of historical and contemporary movements, ranging from Black Lives Matter to climate justice. Merging the pastoral with the practical, students will learn to articulate their unique faith-rooted organizing style and strategize on how to take concrete, spiritually grounded action in their own congregations and communities. Relates to SKSM Threshold #1: Life in Religious Community and Interfaith Engagement and #2: Prophetic Witness and Work Relates to MFC Competency #4: Social Justice in the Public Square This course meets online and is asynchronous on Zoom. [15 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT (RSFT-8411)

Credits:3

Merging the practical and pastoral, this foundational, introductory course helps equip students for effective organizational management and leadership – whether serving congregations, leading other religious institutions, or bringing spiritual leadership to secular settings. Topics include non-profit administration, governance, finance, strategic planning, human resources, change management, and organizational culture – and how these relate to ministry. This interactive, multi-faceted course blends readings and written assignments with group discussion, coaching, independent research, and a praxis (action/reflection) component. With the support of the instructor, students will customize their course experience to build on their unique learning goals, aptitudes, and areas for improvement as organizational leaders. Relates to SKSM Threshold #2: Life in Religious Community and Interfaith Engagement threshold Relates to MFC competency for Administration. Note: This course fulfills the leadership intensive requirement for SKSM students pursuing vocational paths other than Unitarian Universalist ministry. [15 max enrollment]

FORCED MIGRAT. & SOCIAL JUST. (RSHR-8412)

Credits:3

This course encompasses the study of racial/ethnic, gender and religious identity negotiations of Latina/o migrants both from theoretical literature as well as case studies. The many issues entailed to migratory patterns such as those of Latina/o migrants are examined through an interdisciplinary approach. The literature from the many disciplines involved in the study on these topics is vast, hence you are expected to be familiar with the main themes as viewed in class. The first section of the course will focus on general theoretical themes that cut across the course's cases. It will provide you with tools to analyze the experiences of Latina/o migrants in general. The second section will focus first on the case of the United States and then on the case of Japan. Relates to SKSM Thresholds 1, 2, 5, 6, 7 & 8. and MFC Comps 2, 3, 4 & 7. Intended Audience: MA, Mdiv, MASC, PhD with additional coursework [20 max enrollment]

PROMISED LAND AND IMMIGRANTS (RSHR-8427)

Credits:3

This course encompasses the study of racial/ethnic, gender and religious identity negotiations of Latina/o migrants both from theoretical literature as well as case studies. The many issues entailed to migratory patterns such as those of Latina/o migrants are examined through an interdisciplinary approach. The literature from the many disciplines involved in the study on these topics is vast, hence you are expected to be familiar with the main themes as viewed in class. The first section of the course will focus on general theoretical themes that cut across the course's cases. It will provide you with tools to analyze the experiences of Latina/o migrants in general. The second section will focus first on the case of the United States and then on the case of Japan. Relates to SKSM Thresholds 1, 2, 5, 6, 7 and MFC Comps 2, 3, 4, 7. Intended Audience: MDiv, MA, and MASC; PHD With extra coursework Evaluation Method: 2 reflection papers, weekly class participation, final project. [20 max enrollment]

QUEERING ECCLESIOLOGY & RITE (RSHR-8450)

Credits:3

Across Asia and Latin America we are witnessing the emergence of queer faith-based communities in very different contexts and histories. Exploring the way that these communities address issues of ecclesiology and rites would benefit students to explore the ways that our global village is moving in terms of the intersections among religion, gender, and sexuality. The course investigates what are the struggles and mechanisms that these communities have to cope in their context with ingrained homophobia. At the same time, it will examine how those communities enact interreligious and multireligious dialogue and rituals and how faith and activism are coupled to counter oppressive discourses and colonial performativities in their own situations. The course also features guest ministers and activists from different context to whom we can turn to learn from their experiences and who will be “present” every class through recorded videos. Relates to SKSM Thresholds 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and MFC Comps 1, 2, 3, 6, 7. Intended Audience: MDiv, MA, and MASC; PHD With extra coursework Evaluation Method: 2 reflection papers, weekly class participation, final project. [20 max enrollment]

GANDHI, NONVIOLENCE, JAINISM (RSHS-4155)

Credits:3

The course explores an interactive exploration of the work of Mahatma Gandhi in relation to the foundational Indic philosophical principles of nonviolence and truth, and Jainism's unique practice of non-harming. Jainism, along with Hinduism and Buddhism, is one the three great religions that emerged in ancient India. Gandhi is known as the leader of India's freedom struggle against British colonial rule and oppression; the movement he instigated led successfully to India's sovereign independence. Gandhi was also a major influence on global leaders, particularly Martin Luther King Jr. and Nelson Mandela. The course will begin with a detailed inquiry into the foundations of nonviolence in the Indic context, then focus on its profound interpretation in Jain philosophy, treating of its complex cosmology, non-theistic theology, self psychology, morality, ascetic and lay principles of living, as well as the life-goals, culminating in the liberation of the soul from worldly entrapments. Gandhi was able to evolve the powerful principles of truth, nonviolent resistance, positive action, satyagraha, (truth-force), reinforced by personal disciplines of renunciation-a fundamental component of Indic spirituality-including practices such as chastity, fasting, charity, prayer, and empathic love towards the other, as well as empowering the disadvantaged (e.g., women, and under-caste groups). We conclude with the application and relevance of Indic conception of non-violence and pluralism for engaged struggles toward human rights; tolerance; social justice; economic equitability; environmental restoration; and other egalitarian actions in a post-secular world.

PSYCHOLOGY AND SPIRITUALITY (RSSP-2000)

Credits:3

The spiritual quest is fundamental to human growth and experience and includes both spiritual and psychological aspects. In this course we will consider what a constructive engagement of spirituality and psychodynamic psychology might look like – for example, what does the developmental process of religious belief look like, what is its function in the person and in the person’s relational worlds, how to differentiate maladaptive from authentic spirituality. In addition, we will delve into the role of early psychological development on later spiritual growth, the development of the “God Image” and its role in human development, as well as some of the more current work in intentionally bridging spirituality and psychology. This course will utilize a primarily psychoanalytic relational approach, using the writings of psychoanalysts DW Winnicott, William Meissner, SJ, Anna-Maria Rizzuto, and Michael Eigen, and others, as the lens through which we will encounter the broad areas of spirituality and religion. We will explore theory as well as practice, including opportunities to reflect on and discuss personal applications of these ideas. This course is primarily intended for MDiv, MA, and MTS, but can be upgraded.

MYSTICISM & SOCIAL CHANGE (RSSP-5000)

Credits:3

This course will explore the powerful synergy between mystic spirituality and social activism. Martin Luther King Jr. wrote, “Only through an inner spiritual transformation do we gain the strength to fight vigorously the evils of the world in a humble and loving spirit.” In the urgent and troubling context of current world events, we will look to the example of “mystic-activists” from diverse cultures and faith traditions for insight and inspiration. Readings and class explorations include Buddhist, Christian, Hindu, Jewish, Muslim, and Indigenous sources. The ethical implications of the mystic worldview will be a focus throughout. Through a wholistic approach of both heart and head, we will consider specific practices to nourish and sustain an ongoing commitment to justice work and ministerial service. Expect a highly interactive lecture-discussion format enriched by audio and video materials and student praxis projects. Evaluation will be based on the student's quality of engagement (preparation & participation), short papers, and praxis project presentation. Intended Audience: Advanced masters level and also suitable for PhD / DMin students. Threshold Areas 2 &5 and MFC Comp 4. This course is high residency only. Students must contact the instructor via e-email prior to enrolling in order to receive permission to register. Registration is contingent upon faculty approval. [18 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

New Voices in Anglicanism (RSST-2220)

Credits:3

This course is designed to read and reflect upon a number of new voices from around the Anglican Communion in order to broaden our understanding of the Anglican tradition, Readings will represent clerical and lay voices of the last thirty years in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the South Pacific. [Letter grade only.]

RELIGION AND DEMOCRACY (RSST-3500)

Credits:3

Anxious about the midterm elections? Passionate about our democracy and want to improve it? In this seminar, we will not only vent frustrations but value democratic dialogue while engaging even the most divisive issues. We will learn how bringing our convictions to the public square, whether liberal or conservative, religious or irreligious, can strengthen the social fabric and promote the common good. Through lively discussion, news stories, lectures, and multimedia, this course will trace the theological sources of, and resources for healing, our partisan politics today. Religion is a powerful feature of American civil society, so this will be an excellent complement for students interested in public policy, law, public administration, and ministry. Open to all MDiv/MA/MTS students. Auditors welcome. This course is taught by PhD student Leonard McMahon with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Jay Johnson.

FNDTNS CHRISTIAN SPIRITUALITY (SP-1125)

Credits:1.5

This course is designed to provide a general survey of the general theological basis for and characteristics of spirituality as practiced in Christian traditions. Students will delve into the theological underpinnings of Christian spirituality, interact with writings on Christian spirituality from historical as well as contemporary authors, explore various forms of Christian spirituality, and engage various practices of Christian spirituality in order to construct their own conceptual framework of Christian spirituality that will enable them to evaluate the effectiveness of various practices and to engage in them in ways that will deepen their own faith. Students will participate in this work through: course readings; writing assignments; in-class lectures, discussions, and activities; and, a final culminating project. This course is offered as a two-week intensive starting the week of September 3, 2018 and ending the week of September 10, 2018.Meets Fridays 9:40am-2pm and Saturdays 8:30am-3pm. [30 max enrollment]

ORIENTATION TO THEO EDUCATION (SP-1500)

Credits:1.5

This course is required of entering M.Div students. It will be conducted in seminar style, encouraging active discussion. We will explore disciplines of theological education as well as spiritual practices students might encounter. Emphasis is placed on the practice of academic writing. The class will work on one short term paper which will go through several drafts.

CONTEMPLATIVE SPIRITUALITY AND PRACTICE (SP-2003)

Credits:1

The common quest among Christians to find spiritual support in Eastern traditions challenges us to consider what may be missing in contemporary Christian spiritual practices. This one credit course allows students to explore contemplative spirituality and practice, including lectio divina and silent meditation. After an introductory meeting in Berkeley, students will spend four nights at the New Camaldoli Hermitage in Big Sur. Students will share in the liturgical prayers of the hermitage and learn about the contemplative life while reflecting on their own spiritual journey. These practices readily complement lay life or approaches to the Divine from other religious communities and traditions. In addition to tuition, students will be charged a fee of $250, which includes room and board. Limit 8 students; priority given to JST degree students; Renewal participants if space is available. Camaldolese monks from Incarnation Monastery and New Camaldoli Hermitage Wednesday, 1/16/19 to Sunday, 1/20/19 at Big Sur Monastery. One prior meeting TBD.

LEADING WITH COURAGE & EQUITY (SP-2043)

Credits:1.5

This course is co-taught by Dr. Daeseop Yi & Dr. Gloria Burgess. Without being aware of who we are and why we are here, we can't become who we are meant to be or use all of our God-given gifts. This course will explore enablers, obstacles, and resources to lead and serve with courage and equity in a diverse world. We will draw on diverse contemplative practices to become more aware of who we are, why we are here, and the importance of learning in an intentional community. This process of becoming ourselves will help spiritual directors, formation facilitators, and pastors be more present to others and create a space in which the Holy Spirit can transform us. This session is also open to the wider community as a Spiritual Retreat. Course may be taken for variable units. Course meets daily, 1/7/19-1/11/19, from 9am-5pm at SFTS.

CTSC DYNAMICS OF TRAUMA (SP-2055)

Credits:3

In this first course in the Certificate in Trauma and Spiritual Care, students will explore the basic dynamics of trauma from a variety of perspectives: sociological, psychological, psychiatric, neuroscience, relational, theological and spiritual. We will begin by exploring the great variety of trauma events, the demographics of trauma, related studies from the emerging field of traumatology. From the psychological and psychiatric fields we will identify trauma symptoms, and the concept of PTSD and Traumatic Loss. We will learn how to recognize the presence of trauma. Finally, we will explore the theological, spiritual and moral dimensions to trauma and the traumatized person, including the concept of “moral injury.” Along the way, we will touch on implications for the treatment and healing of traumatized persons, but a subsequent course in the certificate program will deal more directly with the dynamics of healing, recovery and treatment. We welcome to this class all who minister to and with traumatized persons. This course is offered on 4 weekends in the fall semester. Classes will be held during 4 weekends: 9/7-8, 10/5-6, 11/2-3, 11/30-12/1. Fridays: 6-9pm, Saturdays: 9am-4pm.

CAMINO IGNACIANO (SP-2074)

Credits:3

This course will offer an concrete mean to deepen one’s spiritual life in the Ignatian tradition and identity through re-reading Ignatius’ Autobiography, exploring the meaning of the road, camino, in Jesuit theology of mission, experiencing a simple life in an intentional faith community on the road. The course will be divided into two parts. The first part consists of readings and discussion over Ignatius’ Autobiography and some of the most recent research on this work. Classes, which will take place on campus of JST during the Spring semester of 2019, will meet 8 times (once every two weeks, 3 hours each) over the semester. Participants will meet in 8 sessions (3 hours each) throughout the semester for this purpose. The second part includes the Pilgrimage itself in Spain and end in Rome, all will take place in Europe for 2 weeks. Course work includes lectures, discussion, and composing and presenting in group one’s own extensive spiritual biography. Pilgrimage consists of walking, sharing faith and the Eucharist, and at time preparing meals together. Evaluative components of the course include, in addition to students’ active participation in discussion, a personal autobiography project from each student for presentation in class, three short reflection papers (2 – 3 pages), and a final project presented at the end of the course (equivalent of 15 written page paper). Participation in the pilgrimage pending on how one participates in the course work. Application/interview required. (Requirement: personal knowledge or working experience in Ignatian Spirituality, good physical health to be able to walk in mountainous regions, respect and sensitive to cultures different to one’s own, open to share and able to live simply.) [Faculty Consent required; 10 max enrollment]

DYNAMICS IN THE SPIR. EXER. (SP-2077)

Credits:3

This course will offer an introductory studies in Ignatian spirituality as developed by Ignatius of Loyola (1491 - 1556) by his early companions, demonstrated particularly through the various spiritual dynamics in the Spiritual Exercises. Reading materials include Ignatius' own writings and those of his contemporaries as well as contributions by modern authors and interpreters. Themes will include Ignatian worldview, Ignatian discernment, Ignatian conversion, contemplative in action, the practice of examen, and finding God in all things. Class format includes both lectures and discussion. Evaluative component of the course consist of, in addition to students' active participation in discussion, a personal autobiography project from each student for presentation in class, three short reflection papers (1 - 2 pages) and a final term paper (15 pages). [15 max enrollment]

INCARNATIONAL SPIRITUALITY (SP-2120)

Credits:1

This workshop is an invitation to explore and experience how the body is an active participant in our spiritual journey, the Word becoming flesh as an invaluable source of enlightenment. Liberating the mind from dualism and elevating our consciousness to greater states of expansive awareness create alchemy of body, mind and spirit. The life conditions of ancient Israel and the times of Jesus in the Gospels are obviously different from ours, but the deep and lifelong need for embodiment is core to prayer and living life to the full. [15 max enrollment] Course meets on two Saturdays, 4/6/19 & 4/13/19, from 8:30am-5pm.

SALESIAN IDENTITY AND CHARISM (SP-2130)

Credits:3

As a platform for understanding the specific charism of St John Bosco, youth apostle and founder of the Salesian Family, students unpack the Christian concept of charism particularly with reference to vocation and mission. The course begins with a survey of the first biblical references to "charisma/charismata", and students follow theological developments of the term. Emphasis shifts then to Consecrated Life. In response to the invitation of Vatican II, methods for identifying the charism of the founder will be explored along with the question of expressing the spirit of the founder in changing cultural realities. In the final portion of the course, attention will be given to how the theology of charism and consecration relates specifically to the Salesian Family. Format: Lecture/discussion. Evaluation: group work, class presentation and research paper.

SPIRITUAL ACCOMPANIMENT (SP-2131)

Credits:3

The course offers insights on the traits of spiritual accompaniment that emerge from St. John Bosco's writings and life experience. It also offers an outlook on those theological themes presented by Don Bosco to his young readers in his endeavor to accompany them on the path of salvation. Themes such as salvation, eschatology, ecclesiology, the sacraments, and the virtues, feature constantly in Don Bosco's writings. The course will also give an overview of the Saint's life experience, especially his spiritual experiences, his experience of God and of spiritual friendships. The course is divided in three parts. The first part will take a brief overview of the historical context of the 19th century - the century in which Don Bosco lived and worked. Don Bosco was a son of his century and therefore the language, the approach, the theology and especially the Church of this century, together with the historical events that were emerging in Europe and especially in Italy, influenced his thought and his modus operandi. The second part will offer an overview of the dynamics of spiritual direction and spiritual accompaniment. Besides discussing some authors, this part will also highlight Don Bosco's own experience in both spiritual direction and accompaniment. This is done so that everything will be put into context, especially that which concerns the person of St. John Bosco. The third and final part will give insights on Don Bosco's writings and present him as an emerging spiritual accompanier of the young. This part will take a look at some of his selected writings, particularly those addressed to the young and the emerging characteristics of spiritual accompaniment from these same writings. The course will be delivered through lectures. However, dialogue and interaction are highly encouraged. The final evaluation will be in the form of an oral/discussion/exam. This final evaluation will be divided in three parts: a presentation of a book on spiritual direction or accompaniment, chosen by the student. In the second part the student is presented with a "case" and he or she must take the role of spiritual director/directress or accompanier. He or she must show that the "case" is well understand and must offer insights to the directee or the accompanied (the examiner, in this case) that can help him or her to grow spiritually and to enhance his or her relationship with God. The third part of the exam will be a question posed by the examiner and it will be mainly about the core part of the course, that is, about spiritual accompaniment as envisioned by Don Bosco. Although the course has a Salesian theme, it is opened to all, especially to those students who would like to enhance their knowledge on spiritual direction and accompaniment. The course also offers practical ways and approaches how to direct or accompany the young. The course is opened to those students who are reading a MDiv, and MA/MTS or a DMin and to all those interested.

MINISTERIAL DISCERNMENT (SP-2467)

Credits:1

MINISTERIAL DISCERNMENT: WHAT’S NEXT IN MY LIFE, MINISTRY, OR CAREER? Using the Ignatian model of discernment, this course will help Masters students, sabbaticants, and local people in ministry to discern their future directions. It includes: identifying individual gifts, talents, and charisms; clarifying the purpose to which one feels called to put their giftedness and the work setting where one can be happiest and most productive; and learning the most effective ways of communicating one’s goals to those with responsibility for hiring or assignment decisions. Class meets Saturdays, 3/2 and 3/16/2019, from 8:30am to 5:00 pm.

IGNATIAN DISCERNMENT (SP-2468)

Credits:3

This course offers in-depth studies of Ignatian discernment, how it is found in the foundational documents of the Society of Jesus, namely, the Spiritual Exercises, the Spiritual Diary, the Constitutions of the Society of Jesus, and some of Ignatius' letters; how it is interpreted and understood both by Ignatius' contemporaries and scholars of contemporary time. Particularly, the course will explore in depth the Rules of Discernment of the First and Second Week found in the Spiritual Exercises [Ej 313 - 336]. Students investigate the personal and ministerial applications of Ignatian discernment through case studies, classroom discussions, 3 short reflection papers (2 - 3 pages), and a final research project (15 - 20 pages). Format is seminar and lecture. [Experience with the Spiritual Exercises; Faculty Consent required; 15 max enrollment; Auditors with Faculty permission].

EXPERIMENTS PRAYER & MEDITATN (SP-2492)

Credits:3

To explore ways of prayer and meditation within the western Christian tradition. Through these experiments in prayer one hopes to develop his or her relationship to God and one's sensitivity to the religious dimension of one's everyday life. The course aims to help people notice and articulate their religious experience as a ground and test of their theological reflection. Seminar, weekly journals, final reflection paper. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment]

SPIRITUAL DIRECTION PRACTICUM (SP-2495)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Jane Ferdon and George Murphy. To refine a focus on religious experience in spiritual direction for those engaged in or preparing for this ministry. This course will enable participants to identify, articulate and develop religious experience. Each class will combine theory and practical application to ministry through presentations, verbatims, role plays, case studies, journal exercises and group discussion. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment]

THE ART OF DISCERNMENT (SP-2499)

Credits:1.5

This course treats the theory and practice of personal discernment. It is designed to acquaint the learner with skills for their own discernment, but also assists in/accompany the discernment of others. It will serve those in preparation for a variety of spiritual care ministries, and is required for the Diploma in the Art of Spiritual Direction. Participants will discern an area of their own choosing in their personal lives, participate in contemplative listening dyads, serve as spiritual companions involved in each other's discernment and function as members of a discerning group during the week-long intensive. Prior to arrival, participants are expected to read at least three of the required books and to prepare a draft paper of about 6 pages in length covering the theoretical aspects raised in the readings. They will demonstrate learning during the intensive by revising the draft paper and also by preparing an additional paper of about 6 pages demonstrating the accompaniment of another person who could be a directee (preferred for DASD), parishioner, colleague, friend. Limited to SFTS students only. Class meets daily, 1/14/19-1/18/19, from 8:45am-5:00pm, at SFTS.

SPIRITUALITY OF THOMAS MERTON (SP-2502)

Credits:3

This seminar will explore major insights of Thomas Merton, twentieth-century monk/mystic/prophet. We will consider a variety of themes in his writings, including contemplation, the true self, solitude and solidarity, dialogue with Eastern religions, peacemaking/nonviolence, and ecological awareness. Merton’s quest for personal and societal transformation and his legacy of contemplative-prophetic consciousness will inform our exploration. Reflection papers, class presentations, final paper. [Faculty Consent required; 12 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

RHYTHMS OF THE SPIRIT: CRAFTING A RULE OF LIFE (SP-2518)

Credits:3

In this highly participatory class, you will explore the practice of writing a rule of life that will help you to integrate spiritual practices into your life so that you can be sustained for the long-haul of theological studies and ministry. The concept of a rule comes to us from ancient monastic life. Often these ancient rules were brief, written documents that were intended to help spiritual communities live into their vocations most fully and fruitfully. In this course you will have the opportunity to take the time to prayerfully write your own rule. Your rule will elaborate on eight areas: God, Prayer, Work, Study, Spiritual Companionship, Care of Your Body, Reaching Out, and Hospitality. This course is praxis-oriented, meaning we will engage in our practices and reflect on them together meaningfully. This course draws on resources from Christian faith perspectives; students from all GTU schools and programs are welcome to participate fully from their traditions. At ABSW this course fulfills a requirement in the curricular area of Spirituality & Resilience. I employ a contemplative and liberative pedagogy where students’ voices and experiences are highly valued. Evaluation will be based on regular written assignments, class leadership, final project (your Rule of Life) and its presentation to the class.

SPIRITUAL LIFE AND LEADERSHIP (SP-2527)

Credits:1.5

GROUP SPIRITUAL COMPANIONSHIP. This class will introduce basic listening skills, but from a grounding in the contemplative tradition, rather than from psychology or communication theory. The semester will open with several weeks in which we investigate and practice contemplative prayer, understanding that contemplation invites us to a whole contemplative life-style. We will then learn a simple model for contemplative listening (one week) that we will practice for six subsequent weeks. Participants will take turns relating a present experience, an experience from childhood and a ministry experience. We will also introduce other conversation skills (questions and probes) and conclude with pastoral applications and connections to other semesters of Spiritual Life and Leadership. This course is to learn how to create a hospitable place in which we turn our attention to reflect on our relationship with God, self, others, and all of Creation and follow God’s invitation in every area of our lives.

FUNDMNTLS OF SPIRITUAL DIRECTN (SP-2680)

Credits:0

This course satisfies a core requirement for the diploma and certificate in the art of spiritual direction. Itinvites students to develop the basic attending, responding, assessing, and discernment skills necessary in the practice of spiritual direction. Participants will also explore the dynamics of direction sessions and become conversant with such issues as initial meetings with directees, psychological concerns in direction, special cases, etc. Students will learn about the professional dimensions and responsibilities, which accompany every spiritual direction relationship. Dates TBD.

SWDNBRGN SPRTLTY IN PRACTICES (SP-2720)

Credits:3

This course explores engaged Swedenborgian spirituality through the dimensions of personal practice and applied theology. The horizons of lived experience in a committed Swedenborgian faith practice are pursued via multi-disciplinary resources in Swedenborgian spirituality for group practice in ministry settings. Explorations of applied theology, biblical spirituality, spiritual growth groups, social justice connections, prayer and meditation, and eco-spirituality will be covered. Sessions will involve some lecture and presentation, seminar-style discussions, and some experiential practice. Bias will be towards effective appropriations for practice in ministry. A final research paper or reflection paper (12-15 pages) or pastoral project is due two weeks after last day of class.

CONTEMPLATIVE LISTENING (SP-3502)

Credits:1.5

This course explores the theory and practice of careful listening to others (people, art, music nature, our heart) a variety of techniques and practices to refine our ability to deeply listen. This is the foundation course for the diploma and certificate in spiritual direction and formation. It replaces SP 2465. ENROLLMENT IN THIS COURSE IS LIMITED TO STUDENTS IN THE DIPLOMA OR CERTIFICATE IN THE ART OF SPIRITUAL DIRECTION AT SFTS. Course meets daily, 1/7/19-1/11/19, from 9am-5pm at SFTS.

SPIRITUAL EXERCISE IN CONTEXT (SP-4042)

Credits:3

This course will focus on The Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius of Loyola in its historical, cultural and textual contexts. The Autobiography and the Official Directory of 1599 will support our close reading of the text of The Spiritual Exercises. We will attend to the limits of the adaptability of a classic spiritual text through raising the questions: Where were the women at the time Ignatius was composing the Spiritual Exercises? In the early years of their use? How can this text and process be adapted for today's women (and men)? For those in different ecclesial contexts? For those outside Western cultural contexts? Useful for those specializing in Ignatian Spirituality as well as for those seeking to gain deeper understanding of a spiritual classic that became the basis for the modern retreat movement. Experience of making the Spiritual Exercises in some form desired. Advanced students (that is, most students) will share teaching responsibilities. Learning strategies include reading, discussion, lecture, evaluating electronic sources, moodle-based discussions, class presentations, final paper. [20 max enrollment]

DYNAMICS OF TRAUMA (SP-4055)

Credits:3

In this first course in the Certificate in Trauma and Spiritual Care, students will explore the basic dynamics of trauma from a variety of perspectives: sociological, psychological, psychiatric, neuroscience, relational, theological and spiritual. We will begin by exploring the great variety of trauma events, the demographics of trauma, related studies from the emerging field of traumatology. From the psychological and psychiatric fields we will identify trauma symptoms, and the concept of PTSD and Traumatic Loss. We will learn how to recognize the presence of trauma. Finally, we will explore the theological, spiritual and moral dimensions to trauma and the traumatized person, including the concept of “moral injury.” Along the way, we will touch on implications for the treatment and healing of traumatized persons, but a subsequent course in the certificate program will deal more directly with the dynamics of healing, recovery and treatment. We welcome to this class all who minister to and with traumatized persons. Classes will be held during 4 weekends: 9/7-8, 10/5-6, 11/2-3, 11/30-12/1. Fridays: 6-9pm, Saturdays: 9am-4pm. [Introduction to pastoral care or counseling]

FRANCISDESALES SOURCES&SPIRIT (SP-4571)

Credits:3

St Francis de Sales, Bishop of Geneva from 1602 to 1622, is known as a French-speaking spiritual author and pastoral guide. Few Americans understand his roots in the Italian Renaissance, and how his training in secular environments prepared him for his life mission as one of the foremost Catholic Reformers in the aftermath of the Council of Trent. This course provides the opportunity to examine his principle works as well as lesser known personal writings in an attempt to understand the basis for Salesian spirituality that he (perhaps unknowingly) orginated -- a lay spirituality in the Catholic tradition that paved the way for the reforms of Vatican II. Format: Primary sources studied and discussed in groups; final grade based on research paper.

SPIRITUALITY OF FEMALE MYSTICS (SP-4701)

Credits:3

This seminar will utilize deep reading and round-table dialogue to investigate female authored mystical texts. In the first half of the semester we will study primary sources together, raising questions from the field of spirituality. During the second half of the semester, students will select a female mystic, for example, Beatrice of Nazareth, Teresa of Avila, Hildegard of Bingen, Hadewijch, Jeanne Guyon, Margery Kempe, Julian of Norwich, Catherine of Siena, Mother Teresa, or Simone Weil, whose writings they will examine more deeply. Each participant will select texts to share with the seminar in order to introduce their thesis about the subject's spirituality. We will explore how these intimate friends of God hermeneutically expressed their mystical revelations and approached the implications of their spirituality, theologically and politically. How did they interpret scripture, exegete society, and present their divine revelations, especially in contexts of gender inequality, political instability, and ecclesial restriction? This course is suitable for advanced MA, MTS, and MDiv students, especially those approaching or in thesis-writing stage, and PhD, STL, and STD students.

SPRTL DISCIPLINES EASTERN XTN (SP-4800)

Credits:3

The course will follow a lecture/discussion format as students will study spiritual disciplines of the Eastern Orthodox Tradition. The following subjects will be included - The Jesus Prayer, silence, fasting,Pilgrimage and the Elder, the desert. Readings will be taken from the Patristic Tradition as well as contemporary authors. Students will be required to do two papers and one presentation. Emphasis will be placed on class participation.

DOCTORAL SEMINAR: XTN SPIRTLTY (SP-5090)

Credits:3

This seminar will introduce students to the research field of Christian Spirituality, and to the structure and content of the Doctoral Program (PhD, STD, STL) in Christian Spirituality at the GTU. It will also initiate students into the techniques of research, some methodologies appropriate to the interdisciplinary field and promote skills in organizing and writing. The seminar will be specifically geared to the needs and interests of doctoral and master students in Christian Spirituality but doctoral students from other fields who are interested in the field are welcome. Discussion, lecture, presentation and term paper. [Faculty Consent required; 10 max enrollment]

SPIRITUAL FORMATION LEADERSHP (SPFT-1082)

Credits:3

This course introduces histories, practices, and issues of spiritual formation. The course particularly aims to help students to understand the significant relationship between spirituality and leadership for social change. The course also encourages students to find or create effective spiritual practices for themselves. Selected spiritual practices mainly from Christian traditions and also from other traditions will be introduced with their social and historical contexts and examined critically for their role in contemporary leadership formation. This is a PSR's requirement course for the first-year students in MDiv and MAST programs and students in CSSC. Also, anyone who is interested in the field of spiritual formation and engaged spirituality is welcome. [30 max enrollment]

Chl Spiritual Direction (SPFT-2493)

Credits:1.5

CHI SPIRITUAL DIRECTION II (SPFT-2496)

Credits:1.5

For joint-program students participating in Chaplaincy Institute (ChI) modules as part of the Interfaith Spiritual Direction Certificate. This module is the second of four quarterly classes in the 2018/19 program. The certificate is designed to inspire, nurture and educate those who are called to serve as Spiritual Directors in our increasingly diverse world. Our innovative program focuses on a combination of the study of world religions, an exploration of personal spirituality, and spiritual direction skills….all in a creatively infused context. Each intensive learning module focuses on the development of practical skills and competencies for offering spiritual direction to persons of varying religious beliefs and backgrounds. This immersion in the arts of ministry combines pedagogies of theoretical, practical, and artistic learning. This course is only for students who have been admitted to the SKSM-ChI joint program and is not available to other SKSM students or to students from other GTU schools. This course does not count toward residency requirements. Relates to SKSM Thresholds 1, 5, 6, 8; MFC Competencies 2, 3. Meets 10/22-10/26/18 from 9:00am to 5:00pm. [15 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

SPIRITUAL FORMATION LEADERSHP (SPFT-8182)

Credits:3

This course introduces histories, practices, and issues of spiritual formation. The course particularly aims to help students to understand the significant relationship between spirituality and leadership for social change. The course also encourages students to find or create effective spiritual practices for themselves. Selected spiritual practices mainly from Christian traditions and also from other traditions will be introduced with their social and historical contexts and examined critically for their role in contemporary leadership formation. This is a PSR’s requirement course for the first-year students in MDiv and MAST programs and students in CSSC. Also, anyone who is interested in the field of spiritual formation and engaged spirituality is welcome. This is an online course, which uses Moodle as the class platform and Zoom for plenary sessions. There are four plenary sessions during the semester. The first plenary session takes place on September 15 at 2PM and is required for those who take this class. The dates and times for the rest of the sessions are finalized in the first plenary meeting. [30 max enrollment]

HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN SPIRTLTY (SPHS-2000)

Credits:3

This course will explore classics of Christian spirituality from medieval mysticism to the civil rights movement. Emphasis will be placed on careful reading of primary texts. In addition to shorter papers on specific texts, a term paper will be due at the end of the course.

ORTHODOX XTN SPIRITUALITY (SPHS-4915)

Credits:3

A general introduction to the broad themes of and major figures in Eastern Christian spiritual traditions. Working almost exclusively with primary texts (in English translation), students will encounter a wide range of traditions (Syrian, Greek, Russian, French, and American) from the second century to the present day. Format is seminar. Evaluation will be based on one in-class presentation and a final synthesis paper.

HISTORY OF XTN SPIRITUALITY (SPHS-5000)

Credits:3

This seminar explores primary readings in the classical sources of Christian spirituality from the early, medieval, early modern, and modern periods, as well as secondary readings on the sources and on historical methodology. Emphasis will be on various aspects of the mystical journey including biblical interpretation, asceticism, prayer, apophatic and cataphatic theologies, action/contemplation, visions, personal and social transformation, and union with God. By the end of the course, students will have gained a more detailed knowledge of a select number of topics within the history of Christian spirituality, and should have developed the ability to handle historical material for research projects in the same field. Weekly reflections, a presentation, and a final research paper of 20-25 pages. Primarily intended for PhD, STL, STD, and DMin students but open to advanced masters students with the permission of the instructor.

HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN SPIRTLTY (SPHS-8200)

Credits:3

This course will explore classics of Christian spirituality from medieval mysticism to the civil rights movement. Emphasis will be placed on careful reading of primary texts. In addition to shorter papers on specific texts, a term paper will be due at the end of the course. This is the online version of SPHS-2000.

PAULINE EPISTLES & SPRTLTY (SPNT-2300)

Credits:3

This course offers an introduction to the life, work, and theology of Paul through a deep investigation into the development of his thought in the seven undisputed epistles. While the course will reconstruct Paul’s ministry using historical-critical and literary methods, the course approaches the texts from the field of biblical spirituality. Students will gain competency in charting the chronological history of Paul’s lived experience, particularly his spiritual revelations, missionary ventures, and relationships with various cities and churches. Then, they will dive into topics of biblical spirituality and theology in the writings of Paul, including racism and slavery, gendered oppression/liberation, Paul on the law and anti-Semitism in Pauline exegesis, Paul’s doctrine of justification and inclusivity, missiology, Paul on the flesh and embodiment, sexuality and purity. Competency in Koine Greek not required but welcomed. Suitable for MDiv, MTS, and MA students.

BIBLICAL ISSUES/XTN SPRTLTY (SPOT-4444)

Credits:3

In recent decades some exegetes and theologians have begun to explore how a Hermeneutic of Memory is operative in biblical texts, especially by attending to the post-Auschwitz interpretive task for Scripture. The political theological discourse of Johann Baptist Metz and Dorothee Soelle can open participants to various experiences of suffering in this past century, for their theological enterprise shifted as they explored biblical texts and motifs through the lens of the sufferer of millions during the Nazi genocide of the Jews. One might describe this turn as the self-implicating dimension of their academic research: once the interpreters' lives are intertwined with the memory of unspeakable suffering, the task of interpretation becomes more holistic as it involves their response to life in their study. Some in the field of Spirituality would claim that the self-implicating nature of biblical study is what constitutes the biblical basis of either Jewish or Christian spirituality. Some helpful examples of this hermeneutic turn from interpretation of Psalms, Job, and Lamentations. [Faculty Consent required]

CTSC TRAUMA CARE RESILIENCY (SPPS-2460)

Credits:3

Trauma Care is provided under unique pressures: extreme uncertainty, fear/anxiety, real threat, complexity, time sensitive, political pressure, and public scrutiny in a high consequence environment. Preparation of trauma care givers for this challenge has focused on related knowledge and technical care-giving skills. Yet, researchers have found that competencies for trauma care are largely dimensions of emotional intelligence (EQ). This trauma care course applies the principles of transformative learning to foster EQ growth. The approach requires sufficient time for implicit learning to occur, space for self-reflection and questioning one’s own assumptions, and an environment which supports, confronts and clarifies. In this class, students will learn critical care competencies for trauma care giving including self-awareness, self-management and impulse control, empathy and the ability to attune to others, flexibility, creativity, decision-making and problem-solving, and the ability to engage and inspire others. This course meets at SFTS in San Anselmo for four intensive weekends during the fall semester. Classes will be held during 4 weekends: 9/14-15, 10/12-13, 11/9-10, 12/14-15. Fridays: 6-9pm, Saturdays: 9am-4pm.Please visit www.sfts.edu for more information. Pass/Fail only. [20 max enrollment]

CTSC TRAUMA CARE RESILIENCY (SPPS-4460)

Credits:3

Trauma Care is provided under unique pressures: extreme uncertainty, fear/anxiety, real threat, complexity, time sensitive, political pressure, and public scrutiny in a high consequence environment. Preparation of trauma care givers for this challenge has focused on related knowledge and technical care-giving skills. Yet, researchers have found that competencies for trauma care are largely dimensions of emotional intelligence (EQ). This trauma care course applies the principles of transformative learning to foster EQ growth. The approach requires sufficient time for implicit learning to occur, space for self-reflection and questioning one’s own assumptions, and an environment which supports, confronts and clarifies. In this class, students will learn critical care competencies for trauma care giving including self-awareness, self-management and impulse control, empathy and the ability to attune to others, flexibility, creativity, decision-making and problem-solving, and the ability to engage and inspire others. This course meets at SFTS in San Anselmo for four intensive weekends during the fall semester. Classes will be held during 4 weekends: 9/14-15, 10/12-13, 11/9-10, 12/14-15. Fridays: 6-9pm, Saturdays: 9am-4pm. Please visit www.sfts.edu for more information. [20 max enrollment]

POETRY FOR SPIRITUAL CARE (SPRA-2000)

Credits:3

The practice of reading poetry closely, paying attention to the ways words work, to the surprising purposes of ambiguity, to effects of poetic devices, can enrich the ways we read Scripture, conduct conversations, and widen the repertoire of questions we bring to any text. This course will focus on a variety of kinds of poetry, on reading it, writing it, and practicing ways of integrating the gifts poems offer into pastoral care, preaching, personal spiritual practice, and daily life. Course is available for 1.5-3 units.

FAMILIES & SPIRITUAL PRACTICE (SPRS-8412)

Credits:3

This class will explore ways of strengthening and nurturing families at home, in congregations, and in the community through spiritual practice and care. Practices will include family rituals, sabbath time, prayer, meditation, community service, mindfulness, play, mealtimes, activism, devotion, creativity, nature, and gratitude. Families of all kinds, across the generations, and from different cultural and faith traditions - including students' own families - will receive our attention. Course Format: Classroom discussion. Method of Evaluation: weekly reflections, spiritual practice exercises, and projects. Intended audience (M.Div., MASC, MA). This online course is asynchronous. Low residency. Relates to Threshold #: 5; 7; and 8 MFC Competencies #: 2; 3; and 6 [20 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

SPIRITUALITY OF THE EARTH (SPST-2550)

Credits:3

This new course explores a spirituality that asks: What can we learn from the Earth? How can we pray with the Earth? And how can we take co-responsibility with the Earth for all her inhabitants? The course assumes that the Earth is a source of spiritual and theological reflection; that the natural world, her biodiversity and ecosystemic interdependence, are sources of learning how to live a holistic spirituality in light of the world and the Gospel. The course will explore issues of water, food, and climate, and will integrate eco-feminist and eco-womanist perspectives. Through critical readings, class discussion, film and first-hand exploration and experimentation, students will be able to articulate and practice an Earth-honoring faith that is ecologically truthful, sacramentally expansive, and ethically responsible. A foundational course in theology is a prerequisite. Course intended for MTS, M.Div, and MA students, open to others, auditors with permission of the professor [Faculty Consent required; 15 max enrollment]

INCARNATIONAL THEOLOGY (SPST-3020)

Credits:3

This class will consider the theme of incarnation primarily in a Swedenborgian theological context, though readings from other Christian and non-Christian traditions will be incorporated. We will consider what it means to engage an embodied God, and how divinity manifests in the natural world, the human body and scripture. That right action and engagement in the affairs of the world is the ultimate incarnation, the end goal of all religious learning and practice, will be considered through a Swedenborgian interpretation of key biblical texts. A comparative component will incorporate selections from the Bhagavad Gita, Paul Tillich and Hasidic commentary, not for the sake of drawing generalized analogies, but to broaden our understanding of how the topic has been treated in different contexts.

SRC UPGRADE (SRC-8888)

Credits:1

Upgrading a lower level course to an advanced or doctoral course. Course available for 0.5-12 units.

SRC UPGRADE (SRC-8888)

Credits:3

Upgrading a lower level course to an advanced or doctoral course. Course available for 0.5-12 units.

SRC UPGRADE (SRC-8888)

Credits:12

Upgrading a lower level course to an advanced or doctoral course. Course available for 0.5-12 units.

SPECIAL READING COURSE (SRC-999)

Credits:3

SPECIAL READING COURSE TO BE USED ONLY IN INSTANCES WHERE A STUDENT TAKES TWO READING COURSES IN A GIVEN SEMESTER

SPECIAL READING COURSE (SRC-9999)

Credits:12

A special reading course designed by the student and faculty member. This course must have a special reading course form on file in your Registrar's office in order to receive credit for it. Obtain the form from your Registrar. Course available for 0.5-12 units.

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY I (ST-1084)

Credits:3

The first semester of a two-semester introduction to Christian theology. Beginning with the meaning of religious faith, we move into the method question of the relation between divine revelation and the authority of scripture, human reason and experience. From there, we investigate the meaning of God using ancient and contemporary Trinitarian theology; Reformed theologian John Calvin, feminist theologian Elizabeth Johnson, and Latin American theologian Gustavo Gutierrez. We conclude with differing understandings of creation, and God's relationship to human suffering. Three exams (with option of substituting papers for exams). This course is the prerequisite for ST 1085, Systematic Theology II. [Auditors with Faculty permission]

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY II (ST-1085)

Credits:3

This course is the second semester of a two-semester introduction to Christian theology. The purpose is to help the student gain a basic knowledge of the principal topics of the theology of the universal church, especially as these topics are understood in the Reformed tradition and in conversation with feminist and other contemporary theologies. Beginning with the doctrine of humanity, we look at our original goodness and our fall into relational forms of sin as pride, despair and denial. Next, we look at the person and work of Jesus Christ, from a variety of perspectives. We look deeply at the meaning of our being "saved by grace through faith alone," and the roles of the divine Spirit and human spirit in bringing about our healing. We conclude with the nature of the Christian spiritual life, including sanctification and vocation, the church and its mission in the world and sacraments.

THEOLOGICAL THINKING (ST-1086)

Credits:3

Theology concerns words, wordings, the Word, or speech about the divine. Long ago, Anselm defined theology as faith seeking understanding. This course offers a space to continue a search that humans have engaged in for millenia—making sense of faith, and the Christian faith in particular. We will learn from the wisdom and the shortcomings of those who have preceded us in seeking to talk meaningfully and responsibly about various theological topics and how they help one to think about social transformation. In addition, we will learn from contemporary quests and concerns as we become active participants in the theological process today.

THEOLOGY: NATURE & METHOD (ST-1091)

Credits:3

This course (formerly titled “ST-1710 Theology: Method & Structure”) is an introduction to the nature, method, sources, and structure of theology, focusing on (but not limited to) the Roman Catholic tradition and the work of St. Thomas Aquinas in particular. Issues to be considered include: the nature of theology, its method, the relationship between philosophy and theology, the theology of revelation, and the respective roles of scripture, tradition, magisterium, faith, and reason in theology. The course also introduces students to writing research papers in theology. Format: Lecture & discussion, with some student presentations. Assignments for evaluation: (a) class participation; (b) oral reports; (c) one research paper proposal (without such a paper itself); and (d) exams. Intended audience: MA, MDiv, and MTS students.

INTRO TO SWEDENBORGIAN THGT (ST-1550)

Credits:3

Centering especially in Swedenborg’s two-volume summa, True Christianity (1771), we will explore systematically Swedenborgian theology in an overview fashion. In addition to engaging Swedenborg’s thought in this classic work, we will also situate his ideas and topics in the context of historical Christian theology, and at all times we will consider spirituality interpretations for the practice of ministry in the contemporary moment. Seminar style. Two student presentations; six 2-page papers; final research paper. Intended audience: M.Div., M.T.S. Can be upgraded for M.A., D.Min, and Ph.D. Course scheduling TBD based upon student availability.

POLITICAL THEOLOGY IN THE CONTEXT OF AFRICA (ST-2013)

Credits:3

Since the second Vatican Council, Catholic theology has passed through very determining developments. Some even claimed that theology has successfully negotiated the turning of a more classical approach to a more interdisciplinary way of theologizing. From an African perspective, the renewal of faith has also engaged theologians to think Christian faith in relation to the world in the move, which is in taking into account the social and political dimensions of faith. Thanks to the work of theologians such as J. B. Metz and J. Moltmann, attention has been called to de-privatize God-talk and to interpret faith as incarnated in the world. This course provides insights and meanings of political theology in an African context. More specifically it will address ways of God seeking in the midst of various situations, and how the particular context of Africa is a theological locus. Experiences of suffering and hope, reconciliation and justice, peace and conflicts resolution, among others, will highlight the ongoing interpretation of faith in African societies. Suitable for MDiv, MTS and MA; can be upgraded for STL and STD.

FOUNDATIONS OF THEOLOGY (ST-2014)

Credits:3

This course examines the nature and function of theology through a systematic inquiry into the dynamics of faith and revelation, the role of scripture and tradition, the use of religious language and symbols, the genesis of doctrine, the operation of theological method, and the relationship of theology to praxis. This course introduces basic theological concepts and terms, exposes students to some major theologians and theological styles, and situates the study of theology in the life and ministry of the Church. For these reasons, this course can serve as an introduction to the study of theology. It is designed for MDiv students and others in first degree programs (MA, MTS, etc.). This course will use a flipped classroom format with lectures viewed on the course website and discussions conducted in class. Students will be evaluated through short papers, class participation, and a final exam.

CONTEMP ANGLICAN THEOLOGIANS (ST-2029)

Credits:3

This course will examine the work of several Anglican-identified theologians treating a variety of themes and topics. This will allow us to encounter and learn from the many ways in which Anglican theologies are engaged theologies, theologies that challenge us to rethink how we imagine and interact with both church and world, and that provoke deep transformations in the lived life of faith. This is a seminar course focused on close reading and discussion of texts by Sarah Coakley, Kelly Brown Douglas, Jay Emerson Johnson, William Stringfellow, Kathryn Tanner, Keith Ward, and Rowan Williams, along with a few stand-alone articles. The requirements are active classroom participation and a research paper of 18–20 pages on the work of an Anglican theologian not encountered directly in the course readings, selected in consultation with the instructor. The course is appropriate for students in all degree programs and there are no prerequisites. Low-residency and fully online students are welcome to register and participate via Zoom.

INTRODUCTION TO THEOLOGY (ST-2160)

Credits:3

The course emphasizes liberatory, and contemporary thought, through brief but in-depth encounters with historically pivotal or influential essays, texts, thinkers, and ideas. Students will learn to use and interpret basic theological concepts and models, using traditional vocabularies (doctrine of God, creation, theological anthropology, Christology, suffering and evil, soteriology, pneumatology, eschatology) by engaging a variety of theological texts critically and creatively. Students will be invited to participate as theologians while gaining a sense of how theology is a temporal, contextual, ongoing and imaginative endeavor, in which present articulations are flooded with, produced by, argue with, extend, contradict, and depart from inherited claims about the relations between God, Jesus/Christ, the Holy Spirit, humanity, life, and the universe(s). Course format: Lecture and discussion. Evaluation: Class participation, Moodle posting, 2 brief papers and term paper.

THLGY I:INTRODUCING PRACTICE (ST-2188)

Credits:3

THEOLOGY I: INTRODUCING THE PRACTICE. This course is the first in a two-course sequence that introduces students to the core topics and methods of Christian systematic theology. Although special emphasis is placed on the Anglican tradition, students encounter the central theologians and theological perspectives necessary for an adequate foundation in Christian theology. In this first course, the theological topics considered are: God, creation, Trinity, christology, theological anthropology, sin and salvation, grace, and pneumatology. The course is taught primarily as a seminar, with the instructor presenting material that is then discussed in depth by the class in order to elucidate the salient terms, debates, and themes of the topic at hand. Writing assignments consisting of reading response papers on class readings and short essays, also based on class readings, are the central requirements.

CONSTRUCTIVE THEOLOGY (ST-2225)

Credits:3

In this course you will be introduced to the work of constructive/systematic theology – its methods, its sources, and its expressions in various faith communities. You will consider the doctrines of the Christian tradition in their biblical, historical and present-day developments; interacting with voices both ancient and contemporary from a variety of communities, contexts and concerns. Together we will learn how to engage the work of theology today, using the resources of our Christian traditions and other scholarly disciplines for the sake of developing the systematic/constructive habitus you will need in order to serve as theological leaders in a variety of communities and ministries. Discussion and lecture format. Three written assignments [research paper/constructive project/credo essay] and class participation form the bases of student assessment. [30 max enrollment]

HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF CHRISTOLOGY (ST-2232)

Credits:3

The primary purpose of this lecture course (designed for the MA/MDiv/MTS levels) is to survey the main lines of Christological development from the earliest Patristic writers through Aquinas. The areas of particular concentration will be the Patristic development from Nicea to Constantinople III and Aquinas' Christology and soteriology. Its secondary purpose is to survey the main lines of Marian doctrine, both as it has evolved historically, as it is being revisioned by contemporary authors. Modern and contemporary developments in Christology, including the various ^Quests^ of the historical Jesus, will be covered in ST 3115, Contemporary Christology, in the spring semester of 2016. The requirements for the course are attendance, and 20 pages of written work distributed over three essays. NOTE: this course is a prerequisite for ST 3115. [Auditors with Faculty permission]

TRINITY (ST-2300)

Credits:3

Beginning with the scriptural understanding of the Trinity, the course will trace the development of the doctrine, especially in the theology of Thomas Aquinas, and then examine certain contemporary approaches to the doctrine against that background (Schleiermacher, Barth, Rahner, Moltmann, Boff, LaCugna). [Lecture/discussion. One 15-20 page research paper or two 7-10 page research papers.] (MA/MTS/MDiv)

THEOLOGY OF THE CROSS (ST-2320)

Credits:3

In this seminar style course, we will consider the problem of the cross in Christian theology, discipleship, and pastoral practice. As a course in systematic theology, we will look at texts within the tradition and seek to analyze the way or ways the cross functions within particular theologians and theological systems. The course will rely heavily on class participation, a set of small take home essays for the mid-term, and a major final assignment. The final assignment will have options around its format, including multi-media, a sermon series and reflections, or a research paper. Ultimately, the students will answer the question as part of their final assignment: "Is the Cross redeemable"? The course is intended for all Master's level students including MA, MTS, and MDIV. [12 max enrollment]

INTRODUCING ECCLESIOLOGY (ST-2458)

Credits:3

This lecture course is an introduction to ecclesiology. We will survey biblical, historical, cultural, and theological resources for the understanding of the Christian churches, with particular emphasis on ecumenical concerns and global perspectives. By considering the social and cultural contexts, we will survey the various ways in which the Christian community has understood itself historically, and the polar tensions that have perdured into the present. Among the issues to be discussed are the purpose or mission of the Church, its relationship to the world, and the interaction between global and local churches. The class is taught from a Roman Catholic perspective with cross reference to Protestant and Orthodox ecclesiologies. Foundation course for MDiv and MTS students. ThM/STL/STD students should consult with the instructor for a semi-independent coursework on ecclesiology SRC-8888. [20 max enrollment]

THLGY II:DEEPNING THE PRACTICE (ST-2488)

Credits:3

THEOLOGY II: DEEPENING THE PRACTICE. This course is the second in a two-course sequence that introduces students to the core topics and methods of Christian systematic theology. Although special emphasis is placed on the Anglican tradition, students encounter the central theologians and theological perspectives necessary for an adequate foundation in Christian theology. In this final course, the theological topics considered are: church, sacraments, Christianity and interreligious relations, eschatology, theological method, and hermeneutics. The course is taught primarily as a seminar, with the instructor presenting material that is then discussed in depth by the class in order to elucidate the salient terms, debates, and themes of the topic at hand. Writing assignments consisting of reading response papers on class readings and short essays, also based on class readings, are the central requirements.

THEOLOGIES OF LIBERATION (ST-2547)

Credits:3

Beginning with the Latin American Catholic experience of liberation after the Second Vatican Council, this course offers students the theological method to examine liberative aspects within ecclesial movements such as comunidades de base. The North American, Asian, and African context will be examined in-depth with important social justice themes including marginalization, migration, trauma, etc. In the first part of the course, students will engage Latin American liberation thought through the works of Gustavo Gutiérrez, Jon Sobrino, Paolo Freire, and CELAM. In the second part of the course, students will engage the stages of development within a specific context–in order to critique as well as to construct–a spirituality of liberation. The final portion of the course allows students to further imagine the emergence of theologies of liberation by comparing movements from various regions of the world. A Spring Break immersion from March 23 to 30, 2019 to the El Paso, TX/Ciudad Juárez, Mexico border is part of the course requirements. Admission is limited to 10 students. Students will be expected to pay for their airfare; room and board expenses for JST students will be covered by the school budget. This course is suitable for all programs and can be upgraded if necessary.

THEOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (ST-2645)

Credits:3

Theological Anthropology studies the reality and mystery of our human existence in light of Christian traditions of philosophy, theology and scripture, with a particular focus on the Catholic tradition. It attempts a foundational theological inquiry into human self-understanding, including concepts of person, affectivity, sexuality, individuality and community. This examination will also be informed by what we know from contemporary social and natural sciences. A major portion of the course will consider examine the human-divine relationship through the Christian narratives of creation-redemption, grace-sin, and the final fulfillment of human existence. Discussions in the course will invite dialogue with perspectives on the human person offered by non-Christian religions. [20 max enrollment]

INTRODUCTION TO ESCHATOLOGY (ST-2661)

Credits:3

This foundational course takes as its starting point Monika Hellwig’s definition of eschatology as “the systematic reflection on the content of our Christian hope.” In addition to examining the scriptural sources and classical patristic and medieval developments of theologies of “the last things” (death, judgment, heaven, hell, and purgatory, and the general resurrection), we will explore contemporary pastoral and social dimensions of eschatology in terms of liturgy, ecclesiology, and social justice. The course is intended for MDiv students and others in first-degree programs (MA, MTS, etc.) with a built-in option to upgrade to the 4000 level for STL and doctoral students. This course will use a lecture/discussion format with occasional guest speakers. Assessment is based on class presentations, short writing assignments, and a final paper. STL and doctoral students with the upgrade will submit a 20-25 page paper on a topic within eschatology relevant to their own research and approved by the instructor. [Auditors with faculty permission]

CONTEMPORARY CHRISTOLOGY (ST-3115)

Credits:3

This lecture course (designed for the MA/MDiv/MTS levels) will trace the modern development of the various "Quests of the Historical Jesus" (First, Second, Third), with particular emphasis on Edward Schillebeeckx' hermeneutical and theological principles and James Dunn's historical Christology, as well as on several other important "Third Quest" figures (Crossan, Brown, Meier, Wright, Theissen, and Sanders). Requirements for the class are regular attendance, and 20 pages of writing (to be distributed over three essays assigned by the instructor). The prerequisite fo the class is to have completed ST 2232 (Historical Development of Christology) or its equivalent (work assuring a fairly comprehensive knowledge of the Patristic/conciliar development of Christology from Ignatius of Antioch through Constantinople III, and of Aquinas' understanding of the hypostatic union in the framework of his metaphysics of "esse"). [ST 2232 or equivalent; PFaculty Consent required; Auditors with Faculty permission]

THEOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (ST-3128)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to historical and contemporary issues in Christian anthropology, with an emphasis on the theology of Thomas Aquinas. It will consider (a) the human person created in the image of God, according to the states characterized by innocence, sin, law, grace, and glory; (b) historical justification & nature/grace controversies; and (c) hope & eschatology. Format: Lecture & discussion. Requirements: (a) class participation; (b) two essays, based on the readings, of 1500 to 3000 words, and (c) two popular-style short articles (suitable for a weblog, bulletin, or popular periodical), based on the readings, on topics covered in the course, each of which shall be 600 to 1500 words in length. Intended Audience: M.A., M.Div., and M.T.S. students; other graduate students admitted upon request.

CAN ESCHATOLOGY BE SAVED? (ST-3462)

Credits:3

An examination of the history and contemporary importance of Christian eschatological and apocalyptic theological understandings as they apply to both the practices of ministry and academic religious scholarship. Beginning with a brief introduction to the eschatological/ apocalyptic understandings contained in Islam, Mormonism, Judaism and Evangelical Fundamentalism (from practitioners), this course takes up the work of Barbara Rossing, Jurgen Moltmann, and others who seek to offer an eschatology that emphasizes divine "adventus" over against those eschatologies that emphasize mere "futurum." Lecture and discussion, with a project/paper. Students preparing for ministry are encouraged to prepare either a sermon series or education curriculum project. MA and PhD students are encouraged to prepare a research paper in consultation with the professor. [Any intro course in systematic theology; 30 max enrollment]

CONSTRUCTIVE THEOLOGY (ST-4150)

Credits:3

In this capstone course, students will engage in a process of coming to understand themselves as life-long theological readers and writers in service to whatever form their life and ministry may take after seminary. Through encounters with classical and contemporary Christian theological themes, students will have ample opportunity to grapple with and articulate their own constructive theologies in conversation with others. These conversations will be supported and enabled through regular written assignments, class discussion, and prayerful disciplines. The course will culminate with a final essay. This course is taught from a commitment to liberative pedagogy (see bell hooks and Paulo Friere) and is a blend of active learning, discussion, and interactive lecture where students’ voices and journeys are valued. This is a required course for ABSW students nearing the end of their degree program. Students from other GTU schools are most welcome and encouraged to participate in this course.

VATICAN II: THEOLOGICAL IMPORT (ST-4152)

Credits:3

Lecture/Seminar on the theological content of the Second Vatican Council, detailed study of its major documents, exploring the historical context and commentaries, and its influence on ecumenical and inter-religious dialogue. The importance of this Council is still being explored fifty years after its completion, expecially through the pontificate of Pope Francis. Weekly papers, class presentations, final paper. Designed for advanced MDiv students, MA/STL, STD/PhD students.. [Faculty Consent required; 25 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

CROSS-CULTURAL CHRISTOLOGIES (ST-4184)

Credits:3

This seminar course is a cross-cultural approach to Christology. By considering the social and cultural contexts of Euro-American, Latin American, African, and Asian Christians, we will survey the various ways that these communities have experienced the person and work of Jesus Christ. In addition, we will look at the non-Christian views of Christ (e.g., Buddhist, Hindu, Jewish and Muslim). With an emphasis on ecumenical concerns and global perspectives, we will bring new perspectives and responses to the old question that Christ posed to his followers: "Who do you say that I am?" Open primarily for advanced master and doctoral students. [Faculty Consent required; 15 max enrollment]

THEOLOGY OF THE HOLY SPIRIT (ST-4205)

Credits:3

This class examines the historical development of the doctrine of the Holy Spirit. Initially, it will trace the emergence of the Spirit from testimonies in the Biblical times and Early Christian writings. After that it will turn to the Classical Antiquity’s construction of Pneumatological doctrine in light of Trinitarian controversies, and medieval scholastic and mystical experiences of the Spirit. Finally, concluding appraisals of contemporary Pneumatological doctrines will explore and relate the presence of the Spirit to existing social, political, scientific, and ecological discussions. Overall, this class will ecumenically engage the doctrine of the Spirit as developed in the Roman Catholic, Orthodox, and broader Protestant traditions. At the same time, the course will seek to transcend these ecclesial boundaries, charting the presence of the Spirit “who blows where it will,” and placing the broader theological discussion within inter-religious and interdisciplinary studies. The format of the course will be a seminar style, with discussion of the assigned readings, student presentations, and lectures by the instructor. It is open to all MDiv/MA/STL students, although doctoral students may also attend. This course is taught by PhD student Ivan Vuksanovic with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Thomas Cattoi.

THEOLOGY OF SUFFERING (ST-4419)

Credits:3

Seminar on theological interpretations of suffering, drawing on biblical, theological, literary and artistic expressions of the human drama. Weekly reading and viewing assignments, informed discussion and summary papers; class presentations. Intended for advanced MDiv, MA/STL/PhD/STD students. [Faculty Consent required; 15 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY II (ST-8109)

Credits:3

This course is the second semester of a two-semester introduction to Christian theology. The purpose is to help the student gain a basic knowledge of the principal topics of the theology of the universal church, especially as these topics are understood in the Reformed tradition and in conversation with feminist and other contemporary theologies. Beginning with the doctrine of humanity, we look at our original goodness and our fall into relational forms of sin as pride, despair and denial. Next, we look at the person and work of Jesus Christ, from a variety of perspectives. We look deeply at the meaning of our being "saved by grace through faith alone," and the roles of the divine Spirit and human spirit in bringing about our healing. We conclude with the nature of the Christian spiritual life, including sanctification and vocation, the church and its mission in the world and sacraments. This course is the online version of ST-1085.

CONTEXTUAL CHRISTOLOGIES (ST-8210)

Credits:3

THLGY I: INTRODUCING PRACTICE (ST-8218)

Credits:3

THEOLOGY I: INTRODUCING THE PRACTICE. This course is the first in a two-course sequence that introduces students to the core topics and methods of Christian systematic theology. Although special emphasis is placed on the Anglican tradition, students encounter the central theologians and theological perspectives necessary for an adequate foundation in Christian theology. In this first course, the theological topics considered are: God, creation, Trinity, christology, theological anthropology, sin and salvation, grace, and pneumatology. The course is taught primarily as a seminar, with the instructor presenting material that is then discussed in depth by the class in order to elucidate the salient terms, debates, and themes of the topic at hand. Writing assignments consisting of reading response papers on class readings and short essays, also based on class readings, are the central requirements.

THEOLOGY AS LIVING CONVERSATION (ST-8284)

Credits:3

In this online theology course, students will be introduced to the complex and diverse discipline of Christian theology, conceived as a living conversation that takes place across time and cultures. The course will encourage students to claim their own places in this living conversation, and to grow into their identities as valued, theological conversation contributors, self-aware of their own social and cultural locations. Students will engage various theological methods including ordinary theology, practical theology, liturgical theology, systematic/constructive theology, science and theology, and public theology. Students’ understandings will be assessed through written work, online discussion forums, a media-appropriate project (for example Twitter/Storify, blog, letter to the editor, newsletter article, etc.) and an imaginative dialogue with a theologian. The course will be taught from a commitment to liberative pedagogy (see bell hooks and Paulo Friere) in which students’ voices and experiences are encouraged and valued. This course is appropriate for MDiv, MCL, STM, and MA students, and satisfies the required core theology course for Junior Colloquium at American Baptist Seminary of the West. Students from across the Graduate Theological Union are most welcome and encouraged to take the course.

THEOLOGY II: DEEPENING THE PRACTICE (ST-8288)

Credits:3

THEOLOGY II: DEEPENING THE PRACTICE. This course is the second in a two-course sequence that introduces students to the core topics and methods of Christian systematic theology. Although special emphasis is placed on the Anglican tradition, students encounter the central theologians and theological perspectives necessary for an adequate foundation in Christian theology. In this final course, the theological topics considered are: church, sacraments, Christianity and interreligious relations, eschatology, theological method, and hermeneutics. The course is taught primarily as a seminar, with the instructor presenting material that is then discussed in depth by the class in order to elucidate the salient terms, debates, and themes of the topic at hand. Writing assignments consisting of reading response papers on class readings and short essays, also based on class readings, are the central requirements.

UNITARIAN UNIVERSAL THEOLOGY (ST-8301)

Credits:3

Unitarian Universalist Theologies: This reading-intensive online course grounds its exploration in the fundamentals of liberal theology, through a survey of Unitarian Universalist voices. Its main purpose is to engage those considering UU ministry in the practice of theological reflection while exploring some of the historical, philosophical, and theological contexts shaping Unitarian Universalism as we know it today. This course is not intended to replace a class in systematic theology. Students will be expected to complete the reading, write a brief weekly reading response, and participate in dialogue about personal and spiritual responses to the topics each week. All students are required to submit a final paper on their own personal theology. Prerequisites: A) a systematic theology class or B) UU History before or concurrently with this course. Relates to Starr King Threshold 1 and MFC Competency 6. This course is online only. Students must contact the instructor via e-email prior to enrolling in order to receive permission to register. Registration is contingent upon faculty approval. [Faculty Consent required; 25 max enrollment]

CHRISTOLOGY:ANCIENT & MODERN (ST-8391)

Credits:3

The first sessions of the course will explore the formative developments of Christology in the early centuries of the church, exploring how the Christological diversity of the New Testament is constrained towards the more metaphysical debates leading to Chalcedon (451). We shall then examine the extent to which the definition of Chalcedon truly answers the questions it seeks to settle, and briefly considers the later fate of “Antiochene” and “Alexandrian” emphases in Scholastic and Protestant Christology, focusing especially on the communication of idioms. We will then turn to the "liberal" Protestant critique of Chalcedonianism and compare it with a variety of modified Chalcedonian positions in the contemporary period, including feminist/ liberationist approaches. The course will conclude with a discussion of black/Asian/Latin American approaches, emphasizing the need to reinterpret the Chalcedonian idiom in different cultural contexts. [Faculty Consent required]

PUBLIC THEOLOGY (STCE-3100)

Credits:3

BELOVED (CHRISTIAN) COMMUNITY (STCE-3400)

Credits:3

What distinctive contributions can theological ideas make to communities of faith committed to social change? How can we think in explicitly theological ways about the cultural and political constructions of race, gender, and sexuality, especially as these intersect and intertwine? Can religious leaders effectively critique the social systems in which whey they are embedded and the (religious) institutions on which they often rely for support? Drawing on various forms of social analysis, this course invites constructive theological work rooted in Josiah Royce’s notion of “the Beloved Community,” around which Martin Luther King, Jr., shaped his own work for civil rights and social transformation. We will aim to think theologically about the ethical challenges in sustaining counter-cultural expressions of the Beloved Community in diverse contexts. Lectures, discussion, and presentations will culminate in a final project suitable for a variety of vocational paths. (This course is also offered on-line as STCE 8340.)

RACISM, THEOLOGY & JUSTICE (STCE-3500)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Alison Benders and Simon Kim. This course examines the structural racism in American culture as a theological problem in itself and as antithetical to Catholic social teaching. The course has three moments (modules) that are undergirded by students’ immersion experience from New Orleans to Atlanta, during fall break. Module 1: RACE orients students to the history and complexity of ‘race’, ‘racism’, and hierarchies of privilege and supremacy in the US and the world. Module 2: THEOLOGY examines theological resources that expose racism as a distortion (sin/social sin) and then explores a reconstructed anthropology that might dislodge racial biases within traditional theologies. Module 3: JUSTICE asks what has happened and what might happen to bring about a more racially just society, with a particular focus on Catholic Social Teaching. There is a 10-day immersion from October 20 to 28, 2018 to the Southern region of the U.S. for a deeper exposure to past and current issues around race, including: - Plantation & Slave Trade (New Orleans) - Pettus Bridge March (Selma) - Bus Boycott, National Memorial for Peace and Justice (Montgomery) - Birmingham Jail (Birmingham) - MLK Memorial (Atlanta) Admission limited to 10 students. Students will be expected to pay for their airfare; room and board expenses for JST will be covered by the school budget. Please contact A. Benders or S. Kim (sckim@scu.edu) for application process. [12 max enrollment]

ASTROTHEOLOGY AND ASTROETHICS (STCE-4005)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Ted Peters and Robert Russell. This course will focus on the implications of cosmology, evolutionary biology and astrobiology/extraterrestrial intelligent life for Christian theology and ethics. Scientific topics include Big bang cosmology, the discovery of habitable exoplanets, evolutionary biology, human origins, astrobiology and the search for extraterrestrial life. theological and ethical topics include God, creation, Christology, eschatology and astroethics. The course counts in the Theology and Science concentration within the Department of Theology and Ethics. Doctoral students can upgrade to 5000 level. Advanced M.Div. and other masters' level students are invited, especially with background in the basics of theology. A science background is not required. Doctoral students may upgrade from 4000 to 5000 level and write in their field of focus. On-line students will follow the same sequence of assignments but with threaded forum discussions rather than in-person seminar discussion. [A grounding knowledge of Christian history and theology, and introductory classes in theology. Auditors for In-Seminar only with faculty permission]

THEOLOGY OF MOLTMANN AND PANNENBERG (STCE-4364)

Credits:3

This course is co-taught by Ted Peters and Robert Russell. Read. Think. Discuss. This seminar will examine with appreciation the broad scope and cardinal themes in systematic theology as constructed by Jurgen Moltmann (Reformed) and Wolfhart Pannenberg (Lutheran). Key to unlocking both figures is eschatology, which opens up the ethics of revolution (liberation, political theology) along with other doctrinal loci, especially creation and anthropology. Special attention will be given to proleptic ethics in the dialectic of time and eternity. Advanced M.A. and M. Div. students (beyond the basic systematic theology course) will find these two thinkers exciting, while Ph.D and Th.D. students will find them fundamental to further theological construction. Student evaluation will be based on active class participation plus a research paper. Students may follow either the Residence in-class seminar or the Flexible Life online offering, not both. [A grounding knowledge of Christian history and theology, and introductory classes in theology. Auditors with faculty permission]

Mujerista TheoEthics (STCE-4550)

Credits:3

Mujerista and Latina Feminist TheoEthics: This intensive seminar surveys the rich contributions of Mujerista and Latina Feminist scholars to theologies of liberation. We will explore Latin@ / Hispanic ethnic identity formations; consider the impact of transnational identities in the global North and global South to this work; engage the formative writings of Ada María Isasi-Díaz, María Pilar Aquino, Ivone Gebara and others; and acknowledge their interconnections to Womanist thought. There will be significant advanced reading for this course, but there will not be a final paper. Grades will be determined primarily through class participation. Pre-requisite: ECO Core Intensive or equivalent. Relates to SKSM thresholds 1, 2, and 6 and MFC Competencies 1, 6, and 7. This course is high residency only. Students must contact the instructor via e-email prior to enrolling in order to receive permission to register. Registration is contingent upon faculty approval.

GOD AND CAPITAL (STCE-4777)

Credits:3

This course will explore the relation between theology and economics in contemporary Christian theological discussions. The class begins with a study of Marx’s Capital and then moves to an investigation of different forms of approaching the relation between theology and the economy. Through the readings, lectures and class debate, students will be invited to address economic issues theologically and employ the Christian imaginary critically in light of the economic problems facing our societies. As a three credit hour class, students will be expected to devote nine hours of work outside of class in reading and writing assignments.

THEOLOGY AND ETHICS SEMINAR (STCE-6007)

Credits:3

FOUNDATIONAL THEMES IN THEOLOGY & ETHICS AND THEIR SOCIAL, ECONOMIC, AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPLICATIONS. This course is co-taught by Jay Johnson and Rita Sherma and co-offered by Graduate Theological Union and Pacific School of Religion. This seminar introduces first year doctoral students to foundational themes, texts, and concepts outlining the contemporary study of Theology and Ethics. Theology is variously experienced and expressed in religions – systemic, mythopoetic, mystical, textual, aesthetic, ethical, emotive, and embodied. There are categories of theology that cross all boundaries and yet every religion has its own unique theological themes and frameworks as well. Students will explore interreligious doctrinal frameworks as well as the diverse conduits through which theology is understood and delivered. Ethics is also a discipline in its own right with particular frameworks. Particular attention is paid to theological sources of justice and virtue ethics in terms of their value as social, economic, and environmental implications. Featured guest lectures and in-class student interactive forums offer additional opportunities for negotiating the field through interdisciplinary and interreligious pathways. An attitude that is open to understanding the relationship of systematic to constructive theology, and learning about other faiths will be a helpful asset. The course will require written reflections on readings and a term paper. This is a Departmental Doctoral Seminar and appropriate for PhD, DMin, and PhD students. Course meets in the Collaborative Learning Space at the GTU Library.

BELOVED (CHRISTIAN) COMMUNITY (STCE-8340)

Credits:3

What distinctive contributions can theological ideas make to communities of faith committed to social change? How can we think in explicitly theological ways about the cultural and political constructions of race, gender, and sexuality, especially as these intersect and intertwine? Can religious leaders effectively critique the social systems in which whey they are embedded and the (religious) institutions on which they often rely for support? Drawing on various forms of social analysis, this course invites constructive theological work rooted in Josiah Royce’s notion of “the Beloved Community,” around which Martin Luther King, Jr., shaped his own work for civil rights and social transformation. We will aim to think theologically about the ethical challenges in sustaining counter-cultural expressions of the Beloved Community in diverse contexts. Lectures, discussion, and presentations will culminate in a final project suitable for a variety of vocational paths.

Greening Your Church (STCE-8900)

Credits:3

Greening the Church: Theological and Practical Foundations - This online course with the overall theme of a Summer of love extends the Golden Rule of love of neighbor to love of God's creation. It explores the pastoral and theological foundations and eco-resource to prepare yourself and your church to become a "Climate Church" in the 21st century, exploring themes of climate change, environmental racism, prophetic preaching, ritual protests and civil disobedience, and networking with interfaith and green organizations for collaborative work for environmental care and justice

STD COMPREHENSIVES (STD-6600)

Credits:12

For JST STD students only. Available for 1-12 credits.

STD DISSERTATION PREPARATION (STD-6601)

Credits:12

For JST STD students only. Available for 1-12 credits.

THEO COURSE DESIGN/TEACHING (STED-4500)

Credits:3

Designed primarily for STL and STD students, but open to others interested in preparing themselves to teach theology or religious studies in seminary and university settings, this teaching and learning seminar provides the participants an opportunity to sharpen their pedagogical skills. Reguirements include designing a syllabus suitable to one's setting along with an implementation of some of its parts such as the preparing of lectures, facilitating class discussions (in some cases about the readings the students will have assigned), and creating methods of evaluation, such as testing and grading. In addition, guest lecturers will share their ^best pedagogical practices.^ [Faculty Consent required; 12 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

THEOLOGY OF INTERFAITH DIALOG (STHR-4055)

Credits:3

This seminar course is an exploration of how religious pluralism may find a place in Christian theology. The course will explore various historical and contemporary approaches to and understandings of theology of religions and interreligious dialogue. The phenomenon of multiple religious identity and the implications for contemporary missiology will also be discussed. Students will undertake and reflect on their own dialogue with a member of another religion. Course requirements include weekly critical reading and on-line discussion; field work; in-class presentation and leading class discussion; mid-term project; and a final project. [15 max enrollment]

20TH & 21ST C. ROMAN CATHOLIC THEOLOGIES (STHS-4141)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to currents in 20th-century and 21st-century Roman Catholic theology, including overviews of pre-conciliar neoscholasticism, the efforts labeled as “nouvelle theologie,” results from and reactions to Vatican-II, as well as more recent developments such as post-modern, personalistic, and analytic theologies, and recent Thomistic theology. A significant portion of the course content will be determined by the participants' interests. Format: Lecture/discussion and student-led seminar. Requirements: presentations, and a research paper of 5000-7000 words. Intended Audience: Advanced MA Theology and doctoral students; advanced MDiv or other graduate students admitted with instructor’s permission.

TRINITARIAN THEOLOGY (STHS-4188)

Credits:3

The purpose of the course is to provide an overview of the development of Trinitarian theology, from its gradual emergence in the early Christian period all the way to the present. The first sessions of the course will explore the Cappadocian contribution to the understanding of Trinity as well as Augustine's Trinitarian teaching and its reception. We will then explore the Scholastic and Palamite rendition of early Trinitarian theology and continue with a sample of modern and contemporary approaches across denominational divides, including feminist and contextual appropriations of the traditional teaching. The course will conclude with a discussion of interreligious approaches to Trinitarian theology, emphasizing the need to reinterpret the Trinitarian idiom in different cultural contexts. The lecture/seminar course is open to all MDiv/MA/STL students, though doctoral students may also attend. [20 max enrollment]

MARIOLOGY IN DIALOGUE (STHS-4305)

Credits:3

The goal of this lecture/seminar course is to explore the development of Mariology from its inception to the present, and then engage in conversation with Hindu and Buddhist reflection on the divine feminine. The first few sessions will study the trajectory of Mariology in the early centuries of the church, underscoring how Mariology mirrors and complements analogous developments in Christology, and then move on to chart the development of Medieval and Counter-reformation Mariology in the West, as well as the different trends in Byzantine and Russian thought. In the second part of the course, the course will explore Hindu speculative and devotional approaches to the worship of the goddess, as well as the role of Buddhist female deities and bodhisattvas in Mahayana and Vajrayana Buddhism. Students will be encouraged to reflect on the points of contact, as well as the differences between Christian Mariology on one hand, and Hindu and Buddhist theologies of the divine feminine on the other. Weekly reflections, a presentation and a final research paper of 20-25 pages. The course is primarily intended for advanced master students, but doctoral students are also welcome to attend.

STL THESIS (STL-5500)

Credits:9

For JST STL students only. Course available for 3-9 units.

SACRAMENTAL THEOLOGY (STLS-2099)

Credits:3

This course will employ a systematic view of the nature of the sacraments, the sacramental economy as a way the Church understands created reality, the community of faith, the individual believer within that Body of Christ, and the seven sacraments that give expression to the Church as basic sacrament. Particular attention will be given to the reform of Roman Catholic sacramental life that shaped and were developed after Vatican II, as well as the emerging issues of cultural diversity and the unity of the Church in a global reality. Post-modern critiques of classical sacramental theology will also be examined, as well as contemporary pastoral challenges of sacramental ministry. The structure will be lecture and discussion, with accompanying written assignments that relate to the ministerial and life contexts of participants. [Faculty Consent required; Auditors with Faculty Permission]

YOGA OF SACRED LOVE IN HINDU THEOLOGY (STLS-2154)

Credits:3

This course focuses on the Yoga of Love known as bhakti or “religion of the heart.” By this we mean the specific poetic expressions, the scriptural narratives or the theological explications of love as the way of uniting (yoga) with God, or uniting with the divine or ultimate reality as embraced by the religious traditions more broadly identified as “Hinduism.” This seminar will first trace the development of the practice of the offering the heart to the divine as described or expressed in the hymns of the Vedas, then in key Upanishads, then in the epics, such as the Ramayana and Mahabharata, especially in the Bhagavad Gita, and then in the Pura?as, especially in the Bhagavata Pura?a. The relationship of bhakti to Vedanta and Yoga and to the various forms of yogic practice will be examined. An exploration of bhakti across Hindu traditions will be conducted, looking at Shiva bhakti, Devi bhakti, and especially Vaishnava or Krishna bhakti traditions where it has thrived and developed into sophisticated theologies of love. Format: lecture and seminar; evaluation: reflection papers and presentations; class: MA, MDiv, MTS, and PhD students welcome. PhD students will be required to do doctoral level research.

HEALING, DEATH & DYING (STLS-4955)

Credits:3

This course will serve as an examination of healing and restoration (spiritual and physical) through the various rituals and practices of the Eastern Orthodox Christian tradition. Students will also study the services and rites associated with death and dying, as well as the theological understanding of life, death and the afterlife. Students will read and study the various services related to the cycles of life. Some Patristic commentaries will also be examined. The course will follow a lecture-discussion format and emphasis is given to class participation. A well-developed paper is required (15-20 pages) in which students reflect on a subject, as agreed on with instructor.

THEOLOGY AND LITURGY IN THE DIGITAL AGE (STLS-5100)

Credits:3

"Theology and Liturgy in the Digital Age" explores the opportunities and challenges created with the incorporation of technology in the 21st century. This course investigates the emerging discipline of Digital Theology, its relation to the digital humanities, and how it both causes and is an effect of current social changes. This course also looks at adaptations to liturgical practices in the digital environment, and the impact on sacramentality, ritual, bodily/virtual presence, and community. Students will engage in both theoretical inquiry and practical application. This is a seminar course, and students are assessed through active participation and a final project. [Coursework in both theology and liturgical studies required; geared toward MA/PhD/final-year-MDiv students; auditors with faculty permission.]

THE ONE CREATOR GOD (STPH-3095)

Credits:3

Classical and contemporary questions regarding the nature of God and creation will be addressed through the retrieval of the tradition of Thomas Aquinas. Existence and attributes of God, divine compassion and human suffering, the possibility and nature of God-talk, divine action and contemporary science, cosmology and creation. Lecture/discussion; paper. (MA/MTS/MDiv/PhD/ThD) (More advanced students may sign up for the course as a special reading course, with requirements adjusted for their level.)

THE HIDDEN GOD (STPH-5000)

Credits:1

The course concerns the issue of the thinkability of God, and the theological meaning of a Hidden God. The course focuses on the interrelation between four theologians: Martin Luther, Karl Barth, Gerhard Ebeling, and Eberhard Jüngel. First, the course outlines Luther’s position on God’s hiddenness in “The Bondage of the Will.” Karl Barth, in his “Church Dogmatic,” attacks Luther’s concept of Deus absconditus as anti-christological. Ebeling counter-criticizes Barth’s reading of Luther, and presents his own interpretation on the topic. Jüngel tries to mediate between Barth and Ebeling. After having analyzed these positions, the course aims to present a different, brand new perspective on the issue of the Hidden God. This course is appropriate to doctoral and advanced Master's students. Class meets daily, 1/14/2019-1/18/2019, from 9:40am to 12:30pm at GTU HEDCO.

CTSC GOD,SUFFERING,PSTRL CARE (STPS-2100)

Credits:3

SUMMER 2016 This is the second course in the Certificate in Trauma and Spiritual Care. If God is good and loves us as a mother and father deeply loves her or his child, then why do we--or those we love--sometimes go through experiences of utter hell? Where is God? We will investigate several Christian responses to the relation between God and human suffering. Class meets daily, 6/20/2016-7/1/2016, from 9:00am-12:30pm at SFTS. FALL 2016 This is the second course in the Certificate in Trauma and Spiritual Care. If God is good and loves us as a mother and father deeply loves her or his child, then why do we--or those we love--sometimes go through experiences of utter hell? Where is God? We will investigate several Christian responses--two classic and three contemporary--to the relation between God and human suffering. Class discussion of the texts, various arguments, and our own positions. Three optional movies. Two drafts of a 5-7 page midterm paper, and a term project (either a 10-12 page final paper, or a semester-long journal). Students may develop their own response to God and suffering in the final project. This course meets at SFTS in San Anselmo for four intensive weekends during the fall semester, on Friday evening from 7-10 PM, and the following Saturday, 9 AM-4:30 PM. The four weekends are as follows: September 9-10, October 7-8; November 4-5; December 2-3. Please visit www.sfts.edu for more information.

GOD,SUFFERING,PSTRL CARE (STPS-4100)

Credits:3

This is the second course in the Certificate in Trauma and Spiritual Care. If God is good and loves us as a mother and father deeply loves her or his child, then why do we--or those we love--sometimes go through experiences of utter hell? Where is God? We will investigate several Christian responses--two classic and three contemporary--to the relation between God and human suffering. Class discussion of the texts, various arguments, and our own positions. Three optional movies. Two drafts of a 5-7 page midterm paper, and a term project (either a 10-12 page final paper, or a semester-long journal). Students may develop their own response to God and suffering in the final project. This course meets at SFTS in San Anselmo for four intensive weekends during the spring semester. Please visit www.sfts.edu for more information.

ADVANCED RDGS IN MISSIOLOGY (STRS-4203)

Credits:3

This seminar for doctoral and upper level students in missiology, is designed to help the students a) become familiar with the classic works in the field and b) work on their own research project as it relates to their comprehensive exams and dissertation, and c) sharpen their skills in seminar presentation and discussion. Depending on the student’s need, there may be a major final research paper at the end, which, for example, could become an STL extended research paper; or possibly the production of a syllabus around an introduction to missiology course. The students will select the readings, prepare and facilitate the sessions, and became familiar with reference works in the area of world mission. [Faculty consent required; 8 max enrollment]

WOMEN'S STUDIES IN RELIGION (STRS-4242)

Credits:3

This seminar (required for students in the GTU Certificate in Women's Studies and open to all interested students) explores and analyzes emerging themes and issues in women's studies in religion, focusing on those that intersect with race, sexuality, gender, ethnicity, class, culture, nationality, and religious expression. This course will provide theoretical groundwork and common vocabulary for students interested in pursuing women's studies and womanist, feminist, mujerista scholarship in theology/religious studies. The course introduces the issues that are raised by the field of women's studies, and explores how these issues relate to the study of religion. Evaluation based on Moodle participation, leadership of class discussion, and final project and presentation. This course is open to all degree programs at the GTU and has an inter-religious orientation. This course is taught from a liberationist pedagogy perspective.

ANIMALS, NATION-STATE & GOD (STRS-4900)

Credits:3

What, if anything, sets human beings apart from other animals? How does this question shape Christian theological ideas in the context of the modern nation-state? What happens to faith and politics when human distinctiveness diminishes? This course considers the significance of theological anthropology (what it means to be human) in relation to other doctrinal topics, ecological urgencies, and the totalizing effects of the modern nation-state. These intersections can, in turn, complicate and enrich standard convictions about human sexuality, gender, and race. Drawing on a variety of tools and methods, we will seek to construct collaboratively a theological approach to "animality" to advance the full thriving and flourishing of God's whole creation. This seminar for advanced master’s level and doctoral students will entail some lecture, group discussion/presentations, and options for a research project suitable for a variety of vocational paths.

THEO/SPIRIT OF PRIESTHOOD (STSP-2600)

Credits:3

This course is designed for candidates preparing for ordination to the Roman Catholic Priesthood. It will examine a contemporary sacramental and ecclesial understanding of presbyteral orders, some reflection upon the biblical foundations for priesthood as they occur in the Old and New Testaments, and some reflection on contemporary religious life in the Catholic Church. Historical, Conciliar and papal documents will also form part of the content of the course. Teaching methods includes lectures, discussions, papers, student presentations, and guest speakers. This course can meet the requirement of the elective praxis course in the JSTB MDiv curriculum. [Faculty consent required; 25 max enrollment]

IN SEARCH OF THE CHURCH (STSP-3035)

Credits:3

Beginning with Scripture, Part 1 examines the Church of the Origins, the rising of the Christian community, and the progressive self-awareness of the community as it organized to respond to the call of the Gospel and the needs of the times. Part 2 surveys the ^quest for ecclesiology^ in the movement from the Reformation and the Council of Trent to the 20th century and what went into creating a ^Vatican II mentality.^ Part 3 highlights Church in the contemporary world: Church as mystery; community sent to announce and celebrate salvation; Church that witnesses and serves; tasks confronting the Church today.

HISPANIC/LATINO THEOLOGY SEM (STSP-4323)

Credits:3

This seminar provides an interactive environment wherein students engage the concepts and praxis of Hispanic or Latino Theology as a contextual theology in the USA. The students will reflect on social location and religious experience, especially as brought into conversation with US Hispanic/Latino Theology, surveying and analyzing its main concepts, roots, core biblical elements and postmodern integrations. This will enable the student to discern the spiritual and intellectual importance of this contextual theology for the wider US Church and society. Aside from weekly readings and discussion preparation, students are responsible for a final research paper and presentation. This class is open to upper level MDiv, MA/MTS, PhD/ThD, STL/STD students or others approved by the instructor. Spanish is helpful but not required. [Faculty consent required; 12 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

TAKING UCB COURSE(S) (UCB-9000)

Credits:12

To use in Web Registration to indicate units to be taken under cross registration at UCB, Holy Names University, and Mills College. To be dropped when the cross registration form(s) is turned in to the Consortial Registrar for a specific course. Course available for 0.5-12 units.

SCL, PLTCL, ETHCL ENVRNMT BUS (UCBA-107)

Credits:3

GENERAL ELECTIVE CREDIT (WAIVER)

Credits:0