Course Information

 

for A. Systematic and Philosophical Theo Department


GENERAL ETHICS (PH-1008)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to the philosophical study of ethics, focusing on key ethical questions (e.g., how we are to live, what we are obliged or permitted to do, etc.) and concepts (virtue, happiness, obligation, the good, and so forth). Through a careful reading of great philosophical works in the western tradition, important ethical theories will be presented within their historical context, including utilitarianism or consequentialism, deontological ethics, virtue theory, and natural law. Class discussion will center on the philosophical merit of these ethical approaches as well as their relevance to contemporary issues. Lecture/discussion format. Student evaluation will be based on class participation, two short written essays, and a final exam. Intended audience: MA, MTS, and MDiv. students.

APPROACHES TO EMBODIMENT (PH-4500)

Credits:3

This course will explore the meaning and significance of the human body for human experience, consciousness, selfhood, and our access to reality. Using the resources of the Thomist tradition, phenomenology, and cognitive science, students will examine a number of key issues: the relationship between the soul and body; our knowledge of other minds; the body's role in perception and cognition; and the bodily basis for intersubjectivity, community, and personal identity. Seminar format. Students will be evaluated based on their class participation and a 15-20 page research paper. [Faculty Consent required; 12 max enrollment]

INDIAN PHILOSOPHY: OVERVIEW (PHBS-4010)

Credits:3

The course provides an overview of Indian (Dharma) thought and philosophical theology, known as the Sarva-darsanas, or Collective of Philosophical Viewpoints, comprising systems of thought from Hinduism, Jainism and (South Asian) Buddhism. The Hindu systems include Carvaka, Vaise?ika, Nyaya, Purva Mima?sa, Sa?kya, Yoga, Upani?adic Vedanta and the Bhagavad Gita. Texts from classical Jaina srama?a (ascetic) and Buddhist Mahayana schools will also be studied. The disciplines covered encompass metaphysics, epistemology, cosmology, ethics, theology, and doctrines specific to Indian philosophy such as the concepts of karma, rebirth, and the full development of human consciousness. Utilizing hermeneutical analyses, the class will examine certain categories central to the classical systems that address the ^big questions^ or the ^ultimate concerns^ in a comparative perspective (intra-, and inter-traditions). Of concern will be the conundrums of existence and non-existence; faith and reason; valid knowledge and doctrinal beliefs; criteria of truth and falsity; self, no-self and the other; theodicy and free-will; morality and ethics; rights and justice; nature and ecology; death and afterlife (or rebirth); soteriology and liberation; and the optimal paths toward these ends. There will be reconstructive readings from Hindu, Jaina and Buddhists texts on the nature and ordering of the universe, moral governance, liberation from suffering, ecology, values and virtues - such as compassion, moral care, non-injury or nonviolence, dharma, and yoga as guiding moral principles. We will examine the aesthetics of grief, anxiety and joy. The course will take an evolving history of ideas approach with an eye to the reasoned thinking that has guided the metaphysical and moral trends in Dharma systems of philosophy and allowed these systems to respond to critiques from within and without. Students will delve deeply into the thinking of leading Dharma intellectuals and theologians in interactive critical dialogue with Western philosophical theories.

JAINA PHILOSOPHY & ETHICS (PHCE-2501)

Credits:3

The course offers an exploration of the philosophy underpinning the ethics, theology, and ecology of the Jaina Dharma tradition. We take an evolving history of ideas approach to the thinking that have guided developments within Jaina worldview - in metaphysics, cosmology, bio-ecology and moral philosophy. The ecological significance (and impact) of Jainism with its reverence for all individual life forms that spread across the elemental, microbial, plant, and animal realms will be studied closely. Students will become familiar with classical and contemporary Jaina texts and teachings, such as of Mahavira, Umasvati, and Raichandra - who was one of Gandhi's teachers even as he evolved his own philosophy of Ahimsa or Nonviolence as part of the larger discourse of 'Truth-force'. The course will explore the harmony and tensions persisting between the historical self-understanding of Jaina moral philosophy and the contemporary disciplinary approaches - discursive, normative and virtue ethics. The course will utilize images, videos, field visits, and contemplative examinations of the understanding of karma and dharma and the multidimensional uses of ahimsa (non-injury) along with the other vows or precepts central to Jaina ethics. We shall also consider whether and to what extent Jainism had any impact on Hindu, Buddhist, Materialist, Abrahamic and latter-day Anglo-European philosophies through to the Civil Rights movement in the US. The assessment will involve class presentations, reflective papers and a final exam or paper. The course is open to MDiv, MA, amd PhD candidates (with additional work).

HINDU PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS (PHCE-4100)

Credits:3

The course offers an exploration of the philosophy underpinning ethics, theology, and ecology of the Hindu tradition. It takes an evolving history of ideas approach with an eye to the reasoned thinking that have guided the metaphysical and moral trends in Hindu thought. Students will delve deeply into texts such as the Vedas, Upanishads, Bhagavad Gita and the thinking of leading Hindu intellectuals and theologians, such as Shankara, Ramanuja and Gandhi. Among the key Hindu concepts to be examined are: the nature of the self, of the ultimate, origins of the universe, laws of natural order, karma and dharma, moral governance and Hindu law, kingdom of ends, care of self and other and of nature, the highest good, aesthetics, life-cycle rites, death and afterlife (or rebirth), and the paths to self-realization. The comparative appraisal will draw on western analogues and contemporary secular critiques, with transformations in the Hindu diaspora.

LEVINAS (PHCE-5410)

Credits:3

This course will explore the major writings of Emmanuel Levinas, with a special focus on the philosophical context of this work and the writings on Jewish texts and themes. Course readings include Levinas's masterworks Totality and Infinity and Otherwise than Being, as well as Radicalizing Levinas, a collection of political writings on Levinas's ethics.

PHILS OF REL:INDIA & THE WEST (PHHR-4100)

Credits:3

The religions of East and West claim different experiences of an Ultimate Reality and with that, different conceptions of the Divine in their theologies. Between them, both claim varying answers to fundamental human questions, such as the problem of evil, sin and suffering, the nature of the human personhood and its destiny or purpose within the larger cosmological picture. Both East and West also employ philosophical concepts to argue for and against the existence and nature of God or the Transcendent, and of the soul, and understand with overlaps and differences the puzzles of divine action in the universe and history (e.g. via miracles, direct intervention, incarnation, and salvific telos), as well as questions of truth, theodicy and atonement. This Seminar will be an in-depth comparative study of these philosophical theologies, with a focus on Judeo-Christian and India's Dharma traditions. Seminar, research paper; intended audience: MA/MTS, PhD/ThD. [15 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

PHIL OF BEING AND NOTHINGNESS (PHHR-4400)

Credits:3

This course will be a limited philosophical examination of Being and Nothingness in Western and Eastern Traditions, with special emphasis on the role of Nothingness (including notions of Nonbeing, Emptiness, Neglect, Not-yet-ness) and its implications for habits of thought and action. The course will follow a seminar format. Grading will be based on 2 in-class presentations (with papers), and a final paper. Intended audience: advanced MA/MDiv, and PhD. [PIN code required; 12 max enrollment]

BUDDHIST SEM ON POSTMODERNITY (PHHR-4582)

Credits:1.5

There is little doubt that philosophy, science and religion are undergoing profound transformations leading some contemporary scholars to seek intercultural understandings. Keeping in mind the intellectual encounters between East and West readings from the phenomenologists, structuralists and the postmoderns as well as a sampling of relevant Buddhist texts. Students are required to write and deliver a 10-15 minute presentation in addition to the final paper.

DHARMA, YOGA, AND TANTRA (PHPT-4500)

Credits:3

Through philosophical reflection, study of sacred texts, and application of spiritual technologies, this course will introduce pathways of spiritual liberation found in dharmic, yogic, and tantric wisdom traditions. Students will investigate the thea/ologies, cosmologies, soteriologies, cultures, and consciousnesses of these diverse traditions. Special analysis will be given to marginalized heterodox traditions of spiritual emancipation--such as the tantric path of the Mahavidyas or Great Wisdoms. Scriptures explored will include the Vedas, Upanishads, Bhagavad Gita, Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, Tantras, and devotional writings of the bhakti poet-saints. Coursework will include embodied ritual, religious exercise, and scriptural study, and spiritual lecture, pilgrimage to temples, group processes, classroom presentations, and scholarly research. Prerequisite readings will be announced. A field trip to at least one ceremony will be required. Please see the syllabus for more information. [20 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

PHILOSOPHICAL AESTHETICS I (PHRA-4321)

Credits:3

Aesthetics has become a major field of philosophical investigation only since the 18th century, particularly since Immanuel Kant's Critique of Judgment. Still, this class will not neglect the earlier classical tradition with its metaphysical framework. Aesthetics explores the important question of value judgments in aesthetics. It also leads philosophy to investigate very concrete phenomena and problems such as the structure of the human mind and the concrete materials of art and music, as well as history and society in so far as they are reflected in art. This class will try to bridge the typical gap between abstract reflection and concrete phenomena in aesthetics. The first semester will focus on the philosophy of beauty in general; the following semester will explore the concrete fields of architecture, painting and music. Seminar. Research paper and class presentations. Intended audience: MDiv, MA/MTS, PhD/ThD.[Auditors excluded]

PASSION OF THE WESTERN MIND (PHST-2500)

Credits:3

This seminar will center around a careful reading of Richard Tarnas' The Passion of the Western Mind, a landmark one-volume narrative intellectual history of the West which stresses the discovery, loss, and recovery of the concept of form, as well as most of his recent Cosmos and Psyche (a scholarly retrieval of elements of the astrological tradition which stresses its archetypal, indicative, and participatory nature). The goals of this course are for you to attain a broad, synthetic understanding of the western intellectual tradition from its origins in ancient Greece to the present, and for you to critically ponder Tarnas' theory of the religious, cultural, philosophical, and archetypal dynamics that have shaped this history. There will also be other, supporting readings, particularly Louis Dupre's Passage to Modernity. [Auditors with faculty permission]

DOES GOD EXIST? (PHST-4811)

Credits:3

More recently a kind of ^evangelical new atheism^ has gained momentum and wishes to present a challenge to all those who believe in God or have religion. In response, the case has been made that this atheism is its own kind of religion. In this seminar, however, we do not want to take on the current polemics (although we will not avoid them either), but rather take it as an occasion to revisit the rational resources that are available to people of faith. We will study arguments for and against the existence of God in their historical development and explore their argumentative force. Class preparations and 15-20 page research paper. [15 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

THIS I BELIEVE! (ST-1225)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to Christian Theology. Christian theology is an engagement with Christian faith in reflection and practice in the complexity of life and the world. It is an exercise of the heart, the soul, the spirit and the mind. In this course we will explore how Christians and churches have wrestled with life and faith in different historical and cultural settings. We will also engage ourselves in the articulation and practice of faith in the contemporary world, the world we have come to know and experience as diversified and pluralistic socio-politically and regio-culturally. Ours is a theological conversation with the Bible, religious traditions, theological concerns in different parts of the world.

INTRO TO SWEDENBORGIAN THGT (ST-1550)

Credits:3

Centering especially in Swedenborg’s two-volume summa, True Christianity (1771), we will explore systematically Swedenborgian theology in an overview fashion. In addition to engaging Swedenborg’s thought in this classic work, we will also situate his ideas and topics in the context of historical Christian theology, and at all times we will consider spirituality interpretations for the practice of ministry in the contemporary moment. Seminar style. Two student presentations; six 2-page papers; final research paper. Intended audience: M.Div., M.T.S. Can be upgraded for M.A., D.Min, and Ph.D. Course scheduling TBD based upon student availability.

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY (ST-2003)

Credits:3

A systematic examination of the classic Christian doctrines in light of the contemporary context and the church's ministry. Required of PLTS MDiv and MTS students. Recommended preparation: basic seminary level courses in Old Testament, New Testament, Church History, and Reformation Theology. Auditors welcome.

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY I (ST-2004)

Credits:3

A systematic examination of the classic Christian doctrines in light of the contemporary context and the church's ministry. Required of second-year PLTS MDiv and PLTS MTS students. First of two course sequence including ST2005.

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY II (ST-2005)

Credits:3

A systematic examination of the classic Christian doctrines in light of the contemporary context and the church's ministry. Continuation of ST2003 or ST2004. This class will be offered both Summer 1996 and Spring 1997. SUMMER: Class meets weekdays, 6/3/96-6/14/96, from 2:00pm to 5:00pm, in Room GH1 at PLTS. SPRING: Class meets Tuesdays and Fridays, from 8:00am to 9:50am, in Room GH1 at PLTS.

ISSUES IN THEOLOGY (ST-2033)

Credits:3

We will explore some main theological issues such as time and eternity, God's activity in the world, life and death of Jesus, work of the Spirit, problems of evil, meaning of life and death, etc., in the socio-politically and religio-culturally diverse world. We will be engaged in theological conversation with the Bible, traditions of the church and the world in which we live today. Format of the course will be lecture and discussion, and evaluation will be based on participation and presentation in the class and the research and reflection term paper.

INTRODUCTION TO THEOLOGY (ST-2180)

Credits:3

This foundational course explores the nature of theology, its methods, its resources, and the criteria for understanding them. It also approaches contemporary understanding of important theological themes: creation, the human person, sin, grace, God, Jesus Christ, church, and eschatology. Special attention given to the distinction between philosophy of God and theology, and to the positioning of theology in the discourses of the study of religion. Major interlocuters include, among others, Aquinas, Lonergan, Rahner, Haight, Gutierrez, and Johnson. This course is intended for MDiv/MA students. Requirements: Three short papers of 3-4 pages, an oral presentation, and a final exam. Intended audience: MDiv and MA.

CHRISTOLOGY AND THE POOR (ST-2349)

Credits:3

This course serves as an introduction to Christology. It does not attempt to survey a number of contemporary christologies, but seeks instead to interpret Jesus Christ from a concern for historical human suffering and the requirement that theology speak to that concern in a manner both faithful to the tradition and relevant to believers today. To accomplish this we will begin with the Biblical witness and examine the development of the classical christological doctrines from the privileged cultural locus of Latin America and the systematic perspective developed by Jon Sobrino. As an introduction to Christology this course is designed for M.Div. students and others in first degree programs (MA, MTS, etc.). It will employ a lecture/discussion format. Evaluations will be through weekly one-page papers, class presentations, and a final 5-7 page paper. Students in advanced degree programs (STL, STD, Ph.D., etc.) can petition to upgrade this course and submit a final research paper of 20 pages along with a prospectus for the research paper. [30 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

SPIRIT IN THE CHURCH (ST-2378)

Credits:3

SPRING 2016 Lecture-seminar format, explores the Christian understanding of the Holy Spirit, the Spirit's action in the world and Church, ritual and liturgy, including the sacraments (especially those of initiation), the goal of God's saving work in history, eschatology. Major Church and ecumenical documents, plus contemporary biblical and theological resources. Informed class discussion, two research papers, first midway through the semester, the second at semester's end. A foundational course in the JST MDiv curriculum. SPRING 2017 Intended to explore the theology of the Holy Spirit at work in the Church, especially through its sacramental ministry, and in the world bringing the Reign of God to completion. The course follows a lecture-seminar format and uses conciliar and ecumenical documents, biblical and theological resources, and contemporary theological authors. Participants are expected to attend class, have read, and be ready to participate in discussion of, the readings designated for each date. In some cases, different groups of students will focus on different readings to establish a discussion in class. Final paper. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

CHRISTOLOGY:ANCIENT & MODERN (ST-2391)

Credits:3

The first sessions of the course will explore the formative developments of Christology in the early centuries of the church, exploring how the Christological diversity of the New Testament is constrained towards the more metaphysical debates leading to Chalcedon (451). We shall then examine the extent to which the definition of Chalcedon truly answers the questions it seeks to settle, and briefly considers the later fate of ^Antiochene^ and ^Alexandrian^ emphases in Scholastic and Protestant Christology, focusing especially on the communication of idioms. We will then turn to the "liberal" Protestant critique of Chalcedonianism and compare it with a variety of modified Chalcedonian positions in the contemporary period, including feminist/ liberationist approaches. The course will conclude with a discussion of black/Asian/Latin American approaches, emphasizing the need to reinterpret the Chalcedonian idiom in different cultural contexts. [25 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

THEOLOGY OF WORK (ST-2416)

Credits:3

We spend most of our lives working. What might it mean to think theologically about the work that we do? How might all work be considered a vocation, or calling? What would it mean to approach work as a theological praxis: as prayer, liturgy or sacrament? This course explores these questions by engaging a range of theological and philosophical texts (from Luther to Marcella Althaus Reid) and by visiting local Bay Area agencies involves in issues of workforce development (like the Stride Center, Kapor Center's "Hack the Hood," and Wages Co-Op).

AS-PAC ISL DIASPORIC POLTCL TH (ST-2453)

Credits:3

ASIAN-PACIFIC ISLANDER DIASPORIC POLITICAL THEOLOGY IN THE CONTEXT OF EMPIRE BUILDING. This course enters the Asian-Pacific Islanders' search for a transformative theo-political discourse through the theology of struggle (a Filipino theology). From this entry point, it pursues, explores, and seeks to articulate the main tenets, practices and shape of APIs political theology through the lens of diasporic, post-colonial, race and ethnic discourse in the context of the global market and US imperial project. This course will include lecture and discussion and be open to GTU students for credit, pastors and lay leaders for CEU and for all community participants to participate in the course as we create a rich and mixed-learning community. This course is being offered as part of the Civil Liberty and Faith project of the PANA Institute. The class meets weekdays, 1/07/08-1/18/08, from 5:00pm-9:00pm in MUDD 103.

INTRO TO WOMANIST THEOLOGY (ST-2479)

Credits:3

This course will introduce students to womanist theology, variant approaches to this theology and its practical applications for daily living. It is designed for second year master's level students to be taken after an initial systematic theology course. A semester in African American history is helpful as the course is multidisciplinary. By the end of the course, students should be able to identify differences between womanist and feminist theologies, define liberationist theology, and provide critical engagement with womanist theological concepts. [Introductory theology]

CHRISTIAN SACRAMENTS (ST-2530)

Credits:3

This is a foundational course in the sacraments of the Christian Church. Attention will be given to the biblical base of sacraments, their historical development, and the post-Vatican II theology/ liturgy of sacraments. The ecumenical aspects of the sacraments will also be a part of this course. Requirements: Assigned reading; three papers 7 pages in length on sacraments; and a final 4 page paper on a broader sacramental theme.

THEOLOGY IN A KOREAN CONTEXT (ST-2539)

Credits:3

THIS CLASS IS BEING OFFERED IN KOREAN. As an instruction to systematic theology, this course examines the meaning, structure, method, and interconnections of the major Christian doctrines with particular attention to biblical foundations, historical development, ecclesial conetxts in Korea (Korean immigrant society) and contemporary significance for Christian life and ministry. Students are expected to acquire how to think theologically through the knowledge of theological vocabulary and methods of constructive theology, how to reflect theologically on various issues and concerns confronting their own distinctive communities, and their own life. The topics of the course include the tasks and methods of systematic theology, the Trinity (the doctrine of God), creation, doctrine of sin and salvation, triune life, and ecclesiology. Students are encouraged to enagage these topics with Korean (Korean immigrant) context.

MODERNISM & POMO: 20TH C THLGY (ST-2541)

Credits:3

This course explores some of the major Christian theologians of the 20th century through close readings of original texts. The course will focus on the shift from ^modern^ to ^post-modern^ theology and issues associated with this shift, such as the nature of religious knowledge (how is it that we know God and what type of God do we claim to be knowing). Theologians read will include Barth, Bultmann, Tillich, Weil, Rahner, Gutierrez, Daly, Cone and Heyward. Course requirements: Class presentations, four short paper and a take-home exam. [20 max enrollment]

AFRICAN & AF.AMER. LIBERATION (ST-2557)

Credits:3

This course studies the theology of liberation from the perspectives of African and African American experiences. It presents and analyzes the origins, the sources, the challenges and fundamental concepts and themes of African and African American liberation theologies. It also discusses major African and African American liberation theologians, comparing them, contrasting them, and evaluating their contributions and their theological relevance. It shows how African and African American liberation theologians promote the connection between the proclamation of Christian faith and the struggle for liberation, calling Christians for a preferential option for the poor and for social justice, and presenting God as a God of the poor and for the poor, a God of the oppressed, a God of liberation, who is against all forms of oppression and imperialism. Sensitive to the ecumenical perspective of liberation theologies, our reading list includes both catholic and protestant liberation theologians from Africa and from America. [20 max enrollment]

CHRISTIAN ESCHATOLOGY (ST-2664)

Credits:3

Christian Eschatology: Theology from the Edges explores the Christian eschatological imagination through a careful engagement with pre-modern and contemporary texts dealing with the theological category of the future. Students will be encouraged to reflect on the ways in which visions of the future inform particular (and often ambiguous) social and political dispositions and sensibilities. Course will include readings from pre-modern sources (Augustine and Joachim of Fiore) and contemporary theological works: J rgen Moltmann, Rubem Alves, Catherine Keller and also a section on contemporary fiction dealing with the post-apocalyptic imagination. Class format: lecture/discussions. Requirements include: class participation, a theological essay, and a final creative project.

GREATEST OF ALL IS LOVE (ST-3090)

Credits:3

Paul the Apostle ends his celebrated chapter on love (1 Corinthians 13) with these words: ^And now faith, hope and love abide, these three; and the greatest of these is love.^ Paul is right, love is the greatest of all these three. At the same time the fact of the matter is that love also creates pain, agony and suffering in us all. This is the paradox of love. In this course we will explore this paradox of love manifested in the cross of Jesus and in realities of life and history. [25 max enrollment; Auditors with permission of Faculty]

ETERNAL LIFE: A NEW VISION (ST-3122)

Credits:1.5

BEYOND RELIGION, BEYOND THEISM, BEYOND HEAVEN AND HELL Do you believe in life after death? As a religious person do you think you have to? How can we approach this subject in a world that has lost the record-keeping God above the sky, the miracle- working deity who once filled in the gaps of human knowledge and the post-Darwinian idea that human life is not just a little lower than the angels, but just a little higher than the apes? John Shelby Spong, best known as a radical thinker, turns his attention to this subject and surprisingly finds a way to affirm the afterlife by going not beyond life but through life, not beyond time but through time, not beyond humanity but through humanity. This course is designed for clergy of all traditions who have to wrestle with these questions professionally with every death they confront, as well as for lay people and skeptics who have dismissed life after death as a pious delusion. Bishop Spong contends that it is a realistic hope. The course will explore the ancient religious claims of life after death and why they have faded so much in the last century that the idea is scarcely mentioned even in religious circles. It will also attempt to open this subject to new possibilities relying on a deep journey into life itself and to make it possible to say yes with integrity to the ancient question of eternal life even in the 21st century. Class meets daily, 7/26/10-7/30/10, from 9:00am- 1:00pm, at PSR. NOTE: For registration, see www.psr.edu/summer.

PROCESS THEOLOGY (ST-3150)

Credits:3

An introduction to process thought. Participants will read much of Alfred North Whitehead's ^Process and Reality^ and subsequently gain basic knowledge of developments in process theologies by Cobb, Keller, Suchocki, Coleman and others, as well as possible ways to use process approaches in many aspects of religious and public life. Course format: Lecture and discussion, creative participation, plus student presentation. In the first half of the term, students will be expected to do close readings of assigned sections of Whitehead's ^Process and Reality,^ with class lectures and discussions about Whitehead's philosophical concepts, and methods of understanding dynamisms of creative process through participating in poetry, music, and the arts. In the second half of the term, students will engage process theologians' writings on God, the Trinity, Jesus, Christ, Self/Community, Theopoetics, and Eschatology in conversation with contemporary interdisciplinary conversations (sciences, the natural world and ecology, feminist/womanist, issues of race and class, economics, G/L/Q theory, literature and visual/musical arts) in which process insights can foster vitality and transform established modes of thought. Format: Lecture and discussion. Evaluation: Regular reflection papers, class participation and presentation, 10 page final paper. [Previous course in theology or conversation with Instructor; 24 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

SPIRIT/S & PNEUMATOLOGY (ST-3530)

Credits:3

This course explores the Christian understanding of the Holy Spirit within a pluralistic global context. Among the major topics covered will be the history of the development of doctrines related to this branch of theology, along with an examination of how these have been imagined, encoded, and deployed across time and place. Other relevant exploratory areas include the felt presence of the Spirit at work in the world and Church as well as the relationship between body and spirit. Finally, in light of contemporary contextual theologies, how do African, Asian, Latin American and feminist theologies of the Spirit engage these questions? How might we make sense of Spirit and spirits in the experience of indigenous Amerindian religious contexts and compare and contrast them to Christian elaborations of divine Spirit as a cosmic, creative, invigorating and animating force? The course will conclude with discussion of Spirit/s in other religious traditions. Some readings will be in Spanish, although Spanish is not required and is being taught by a Ph.D doctoral student in systematic theology in conjunction with a missiologist. This course is taught by PhD student Cecilia Titizano with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Eduardo Fernandez.(Lecture/Seminar format. Papers and Presentation. Open to various levels with an opportunity for upgrading)

SCIENCE/RELGN FOR MNSTRY (ST-3856)

Credits:3

What conceptual and ethical issues do contemporary science and technology raise for Christian theology and ministry? Topics include cosmology, evolutionary biology, and creation; genetics, neuroscience and the human person; ecological theology and environmental ethics. CTNS guest lecturers. Course is designed for M.Div. and D.Min students (others welcome). Lecture/discussion format with brief reading response papers and 15- page research paper required.

THEOLOGY LAB (ST-4006)

Credits:3

This course will be a student-run seminar focusing on specific theological topics chosen during the first day of class. The prerequisite is any GTU Introductory Theology course. The goal of the course is to pursue in more depth themes that were touched upon in ST2160: Introduction To Theology. In the first class session students, guided by the instructor, will determine which theological topics they want to explore, which author's they will read and what course requirements will be. The course will encourage to develop their own theology by engaging with both contemporary and historic figures. Possible topics and authors include the following: theological anthropology, method in theology, God, Jesus/Christ, eschatology, salvation. The first class will be FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2018 at 11:10am. FUTURE MEETING times will be decided on that day. IF you are interested in the course please e-mail the instructor if you cannot make the first day of class.

A COURSE ON GOD (ST-4062)

Credits:3

Were I to teach a course on God, I would begin with a plate of persimmons." Nancy Shaffer, Instructions in Joy Speaking of the source, naming the numinous, responding to the Spirit, tracing the face of mystery.these are the tasks of the thea/ologian and the poet. The "thea/ological quest" engages the heart and the mind, embraces observation and intuition, language and silence, and responds to the cry of human suffering and oppression. In this course we will read some theologians who speak of God; we will explore the place of metaphor and symbol in thea/ology; and reflect on the meaning of experiential encounters with the holy. We will honor the pursuit of intellectual clarity and critical analysis as modes of relating to the divine mystery. We will ask: Does God (whatever we mean by God) exist? This course will not "master divinity" or exhaust the questions. Some attention will be given to the distinctive issues around speaking of God in the context of Unitarian Universalism. [50 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

CONSTRUCTIVE THEOLOGY (ST-4150)

Credits:3

In this capstone course, students will engage in a process of coming to understand themselves as life-long theological readers and writers in service to whatever form their life and ministry may take after seminary. Through encounters with classical and contemporary Christian theological themes, students will have ample opportunity to grapple with and articulate their own constructive theologies in conversation with others. These conversations will be supported and enabled through regular written assignments, class discussion, and prayerful disciplines. The course will culminate with a final essay. This course is taught from a commitment to liberative pedagogy (see bell hooks and Paulo Friere) and is a blend of active learning, discussion, and interactive lecture where students’ voices and journeys are valued. This is a required course for ABSW students nearing the end of their degree program. Students from other GTU schools are most welcome and encouraged to participate in this course.

FEMINIST THEOLOGY (ST-4160)

Credits:3

This course will approach feminist theology from both first and third world contexts. It will follow both systematic and constructive theological approaches and utilize creative literary as well as analytical forms of learning. [30 max enrollment/Sig. on Reg. Card; Auditors with permission of Faculty/Sig. on Reg. Card]

THEOLOGIES OF THE BODY (ST-4163)

Credits:3

The doctrine of the incarnation--the Divine becoming flesh--is at the heart of Christian theology. Although ideas of salvation are deeply connected to embodiment, Christian theologies have often times developed binary and dualistic concepts in which the body has been devalued. In this class we seek to explore this ambiguity and its ramifications as we discuss issue of sexuality and gender, race and ethnicity, as well as concepts of illness and health. We will be drawing on classic theological texts on divine incarnation and human embodiment as well as on texts and artifacts that are prominent in the current debate. Evaluation will be based on class participation, written assignments as well as a final project. [A basic knowledge of theology; Auditors with Faculty permission]

THEO AESTHETICS CROSS & RACE (ST-4211)

Credits:3

This course begins with an analysis of Hans Urs von Balthasar's ^cruciform^ theological aesthetics as exemplified in sections of his Glory of the Lord series, after which students will proceed to a reading of James Cone's cruciform aesthetics in the context of US race relations in The Cross and the Lynching Tree and other selections. The reading materials will be accompanied by the professor's lectures and student-led class discussions. The final part of the course consists in a theological-aesthetical reading of theologies of reconciliation in a South African post-apartheid context and students' seminar presentations on cruciform racial reconciliation in historical or contemporary contexts of their choice. Students will be evaluated on their presentations, some reflective writing, and a final paper of 20-25 pages, which can be either a thought paper or a research paper. For this advanced course, background coursework in any or all of the following areas will be presumed: fundamental theology, theological anthropology, Christology, and Trinitarian theology. The intended audience is students in the MDiv, MA/MTS, STL, or doctoral programs of their various institutions. [30 max enrollment]

THEOLOGY FROM THE MARGINS (ST-4231)

Credits:3

Theology is alive in context. Theology of Liberation and Liberation Theology emerging from the context of suffering and the margins shook the foundations of the Church, society, and the academy. While this trend has been associated with Latin America, similar contextual theologies emerged simultaneously from all over the world especially from the margins in Africa, Asia, Europe and the United States of America. This lecture/seminar course is a systematic and critical study of theologies from the margins. In tracing the major trends the study will enable students to recognize theology's relation to context and praxis and develop their own theological perspective. Attention will be given through the seminars to selected thinkers from each region. Students are encouraged to research new voices from the margins for final paper. Requirements: Reading 50-60 pages per week, one mid-term reflection paper and one research paper of 15 pages.

SCIENCE, THEOLOGY & ETHICS (ST-4364)

Credits:3

An introduction to modern conversations between Christian theology and the natural sciences: actually, an introduction to the field of Theology & Science. Emphasized will be the value of science for theological construction, ethical discernment, and pastoral ministry. Topics will include (1) whether or not science and faith really are at war; (2) physical cosmology and the Christian doctrine of creation; (3) theological implications of extraterrestrial life; (4) the controversy over evolution; (5) the ethical controversy in genetics over cloning and stem cells; (6) environmental and ecological ethics; (7) and ministry to and with scientists within Christian congregations. Special attention will be given to atheist arguments against theism that employ scientific materialism. Prerequisite: basic introduction to theology. No science background required, even though helpful.

TILLICH & PANNENBERG (ST-4366)

Credits:3

This seminar will provide a study in comparative systematic theologies. We will read critically and compare two multi-volume works in Systematic Theology authored by Paul Tillich and Wolfhart Pannenberg. This course will be of special value to doctoral students preparing for the general comprehensive examination in Systematic Theology. Regular class attendance, leadership, term paper.

OUR THEOLOGICAL HOUSE:UU THLGY (ST-4402)

Credits:3

Many progressives do not realize that they even have a theology, much less that there is a systematic theological worldview that is characteristic of the liberal/progressive tradition. This course, developed by Starr King President and Professor of Theology Rebecca Parker, has now resulted in a book, published in early 2010, co-authored with John Buehrens. Using readings from the history of American liberal theology and contemporary progressive sources, those enrolled--ministers, religious educators, lay leaders, and seminarians--will have a chance to deepen their theological competency and creativity, to reflect on the emerging post-modern context, and to engage in online discussion with others exploring a progressive approach to the classic issues of systematic theology, including the nature of God and humanity, the purpose of religious community, issues of salvation, worship, Christology and Spirit). ATTN: This is a Hybrid course - 8 online sessions and 6 residential sessions that low residency students can join via distance technology. [15 max enrollment; PIN code required; Auditors excluded]

THEOLOGY OF HOPE (ST-4441)

Credits:3

This course will survey the origin and development of the ^theology of hope.^ It will begin with the historical-critical rediscovery of biblical eschatology around the turn of the 20th century and the first serious responses to it by dialectical theologians. Then the basic ideas of Jurgen Moltmann and Wolfhart Pannenberg will comprise the subject matter of the class. In the process discussion will focus on the following issues: the biblical and philosophical stimulations to the development of theologies of hope, the eschatological perspective, and their interaction with other contemporary theologians. Each class will consist of lecture, presentation, and discussion. [At least one course in systematic theology] This course is co-taught by PhD student Junghyung Kim, with a Newhall Award.

JESUS & THE REIGN OF GOD (ST-4488)

Credits:3

The heart of Jesus' message is the reign of God. His ministry is inspired and shaped by it. In all he said and did Jesus made it clear what he meant by it. The reign of God, he declared, belongs to women, men and children who suffer pain, oppression and discrimination in society and under religious establishment. He not only preached about it; he also lived it and practiced it. He himself was the reign of God. How he proclaimed the message of God's reign and how he practiced it will be the focus of our theological reflection and exercise in this course. We will also discuss what it means for the ministries of the church in the world today. [25 max enrollment]

GOD:POSTMDRN & ECOFEM APPROACH (ST-4543)

Credits:3

GOD:POSTMODERN AND ECOFEMINIST APPORACHES. This seminar explores ideas of God in contemporary currents of ecofeminist and postmodern theologies. Special attention will be given to constructive depictions of the relationship between God and creation in light of the ecological and humanitarian crises of our times. Evaluation based on presentations and a final research paper. [Introduction to theology; 15 max enrollment; Auditors with permission of Faculty]

THEOLOGICAL SYMPOSIUM (V) (ST-4632)

Credits:3

This course will offer students an opportunity to experience a non-traditional method of learning by engaging in the art of genuine conversation. In a small seminar, we will engage the various disciplines and research areas of the participants in an exchange of thoughts and ideas. Discussion will be centered around a series of topics negotiated by the class. Our goal will be not only to improve our academic skills together but also to relate them to the practical issues facing the church today. Evaluation will be based on active participation in the class and the research-reflection term paper.

ESCHATOLOGY & XIAN PRACTICE (ST-4665)

Credits:3

LOVE, SEX & MARRIAGE (ST-4694)

Credits:3

Swedenborg's book Conjugial Love [sic] deals extensively with love, sex, and marriage from his unique theological perspective. We will do a close reading of this book with a view to (1) understanding it implications for individual life and the vocation of ministry; (2) appreciating them in the context of teachings on sexuality in both Eastern and Western traditions, with special attention to Tantrism and Jewish esotericism, and (3) bringing Swedenborg into a discussion with contemporary theologies of sexuality, including feminism and queer theory. Ten 1-2 page discussion papers. Final paper or exam.

NAT SCIENCES:INTERRELIGIOUS (ST-5931)

Credits:3

This is a new doctoral seminar in the department of theology and ethics and focused on the departmental concentration in theology and science. This seminar expands the conversations that have been primarily in Christian theology and the natural sciences to the fuller context of multi-religious perspectives drawing on Hinduism and Buddhism. The scientific topics include Big Bang cosmology, evolutionary biology, the environment / ecology / climate change/sustainability, and medicine / bioethics. We will read a variety of religious scholars as well as the biographical writings of internationally-renown scientists of committed religious faith published through the CTNS program "Science and the Spiritual Quest." [Auditors with faculty permission]

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY I ONLINE (ST-8108)

Credits:3

This online course covers the first half of an introduction to Christian theology. Beginning with the meaning of religious faith, we move into the method question of the relation between divine revelation and the authority of scripture, human reason and experience. From there, we investigate the meaning of God using ancient and contemporary Trinitarian theology; Reformed theologian John Calvin, feminist theologian Elizabeth Johnson, and Latin American theologian Gustavo Gutierrez. We conclude with differing understandings of creation, and God's relationship to human suffering. Three exams (with option of substituting papers for exams). This course can be followed with Systematic Theology II Online, which finishes the second half of introducing Christian theology. [Auditors with faculty permission]

INTRO TO SWEDENBORGIAN THGT (ST-8130)

Credits:3

Through a broad and in some areas intensive study of Swedenborg's theological and philosophical writings, we will come to an understanding of fundamental principles and insights comprising Swedenborgian thought. A brisk survey of approximately forty theological topics will be covered. Swedenborg's symbolic approach to biblical hermeneutics will be emphasized. Special focus will center on Swedenborg's integration of his scientific philosophic framework into his metaphysical cosmology. We will also study Swedenborg's biography. At all times, there will be an interest in interpretations useful for contemporary ministry. Required for SHS first year MDiv students. This course is the on-line version of ST 1550, Introduction to Swedenborgian Thought. Only students taking the course as an online course should register using this course number; all others should register for ST 1550. This course meets at posted course meeting times using Adobe Connect, and you must be available in your corresponding time zone to participate in class. A webcam, high speed internet connection, and the latest version of Flash is required.

FOUNDATIONS OF THEOLOGY (ST-8214)

Credits:3

This is an online section of a hybrid course that examines the nature and function of theology through a systematic inquiry into the dynamics of faith and revelation, the role of scripture and tradition, the use of religious language and symbols, the genesis of doctrine, the operation of theological method, and the relationship of theology to praxis. The course introduces basic theological concepts and terms, exposes students to a range of major theologians and theological styles, and situates the study of theology in the life and ministry of the Church. For these reasons, the course can serve as an introduction to the study of theology. It is designed for MDiv students and others in first degree programs (MA, MTS, etc.). The course uses a lecture/discussion format in a flipped classroom for on-site students. Online students will form their own small reflection groups in structured discussion threads. Evaluations will be based on participation in these threads, several short papers, and a final exam. [10 max enrollment]

INTRODUCTION TO THEOLOGY (ST-8260)

Credits:3

HYBRID IN-PERSON/ONLINE FORMAT. This course emphasizes liberatory and contemporary thought, through brief but in-depth encounters with historically pivotal or influential essays, texts, thinkers, and ideas. Students will learn to use and interpret basic theological concepts and models, using traditional vocabularies (doctrine of God, creation, theological anthropology, Christology, suffering and evil, soteriology, pneumatology, eschatology) by engaging a variety of theological texts critically and creatively. Students will be invited to participate as theologians while gaining a sense of how theology is a temporal, contextual, ongoing and imaginative endeavor, in which present articulations are flooded with, produced by, argue with, extend, contradict, and depart from inherited claims about the relations between God, Jesus/Christ, the Holy Spirit, humanity, life, and the universe(s). NOTE: The 1st week of class, July 7-11, will be held on campus, 9:00am-1:00pm, in MUDD 103. On-campus participation is strongly encouraged for the 1st week, but alternate distance learning arrangements can be made by contacting Dr. Johnson by June 23. The 2nd-5th weeks of the course, July 14-August 8, will meet asynchronously ONLINE using Moodle. There are no required meeting times. High-speed internet connection required. See http://moodle.gtu.edu/mod/resource/view.php?id=227 17 for full technology requirements. Contact Dr. Johnson with questions about course format. [PIN code required; 30 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

U U THEOLOGY (ST-8319)

Credits:3

This reading-intensive online course grounds its exploration in the fundamentals of liberal theology, through a survey of Unitarian, Universalist, and Unitarian Universalist voices. Its main purpose is to engage those considering Unitarian Universalist ministry in the practice of theological reflection while exploring some of the historical, philosophical, and theological contexts shaping Unitarian Universalism as we know it today. This course is intended to provide a deep engagement with modern Unitarian Universalist theologies and is not intended to replace a class in systematic theology. Students will be expected to complete the reading, write a brief weekly reading response, and participate in dialogue about personal and spiritual responses to the topics each week. Students may choose to skip submitting reading responses for two of the weeks during the semester. All students are required to submit a final paper on their own personal theology during the final week of the course. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

UNITARIAN UNIVERSAL THEOLOGY (ST-8401)

Credits:3

Unitarian Universalist Theologies: This reading-intensive online course grounds its exploration in the fundamentals of liberal theology, through a survey of Unitarian Universalist voices. Its main purpose is to engage those considering UU ministry in the practice of theological reflection while exploring some of the historical, philosophical, and theological contexts shaping Unitarian Universalism as we know it today. This course is intended to provide a deep engagement with modern Unitarian Universalist theologies and is not intended to replace a class in systematic theology. Students will be expected to complete the reading, write a brief weekly reading response, and participate in dialogue about personal and spiritual responses to the topics each week. Students may choose to skip submitting reading responses for two of the weeks during the semester. All students are required to submit a final paper on their own personal theology during the final week of the course. [Faculty Consent required; 20 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

SPECIAL TOPICS (ST-9300)

Credits:3

MEET GOD @ FOOT OF CROSS Jürgen Moltmann has written that "when the crucified Jesus is called the 'image of the invisible God,' the meaning is that this is God and God is like this." In this seminar, we take Moltmann's Christological claims as our starting point and then engage theologians who have sought to extend Moltmann's insights by considering how the nature of God is revealed not only in the person of Jesus on the cross; but also in those who stand at the foot of the cross in every age-the poor, the "invisible", the marginalized, and the oppressed. Special attention will be paid to feminist, womanist, African American and Latin American liberation theologians who believe that we meet God both in the crucified Jesus AND in the crucified peoples present in our own contexts. Seminar format with shared leadership in discussions and three 7-10 page reflections. Prerequisite: successful completion of a graduate level introduction to theology course. [30 max enrollment]

INTRO TO THEOLOGICAL ETHICS (STCE-2474)

Credits:3

This course examines the ways that Christian moral ideals and decisions are shaped in conversation with the authoritative sources of Christian faith (Scripture and tradition), and changing social environments (ideational, cultural, and material). For this goal, on the one hand, this course will survey dynamics between being and acting, Christian faith and culture, and moral responsibility and human limitation. On the one hand, this course try helping students to develop the art of moral and spiritual discernment an decision-making in their personal, congregational, and public lives in a faithful and justifiable way. NOTE: This course will be taught in Korean.

LIBERATION THEOLOGIES (STCE-2531)

Credits:3

Liberation theology has been one of the most influential theological movements in contemporary Christian theology. This course surveys some of its main tenets, texts, and practices. We pay particular attention to the development of liberation theologies in light of the experience of oppressed communities (along the lines of class, race, gender, ethnicity) and how these experiences shape their theological imagination. In addition to covering some of the pillar texts in the tradition, the course will cover several developments in liberating theologies: womanism, mujerista theology, queer theology, postcolonial theologies, and ecofeminism. Class format: lecture/class discussion. Requirements will include: class participation: weekly reflections, book review, and final research project.

THLGY,ECONOMY,SUSTAINABILITY (STCE-2776)

Credits:3

THEOLOGY, ECONOMY, AND SUSTAINABILITY: BEYOND CREDIT CRISES TO FAITHFUL INVESTMENTS In this course, we will examine the intersections between theology, economy, and sustainability. Creation can be conceptualized as a divine economy with complex interactions where 'oikos' refers to relations both in economy and ecology. In fact, we will be unable to live more sustainably on this planet without finding ways to bring the 'households' of economy and ecology into greater cohesion. We will explore biblical and historical resources, theological and interreligious resources for the construction and implementation of sustainable theologies and practices. Format: Lecture and discussion. Evaluation: research papers and projects, depending on student interest and preference. Intended Audience: All levels. [25 max enrollment; Auditors with Faculty permission]

QUEER RLGS LDRSHP SEXUAL ETHCS (STCE-3283)

Credits:1.5

This course we will facilitate shared investigation of theological ethics in light of ^queer theory^ and emerging forms of ^queer^ religious leadership, mostly in Christian traditions and contexts. We will divide the semester into three parts: 1)an analysis of ^queer sexual culture^ in contemporary society; 2)what a queering of God (theology) entails in relation to sexual ethics; and 3)how the first two parts shape ^queer religious leadership^ with respect to theological education and ritual formation. Rather than aiming toward a well-defined ethical ^system,^ we will attempt to collect and gather theological/ethical resources and tools for shaping religious leadership in the context of diverse sexual intimacies, varied familial patterns, and institutional religious power. Lectures, discussions, presentations, critical reflection papers, and a final project. STFT 3287 (QUEER/CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY) highly recommended. [Intro courses in theology and ethics; PIN code required]

TRANSFORMING CHRISTIAN LDRSHP (STCE-3289)

Credits:3

This course facilitates theological exploration of Christian leadership and sexual ethics. We will divide the semester into three parts: 1) an analysis of ^queer sexual culture^ in contemporary U.S. society and its varied influences on the wider culture; 2) the significance of critical social theory (especially in relation to sexuality and gender) for a theologically constructive approach to sexual ethics; and 3) the implications of the first two parts in transforming Christian leadership (both lay and ordained) with respect to theological education and ritual formation. Rather than aiming toward a cohesive ethical system, we will attempt to collect and develop theological/ethical resources and tools for shaping religious leadership in the context of diverse sexual intimacies, varied familial patterns, and institutional religious power. (This course was previously taught with the title ^Queer Religious Leadership and Sexual Ethics.^) Lectures, discussion, presentations, critical reflection papers, and a final project. Intended audience: CSR. Recommended preparation: ^Transforming Christian Theology^ [Intro in theology and ethics; PIN code required] NOTE: This course is the in-class version of STCE 8252. Students wishing to take the online version of this class should register for STCE 8252.

BONHOEFFER: FOLLOWING JESUS (STCE-4343)

Credits:1.5

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, both a pastor and a theologian, was deeply involved in the church struggle in Nazi Germany. He sought to discern what it means to follow Jesus in the modern world, especially in a tyrannical state. His book ^Discipleship^ (formerly ^The Cost of Discipleship^) reflects growing pacifist convictions in Bonhoeffer. However, for Bonhoeffer the path of discipleship eventually led to his involvement in the conspiracy to assassinate Adolf Hitler and finally to his death at the hands of the Nazis in 1945. We will explore his striking distinction between cheap grace and costly grace, his interpretation of the Sermon on the Mount, and the question of his martyrdom. Our study of Bonhoeffer's concept of discipleship will be a catalyst for reflection on what it means for us to follow Jesus in our time and place. [20 max enrollment; Auditors with permission of Faculty] Class meets daily, 1/07/08-1/11/08, from 8:30am- 12:30pm in PLTS GH1.

ASTROTHEOLOGY & ASTROETHICS (STCE-6005)

Credits:3

This seminar will frame theological and ethical exploration within a scientific review of physical cosmology, the expanding universe, the search by astrobiologists for microbial life. within our solar system, and the search by SETI Institute for intelligent life elsewhere in the Milky Way. Astrotheology will be defined as that branch of theology which provides a critical analysis of the contemporary space sciences combined with an explication of classic doctrines such as creation and Christology for the purpose of constructing a comprehensive and meaningful understanding of our human situation within an astonishingly immense cosmos. Astroethics will be defined as that branch of ethics which formulates issues regarding space exploration, the treatment of off-Earth biospheres, planetary protection, satellite surveillance, weaponization of space, and plans for welcoming extraterrestrial intelligent life into a common future. Field trips to NASA and SETI may be planned.

TRANSFORMING CHRISTIAN LDRSHP (STCE-8252)

Credits:3

This course facilitates theological exploration of Christian leadership and sexual ethics. We will divide the semester into three parts: 1) an analysis of ^queer sexual culture^ in contemporary U.S. society and its varied influences on the wider culture; 2) the significance of critical social theory (especially in relation to sexuality and gender) for a theologically constructive approach to sexual ethics; and 3) the implications of the first two parts in transforming Christian leadership (both lay and ordained) with respect to theological education and ritual formation. Rather than aiming toward a cohesive ethical system, we will attempt to collect and develop theological/ethical resources and tools for shaping religious leadership in the context of diverse sexual intimacies, varied familial patterns, and institutional religious power. (This course was previously taught with the title ^Queer Religious Leadership and Sexual Ethics.^) Lectures, discussion, presentations, critical reflection papers, and a final project. Recommended preparation: ^Transforming Christian Theology^[Intro in theology and ethics] NOTE: This course is the ONLINE version of STCE 3289. Only students taking the course as an online course should register using this course number; all others should register for STCE 3289. This course meets at posted course meeting times using Adobe Connect, and you must be available in your corresponding time zone to participate in class. A webcam, high speed internet connection, and the latest version of Flash is required.

XTIAN MISSION NEW PERSPECTIVE (STFT-2458)

Credits:3

The world has always been pluralistic. This must have been part of God's design for creation. The Christian church has at last awakened to this pluralistic reality of God's creation. Since Christian mission must be the heart of what the church must be, there is urgent need to reconstruct theology and praxis of Christian mission informed and shaped by God's creating and saving activity in the world of pluralism. This course will seek to develop fresh understanding of Christian mission vis-a-vis our world today. [Introduction to Theology;max enrollment 15]

QUEER/CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY (STFT-3287)

Credits:3

Working at the intersection of sexuality and religion--where Christianity itself appears as a ^queer thing^--this course will consider the theological potential of queer theory and the queer insights of Christian theology. As we examine traditional Christian doctrinal topics (such as God, Christ, Trinity, salvation, and so on), we will seek to discern the contributions of queer gender/sex perspectives to the ongoing development of Christian faith and practice. Lecture/discussion; critical reflection papers and one research project. [Intro courses in theology and church history]

TRANSFORMING CHRISTIAN THLGY (STFT-3288)

Credits:3

This course explores the intersections of constructive theology and critical social theory (especially ^queer theorizing^ around sexuality and gender, but also concerning race, ethnicity, and class). By retrieving key historical insights from the development of traditional Christian doctrinal topics (such as God, Christ, Trinity, salvation, and so on), we will build strategies for transforming Christian theology in light of contemporary challenges and opportunities in Christian witness and ministry. (This course was previously taught with the title ^Queer/Christian Theology.^) Lecture and discussion; critical reflection papers and research project. This course is the in-class version of STFT 8251 "Transforming Christian Theology". Students wishing to take the online version of this class should register for STFT 8251.

TRANSFORMING CHRISTIAN THLGY (STFT-8251)

Credits:3

This course explores the intersections of constructive theology and critical social theory (especially ^queer theorizing^ around sexuality and gender, but also concerning race, ethnicity, and class). By retrieving key historical insights from the development of traditional Christian doctrinal topics (such as God, Christ, Trinity, salvation, and so on), we will build strategies for transforming Christian theology in light of contemporary challenges and opportunities in Christian witness and ministry. (This course was previously taught with the title ^Queer/Christian Theology.^) Lecture and discussion; critical reflection papers and research project. NOTE: This course is the ONLINE version of STFT 3288 "Transforming Christian Theology". Only students taking the course as an online course should register using this course number; all others should register for STFT 3288. This online course meets asynchronously using Moodle. It has no required meeting times. High-speed internet connection required.

CONTEXTUALIZING THEO & SCIEN (STHR-2280)

Credits:3

CONTEXTUALIZING THEOLOGY AND SCIENCE FOR MINISTRY: PASTORAL AND PEDAGOGICAL PERSPECTIVES What does science add to ministry? Can an awareness of the findings and theories of evolutionary biology, neuroscience, and physics enrich youth ministry, preaching, teaching, and pastoral counseling? Looking at both historical and contemporary issues, this course will explore how interpretations of scientific and theological understandings of reality relate to key questions concerning God, the origins of the universe, the evolution of life, the nature of human beings, the problem of suffering, the question of life after death, and the ultimate fate of the cosmos and the self. It will also explore the vocational application of such research within the context of Christian ministry.

INTRO XTN THLGY & HISTORY I (STHS-1060)

Credits:3

This is the first part of a two-semester course. The goal of this course is to help students become knowledgeable with the current state of Christian theology and the history of Christianity disciplines in interdisciplinary and mutual interaction. By the end of the two-semester course, students will come to know the interdisciplinary nature of these two disciplines through critical engagement with each of the disciplines. The first semester (fall) course is a prerequisite for enrollment in the second (spring) semester. This course fulfills a PSR 2nd year MDiv requirement.

ECOFEMINIST THEOLOGY (STHS-2670)

Credits:3

Studies the interconnection of theological topics, gender and ecology in Christianity and other religious traditions, panel discussions, field project and research paper [25 max enrollment]

GRACE AND FREEDOM (STHS-4309)

Credits:3

This seminar will consist of a systematic and historical treatment of the dialectic between divine grace and human freedom in relationship to questions such as predestination. Reading will focus on arguments in primary sources such as: Irenaeus, Origen, Augustine, Pelagius, Thomas Aquinas, Luther, Erasmus, Arminius, Edwards, Barth, and Rahner. Contemporary arguments regarding genetic determinism and human freedom will be reviewed. Lectures, class discussion, papers. [1 course in systematic or historical theology; Auditors with permission of Faculty] This course is co-taught by PhD student Sheila Taylor with a Newhall Award.

LITURGICAL THEOLOGY (STLS-2105)

Credits:3

This course is designed as a theological introduction to the actions, symbols, texts, and contexts which make up the breadth and depth of Christian liturgy. Particular attention is given to reflection on the Church's worship as the arena of encounter with the Paschal Mystery of Christ and as a communal participation in the Trinitarian life. It is intended for MDiv and other Masters level students, with Roman Catholic liturgy as its particular focus. Classes will be divided into lectures and class discussions on assigned readings and related pastoral questions. Class participation and three writing assignments that demonstrate the ability to understand and adapt the pastoral and theological issues will be the basis for evaluation. [27 max enrollment]

JESUS: ZEALOT,MYSTIC,MESSIAH? (STNT-4100)

Credits:3

In relation to the world's religions, the special feature of Christianity is Jesus himself. But who was Jesus? Was he a wandering sage expressing the deep wisdom of God? Was he a social revolutionary, acting against the Romans and Jewish elite? Was he the Messiah of God, the one whom many of the Jews expected? Using current historical Jesus research, this course investigates who Jesus was. The first part of the course looks at a Jesus who did not see himself as a messianic figure. Jesus was a mystic in touch with the divine sphere of reality, a figure who knew the wisdom known by all great religious leaders. He taught that God's kingdom was already here, for those who had eyes to see it. In contrast, the authors of the opposing view see Jesus as a messianic prophet who believed that God was about to bring in the New Creation, through his actions. Students will look at differing views of Jesus by the best historical Jesus scholars, compare them, and develop their own view of who Jesus was. This seminar involves discussion, two papers; open to students from MDiv to PhD levels. This course fulfills the MDiv Capstone requirement. First meeting 2/5/16 from 6:30-9:30 at SFTS.

THEOLOGY OF HEBREW SCRIPTURES (STOT-2070)

Credits:3

The First Testament (also known as the Hebrew scriptures and the Old Testament) is a fascinating collection of writings with a complex historical development, containing many passages that raise difficult questions. How it fits together as a whole is an exciting area of modern scholarship. In this seminar we will look, first, at some of the classic treatments of Old Testament Theology which focus on the unity of the Hebrew Scriptures. Then we will utilize a new approach that combines an awareness of the ancient arrangement of the Hebrew Scriptures with a literary reading, with special attention to texts which function as creedal. This approach includes historical, literary, and canonical considerations and will be of interest to students with different levels of familiarity with and interest in the various areas of biblical scholarship. [15 max enrollment; Auditors excluded]

GOD AND SUFFERING (STPH-2209)

Credits:3

An examination of classical and contemporary approaches to the problem of God and human suffering, including scriptural, theological, philosophical and literary sources. Lecture/ discussion. Weekly one-page reflection papers and final 10-15 page reflection paper. [MA/MTS,MDiv]

POLITICAL THEOLOGY (STPH-4880)

Credits:3

The recent resurgence of the language of religion in the public sphere calls for a re-examination of the relationship between theology and political theory. What are the connections between ideas of God and power, especially in an age of secularism? Is the theological always political? And, can the political ever be considered a-religious? If "modern theories of the state are secularized theological concepts" (Schmitt) how can one rethink and critique either state or theology? This course explores the idea of political theology by engaging a wide range of texts, including Paul's letter to the Romans, Jacob Taubes, Augustine, Spinoza, Simone Weil, Hannah Arendt, and Vincent Lloyd. NOTE: This course is the in-class version of STPH 8480 Political Theology. Students wishing to take the online version of this class should register for STPH 8480. [Introductory Theology course; 15 max enrollment]

SIMONE WEIL'S POLITICAL THLGY (STPH-4980)

Credits:3

Simone Weil's writings are characterized by a unique attentiveness to the relationship between politics, economics and religion. This course will explore the development of Weil's political theology from her early writings in ^Oppression and Liberty^ to her later proposals in ^The Need for Roots^ (written for the French Resistance). The course will be oriented around Weil's idea of decreation and its connection to the history of negative theology. Themes to be discussed include: 1)the contributions of Plato and Marx to Weil's thinking; 2)the nature of institutions and the structure of oppression; 3)the relationship of theory and praxis; 4)Weil's unique form of Christianity; and 5)her philosophy of work. [20 max enrollment; PIN code required]

THE CHANGE TOWARD WHOLENESS (STPS-4101)

Credits:3

Both the New Testament and psychology speak of a person's change from brokenness toward wholeness. But how does that change happen? Do we just "set our mind to it, and make the changes"? Or is it more difficult . . . and if so, why? Further, what is God's role in creating this change in us, and what is our role? This course looks at how we change, comparing and contrasting the views from neuro-biology, psychology, and spirituality. We begin with how change is possible in our interrelationships, and what are the impediments to change. We then look at the question of the will: Do we have the willpower to change, or is that capacity overwhelmed by other forces? From here, we look at classic Christian spirituality, which says it is only God who can change us toward wholeness. We conclude by looking at the most recent psychological evidence for how change is possible-and more importantly, for how changes can be made to last. Class discussion of weekly readings; midterm and final papers. [Auditors with faculty permission]

THLGY, PERSON & NEUROSCIENCE (STPS-5950)

Credits:3

This advanced MA/PhD seminar focuses on our growing understanding of the relationship between theological anthropology, cognitive science, and neuroscience. It provides the student a background in brain science; a mediating framework based on cognitive science to explore the connections between theology and neuroscience; and opportunities to participate in new scholarship in the relation between theology and neuroscience. Topics examined in the course may include cognitive, affective, and social neuroscience; religious experience, theological anthropology, neuroethics, and imago Dei; narrative and contemplative psychology; philosophy of mind and pragmatism; artificial intelligence and systems modeling; concepts and metaphor in language; and consciousness and emergence.

BEAUTY/CRITIQUE:CREATIVE THLGY (STRA-2084)

Credits:3

CREATIVE THEOLOGIES IN THE MAKING. Using secular as well as religious sources for theological reflection, students will address the following questions with complexity and in a variety of genres: How do we make fresh theological claims in a world of diversity and constant change? How do we responsibly articulate the possibilities integral to movements toward racial, gender, queer, ecological and economic justices? How might beauty and critique work together to face loss and temporally extend the future(s) about which we care? What kinds of new theological approaches may be needed to sustain religious experiences of depth and vitality? As thinkers and feelers shaped in part by Christian traditions, can we imaginatively engage the world's vulnerabilities and possibilities, personal and institutional, bodily and, perhaps, divine? Texts: John Dewey's A Common Faith, Judith Butler's Precarious Life, Howard Thurman's Meditations of the Heart, Alfred North Whitehead's Adventures of Ideas, Czeslaw Milosz' Book of Luminous Things, and Elaine Scarry's On Beauty and Being Just. Format: seminar/discussion. Grading: reflection papers, class participation and presentation, constructive final paper. Spring 2015: [15 max enrollment] Spring 2016: [Previous course in theology or conversation with Instructor; 12 max enrollment]

PERSPECTIVE ON STORY THEOLOGY (STRA-2445)

Credits:3

The most common and enduring form of human communication is stories. Storytelling is both a natural and an intentional part of human persons as historical beings. There must be a theological power the links biblical stories and other stories. This course will explore this power in human communities and families across cultures, and theological meanings of stories. [15 max enrollment/signature on reg card;auditors with permission of instructor]

THE BYZANTINE VIRGIN MARY (STRA-4645)

Credits:3

In this class we will study how Virgin Mary was represented in Byzantine theological text and visual representations. The students will be graded on their participation in class discussion, on an illustrated power point presentation, and a final paper.

THEO & VIS ARTS IN ORTHODX CH (STRA-4647)

Credits:3

THEOLOGY AND VISUAL ARTS IN ORTHODOX CHURCHES This course will explore the intersection between theology and the visual arts in the Orthodox Church. Students will learn the history of the various visual arts in the Orthodox Christian Church (e.g., icons, mosaics, frescos, vestments, sculptures) from their pre-Christian roots through the theological formative period of Iconoclasm into modern times. Not only were the visual arts formed by theological ideas and controversies, they played (and continue to play) a major role in communicating the Orthodox Christian faith and forming believers in a particular spiritual tradition. Students will explore this relationship by integrating History, Theology, Visual Arts, Liturgy, and Spirituality. The course will be a combination of lecture and discussion with many visual examples. Students will be evaluated on the basis of (1) participation in class discussions, (2) 3 written assignments of 5-10 pages each, and (3) an in-class presentation.

THEOLOGY OF RELIGIONS (STRS-2055)

Credits:3

A Christian-based but interreligiously open exploration of how and whether the many religions may find a place in one's theology. After an introduction, two substantial theologies will be explored, as well as a comparative theological essay bearing upon like questions. Much Hindu as well as Christian content, with some Buddhism as well. Lecture and discussion based on assigned readings. Critique/reflection papers. Fulfills JSTB MDiv interreligious dialogue requirement.

CHRIST AND CULTURE (STRS-2384)

Credits:3

How do we think and engage theologically with the ^world^? What can Christian theology offer to the complexities of today's ^public square,^ which is increasingly multi-cultural and multi-religious? What does theologically informed spiritual formation look like for social transformation? This course invites active engagement with both texts and communities as we analyze the development and multiplicity of approaches to Christology. We will explore what Christ has to do with culture as we work toward constructing a Christian theology of social change and transformation. The class will meet on seven Saturdays over the course of the semester: from 9am to 3:30pm on 9/9, 9/23, 10/7, 10/21, 11/4, and 11/11; and from 9:00am to 12noon on 12/9. This course is also offered entirely online as STRS-8284.

GOD AND THE ECONOMY (STRS-2385)

Credits:3

In the context of increasing economic inequality within the United States, understanding the over arching political and economic systems shaping our lives is essential to cultivating an informed voice for spiritual leaders interested in social change. This course focuses on developing an understanding of the significant social and economic problems confronting America today. In addition, it offers students the opportunity to develop a Christian theological framework for engaging these issues in congregations and other contexts. The 1.5 credit course is co-led by Dr. Erik Olin Wright, Professor of Sociology at University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Dr. Inese Radzins, Professor of Theology at the Pacific School of Religion. We will meet twice a month to discuss readings and lectures based on Dr. Wright's book, ^American Society: How it Really Works,^ and a selection of theological articles, as well as some films. The final project for the course will involve creating a resource or ^tool box^ that others working on these issues can access (through the website for the Center for Spiritual and Social Transformation). We hope the course will generate exciting discussion on some of the most pressing social issues our communities are facing. This course meets at designated course meeting times either in person or online, and you must be available in your corresponding time zone to participate in class. A telephone, webcam, high speed internet connection, and the latest version of Flash are required for online participants. Interested students should contact Naomi Schulz (nschulz@ses.psr.edu) or Leslie Leasure (lleasure@psr.edu) for more details. Meeting times: First class meets on 2/5/2015 from 11:30am-1pm at Holbrook 134. Subsequent classes will meet on 2/18/15, 3/11/15, 4/8/15, 4/22/15, 5/6/15, 5/13/15 from 11:30am-1:00pm at Holbrook 134.

EROTIC CHRISTIANITY (STRS-2560)

Credits:3

If ^God is love^ is God also ^eros^? How does erotic desire inform and shape Christian meanings of love? Do contemporary notions of eroticism make a difference in reading biblical texts and historical Christian traditions? What difference would these questions make in Christian witness to the Gospel today? This course will consider the various cultural and historical meanings of the erotic in the development of Christian theological traditions. We will examine and test the hypothesis that ^eros^ marks a fundamental desire for ^communion^ and the implications of this approach for Christian ministry, liturgical practice, and societal transformation. Lecture and seminar-style discussion; introductory course in theology recommended; ^upgrades^ available for DMin and PhD students; offered both online and live.

TRANSFORMING CHRSTN COMMUNITY (STRS-2561)

Credits:3

How can Christian witness shape communities of social change? How are ostensibly secular movements of social change reshaping the mission and dynamics of Christian congregations? Where do these questions intersect with emerging forms of theological ethics concerning sexuality, gender, and family? This course invites exploration of these topics through the lens of historical Christian traditions and critical social theory (especially forms of ^queer theorizing^). An analysis of diverse sexual intimacies and varied familial patterns will suggest more broadly the challenges and opportunities for nurturing theologically rooted and ritually formed Christian communities of social transformation. Lectures, discussion, presentations, and final project. This course is the in-class version of STRS 8253 Transforming Christian Community. Students wishing to take the online version of this class should register for STRS 8253.

BEING HUMAN: RACE CULTURE RLGN (STRS-2568)

Credits:3

BEING HUMAN: RACE, CULTURE, AND RELIGION This course, ^Being Human^, will explore the question: What does it mean to be human from a Christian perspective? We will cover the key issues and what is at stake. We will also bring into the question other disciplines and examine the meaning of a Christian theological anthropology for today. The class welcomes all who are interested in this key question. Whatever your personal views, beliefs, or thoughts, to ^be human^ is a central concern for individual cultivation and communal well-being. The class is open to a diversity of positions. Come join us in the conversation. We invite you to develop your own theological voice - your traditions, experiences, and hopes for the local community and for the world. Class meets weekdays, 7/29/13-8/9/13, from 1:30pm-5:30pm, at PSR.

RELIGION AND PEACEBUILDING (STRS-2689)

Credits:3

The aim of the course is to examine religious and ethical perspectives on war and peacebuildng. The course will examine the role and limitation of religion in the process of peacebuilding. Such a perspective will illuminate appeals to religion both in generating conflict and in the process of peacebuilding and their implications in the rise of religious fundamentalism affecting security. The course will also evaluate the role of religious and political institutions and non-governmental organizations in addressing consequences of conflict and the search for lasting peace. The required readings for the course are mainly drawn from public theology, political philosophy, social science, and political science. Topics to be explored include: 1) Foundation of public values; 2) Human rights and the common good; 3) Political of identity, inclusion, and multiculturalism; 4) Religious conscience, political responsibility, and social organization; 5) Christian pacifism and political realism; 6) Just war theory; 7) Islam ethics of war and peace; 8) The convergence of forgiveness, justice and politics; 9) Ambiguity and limitation of religion; 10) Methodologies of conflict resolution and social reconciliation; 11) Peacebuilding, democratization, and governance; 12) The role of non-governmental organizations in peacebuilding. Open to students in all programs; evaluation based on class participation, written summaries of readings, one 20-25 page paper. [25 max enrollment]

TRANSFORMNG CHRISTIAN THEOLGY (STRS-3288)

Credits:3

This course explores the intersections of constructive theology and critical social theory (especially ^queer theorizing^ around sexuality and gender, but also concerning race, ethnicity, and class). By retrieving key historical insights from the development of traditional Christian doctrinal topics (such as God, Christ, Trinity, salvation, and so on), we will build strategies for transforming Christian theology in light of contemporary challenges and opportunities in Christian witness and ministry. We will also attend carefully to how transforming Christian theology contributes to the work of social transformation more widely. Lecture and discussion; critical reflection paper and research project. Upgrades available for DMin and PhD students.This course is the in-class version of STRS 8288 Transforming Christian Theology. Students wishing to take the online version of this class should register for STRS 8288. [Introductory courses in church history and theology recommended]

CONSTRUCTIVE SWEDENBORG THLGY (STRS-3782)

Credits:3

Using the lens of Swedenborgian theology and the approach of constructive theology, this course will examine and explore five contemporary themes that are especially active in social and cultural discourse. Constructive theology attempts to bring the materials of a specific tradition into dialogwith contemporary issues, and using the resources of Swedenborgian thought we will engage ecologyand environmentalism, theodicy, pluralism and Christian supremacy, the consumerist American ethos, and the ^New Atheism.^ Each day of the course will be devoted to one theme. Readings for each theme will include secondary literature on the theme, as well as primary and secondary literature from Swedenborg and Swedenborgian thinkers. Class meets daily from 1/21/13-1/25/13, 9:00am-5:00pm, in MUDD 103.

EROS, EUCHARIST,SOCIAL CHANGE (STRS-4000)

Credits:3

If ^God is love^ is God also ^eros^? Do contemporary notions of eroticism make a difference in how we could read biblical texts and historical Christian traditions? Does any of this matter for how Christian faith communities engage in positive social change? This course will explore the various cultural and historical meanings of the erotic in the development of Christian theological traditions and especially how these are reflected (or not) in Eucharistic liturgical celebrations. We will consider and test the hypothesis that ^eros^ marks a fundamental desire for ^communion,^ which is on display at the Eucharistic Table, and further, that the erotic character of the Table offers a vision for social transformation rooted in the Christian Gospel. Lecture and seminar-style discussion; introductory course in theology recommended; offered in both live and online sections.

CHRIST, CULTURE, MINISTRY (STRS-4001)

Credits:3

Who is Jesus in today's diverse, globalized world? How do we relate Christ and culture for more effective ministry? What can Christian theology offer to the complexities of the ^public square,^ which is increasingly multi-cultural and multi-religious? This course invites active engagement with both texts and contexts as we analyze the rich development of approaches to Christology. Theological reflection on Jesus Christ has always been contextual, from first-century biblical writers to the early formative centuries of Christian traditions and on through to the vast multiplication of proposals and projects in the twentieth century and today. We will examine both historical and contemporary theologians for insights into the significance of race, ethnicity, class, and gender in our shared work of ^constructing^ Christ in our own contexts. Class meets daily, 7/17/17-7/21/17, from 5:30pm-9pm, in Honolulu, Hawaii, and then for two weeks online.

Foucault and Derrida: Mystics (STRS-4070)

Credits:3

This will be a seminar style course where students will engage with primary texts from two of the leading figures in ^postmodern philosophy,^ Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida. The course will be designed to give students a framework for engaging these two figures critically and constructively as dialog partners in christian theology, specifically their engagement with and criticisms of negative theology (Such as apophatic or mystical approaches to theology). As a seminar course, students are expected to engage with the texts, one another, and the instructor as we wrestle with what it means to talk about God, or as once was asked to Derrida, ^Who are you praying to?^ This course is taught by PhD student Stephen Quarles with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Jay Johnson.

QUEERING THE REFORMATION (STRS-4075)

Credits:3

In ^Queering the Reformation^, students will have the opportunity to read primary texts of some of the most influential European Reformers and relate the texts to a unique methodology arising out of contemporary concerns. Students will be introduced to queer theology, learn its history, and also the strengths and weaknesses of this approach. Students will then have the ability to utilize this approach--to ^queer^--the Reformation by closely examining and discussing the works of Martin Luther, John Calvin, Ulrich Zwingli, Marie Dentiere, and others in a seminar format. This course is intended for MA students with at least one semester of theology. This course is taught by PhD student Joshua Warfield with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Jay Johnson.

LATINX PERSPTV ON CHURCH&THEO (STRS-4720)

Credits:1.5

Desde el Otro Lado: Latino/a Perspectives on Church and Theology, Session I ((Section 1) Latinos/as make up 38.8% of the population of California, and are one of the driving forces in the vitality of Christianity in the state and around the hemisphere. Intended for church leaders of all backgrounds, this course will introduce students to the varieties of Latino/a experience in the United States, while also relating these experiences to Latin America, and explore ways in which these experiences and the resulting perspectives affect or enrich standards views on scripture, church and theology. The course will engage: . The importance of context in theology and hermeneutics . The Latino/a reality in the US . Issues of language and culture . Defining dimensions: Mestizaje, in-betweenness, exile, identity and generational issues . How all of this affects the reading and interpretation of Scripture, church history, theology, preaching, counseling, and church administration Course meets daily 6/12/17-6/16/17, from 8:30am- 12:30pm at MUDD 102. [40 max enrollment] Desde el Otro Lado: Latino/a Perspectives on Church and Theology, Session I and Session II. (Section 2) This course will build upon Dr. Gonzßlez's teachings of the Latinx reality in the US and expound on the importance of context within theology and hermeneutics. Students are able to take this course for 1.5 credits (or 2 CEU's) or 3 credits. Students who wish to continue in the class and receive 3 academic credits, the course will continue online from June 19 - 23 under the leadership of Professor Filipe Maia. Assignments for the second week will be sent to those who register for 3 credits. Prerequisite: Desde el Otro Lado: Latino/a Perspectives on Church and Theology, Part I or by approval of the instructor. Course meets daily 6/12/17-6/16/17, from 8:30am-12:30pm at MUDD 102 and online 6/19/17-6/23/17.

SOCIAL TRANSFORM & LIBERATION (STRS-8250)

Credits:3

SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION AND LIBERATION What is social transformation and how can it be effected? This course explores how different understandings of social transformation and especially concepts of ^liberation^ shape public life and discourse. The class considers a number of different movements, some theological, some not, including liberation philosophy and theology and post-colonial thought. Figures to be read include Cornel West, Gustavo Gurierrez, Enrique Dussel, Marcella Althaus Reid, Karl Marx, Simone Weil, Franz Fanon, Edward Said, and Gayatri Spivak. {Faculty Consent required]

TRANSFORMING CHRSTN COMMUNITY (STRS-8253)

Credits:3

How can Christian witness shape communities of social change? How are ostensibly secular movements of social change reshaping the mission and dynamics of Christian congregations? Where do these questions intersect with emerging forms of theological ethics concerning sexuality, gender, and family? This course invites exploration of these topics through the lens of historical Christian traditions and critical social theory (especially forms of ^queer theorizing^). An analysis of diverse sexual intimacies and varied familial patterns will suggest more broadly the challenges and opportunities for nurturing theologically rooted and ritually formed Christian communities of social transformation. Lectures, discussion, presentations, and final project. NOTE: This course is the ONLINE version of STRS 2561 Transforming Christian Community. Only students taking the course as an online course should register using this course number; all others should register for STRS 2561. This course meets asynchronously using Moodle. It has no required meeting times. High-speed internet connection required. See http://moodle.gtu.edu/mod/resource/view.php?id=227 17 for full technology requirements.

CHRIST AND CULTURE (STRS-8284)

Credits:3

How do we think and engage theologically with the ^world^? What can Christian theology offer to the complexities of today's ^public square,^ which is increasingly multi-cultural and multi-religious? What does theologically informed spiritual formation look like for social transformation? This course invites active engagement with both texts and communities as we analyze the development and multiplicity of approaches to Christology. As we explore together what Christ has to do with culture, we work toward constructing a Christian theology of social change and transformation. (This course is the ONLINE version of STRS-2384.)

TRANSFORMNG CHRISTIAN THEOLGY (STRS-8288)

Credits:3

This course explores the intersections of constructive theology and critical social theory (especially ^queer theorizing^ around sexuality and gender, but also concerning race, ethnicity, and class). By retrieving key historical insights from the development of traditional Christian doctrinal topics (such as God, Christ, Trinity, salvation, and so on), we will build strategies for transforming Christian theology in light of contemporary challenges and opportunities in Christian witness and ministry. Upgrades available for D.Min. and Ph.D. students. NOTE: This course is the ONLINE version of STRS 3288 Transforming Christian Theology. Only students taking the course as an online course should register using this course number; all others should register for STRS 3288. This course meets asynchronously using Moodle (http://gtu.edu/library/students/moodle-help). High-speed internet connection required. (Occasional synchronous class meetings maybe scheduled; see syllabus for details.) [Introductory courses in church history and theology recommended]

FEMINIST RDNGS OF LGBT THLGS (STRS-8329)

Credits:3

This course will foreground feminist readings and modes of analysis in engaging with the range of possible LGBT-related theologies. Feminist theologies are themselves diverse and wide-ranging yet often serve only as a historical "precursor" to LGBT and/or queer theologies or are ignored in those projects. By analyzing the development and depth of feminist modes of theological thought and action, we will examine both LGBT and queer theologies in light of those feminist insights and ponder the future of these theological modes of practice. This ONLINE course meets asynchronously using Moodle. It has no required meeting times. High-speed internet connection required. See http://moodle.gtu.edu/mod/resource/view.php?id=227 17 for full technology requirements.

EROS, EUCHARIST,SOCIAL CHANGE (STRS-8400)

Credits:3

If ^God is love^ is God also ^eros^? Do contemporary notions of eroticism make a difference in how we could read biblical texts and historical Christian traditions? Does any of this matter for how Christian faith communities engage in positive social change? This course will explore the various cultural and historical meanings of the erotic in the development of Christian theological traditions and especially how these are reflected (or not) in Eucharistic liturgical celebrations. We will consider and test the hypothesis that ^eros^ marks a fundamental desire for ^communion,^ which is on display at the Eucharistic Table, and further, that the erotic character of the Table offers a vision for social transformation rooted in the Christian Gospel. Introductory course in theology recommended; this course is the ONLINE version of STRS-4000.

DEATH AND IMMORTALITY (STSP-2100)

Credits:3

This class will consider the related concepts of death and immortality primarily from a Swedenborgian perspective. In addition to Swedenborg's writings on death and immortality and the legacy of these writings in modern western conceptions of an afterlife, readings will engage medical and pastoral approaches to the end of life, perspectives on near death experiences, and beliefs concerning the afterlife from different religious traditions. This interdisciplinary approach will allow an engagement with those currently ministering to the dying such as hospice chaplains and pastors, as well a historical study of the influence of Swedenborgian views on notable readers such as Immanuel Kant, William Blake, HonorT de Balzac, Helen Keller and Houston Smith. Assignments will also engage artistic and cinematic treatments of death and/or immortality.

BUDDHIST-CHRISTIAN DIALOGUE (STSP-2278)

Credits:3

The purpose of the course is to introduce students to a comparative reading of Christianity and Buddhism, focusing on a series of conceptual and theological foci that are developed in analogous, yet distinctive manner in the two religious traditions. After a general introduction to Buddhism and an overview of the differences between Theravada, Mahayana and Vajrayana, students will move on to explore the foundations of interreligious dialogue, as well as the chief differences between dialogue in the strict sense, theology of religions, and comparative theology. A brief excursus into the realm of exegesis and Scriptural interpretation will segue into questions of cosmology and anthropology, and address the different ways in which the two traditions have conceptualized the notion of divine embodiment. The final part of the course will focus on spiritual practice and the role of the virtues, addressing the question of gradual and immediate approaches to salvation, as well as issues of sexuality and gender. Students will be encouraged to explore the points of contact between the two traditions, but also evaluate and address any irreducible difference that may emerge from their reading. The course is primarily geared to advanced Masters students, but doctoral students are also welcome. Previous classes in interreligious dialogue are helpful, but they are not required. [Faculty Consent required; 18 max enrollment]

THE BODY IN CHRISTIAN THEOLGY (STSP-4340)

Credits:3

This course seeks to construct, through reading, lecture, and discussion, a Christian theology of the human body, which is consistent with and informed by contemporary biology. The course will first review the Christian conception of the human body in its historical thought and spirituality by surveying a variety of sources, which give special attention to the relationship between body, mind, and soul or spirit. Second, these findings will be placed into dialogue with contemporary biology, especially complexity and systems theory, evolution, and ecology. The course will also attempt to address the effect of a biologically-informed theology of the body may have upon the experience of God, self, and world. This course is taught by PhD student Jamie Randolph with a Newhall award, under the supervision of Ted Peters. [Auditors with faculty permission]

IMAGINATION LIBERATION HRMNTC (STSP-4500)

Credits:3

This course designed for Advanced M.Div, MA or STL, STD and PhD students will employ a modified seminar format to bring into dialogue political/ contextual theologies and/or spiritualities with with mystical traditions & biblical horizons. The seminar is going to employ different hermeneutical approaches to facilitate this dialogue and will give the student an opportunity to think through their own hermeneutical approach in their research. [Faculty Consent required; 18 max enrollment; Auditors with faculty permission]

FEMINIST, WOMANIST, MUJERISTA (STSP-4538)

Credits:3

In this course we will explore the contributions of Third Wave feminist theologies with particular attention to their development within US and Latin American contexts. We will begin the course with some methodological foundations, then we will focus our attention on key theological themes such as: theological anthropology, christology, ecclesiology, cosmology, and suffering. We will look at feminist responses to these theological problems in light of their particular contexts and their understanding of the shared struggle of women. Special attention will be paid to the often underrepresented role of spirituality in these texts as we consistently raise the question, ^What is the spirituality with which this theology is engaged?^ Previous study of feminist theologies is welcome (i.e. completion of the Women's Studies in Religion Seminar in Spring or Fall 2012) but not required. The teacher-students regret that we will not be able to include the experiences of all women in the Americas, but we have designed a course that speaks to the women-centered approaches with which we are most conversant, namely, Womanist Theologies, White Feminist Theologies, and Latina Feminist and Mujerista Theologies. Assignments include weekly response papers, a presentation, and a final paper. Open to upper level MDivs, MA/MTS, STL, STD, and PhD with some upgrading. [12 max enrollment; PIN code required; Auditors excluded] NOTE: This course is co-taught by PhD students Lauren Guerra and Jennifer Owens with Newhall Awards, under the supervision of Dr. Eduardo Fernandez.

CHURCH ON THE MOVE (STSP-4725)

Credits:3

The course examines contemporary ecclesial movements and their pastoral/spiritual contribution to the life of the Church. While John Paul II hailed religious movements as ^a new Spring,^ many have created tension within the wider community. The course seeks to understand Christian movements from within, working with the testimony of leaders and members. Movements considered include: Catholic Action, Catholic Worker, Focolare, Communion and Liberation, Neo-Catechumens, Basic Ecclesial Communities, Cursillo, Sant'Egidio, Charismatic Renewal, Volunteer movements. Format: Class meets only during the first half of the semester. Lecture to seminar; evaluation: group work, research paper and class presentations.